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Encyclopedia > Phylogenetic

A phylogeny (or phylogenesis) is the origin and evolution of a set of organisms, usually of a species. A major task of systematics is to determine the ancestral relationships among known species (both living and extinct), and the most commonly used methods to infer phylogenies include cladistics, phenetics, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian.


During the late 19th century, the theory of recapitulation, or Haeckel's biogenetic law, was widely accepted. This theory was often expressed as "ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny", i.e. that the development of an organism exactly mirrors the evolutionary development of the species. The early version of this hypothesis has since been rejected as being oversimplified and misleading. However, modern biology recognizes numerous connections between ontogeny and phylogeny, explains them using evolutionary theory, and views them as supporting evidence for that theory. See the article on ontogeny and phylogeny.


See also

External links

  • The Tree of Life (http://tolweb.org/tree/phylogeny.html)
  • PhyloCode (http://www.ohiou.edu/phylocode/)

  Results from FactBites:
 
CLC bio: Phylogenetics (1390 words)
Phylogenetics is therefore an integral part of the science of systematics that aims to establish the phylogeny of organisms based on their characteristics.
Furthermore, phylogenetics is central to evolutionary biology as a whole as it is the condensation of the overall paradigm of how life arose and developed on earth.
The phylogenetic tree in figure 2.1 is rooted at the most recent common ancestor of all Hominidae species, and therefore represents a hypothesis of the direction of evolution e.g.
Britain.tv Wikipedia - Phylogenetics (617 words)
In biology, phylogenetics (Greek: phylon = tribe, race and genetikos = relative to birth, from genesis = birth) is the study of evolutionary relatedness among various groups of organisms (e.g., species, populations).
Phylogenetic taxonomy, which is an offshoot of, but not a logical consequence of, phylogenetic systematics, constitutes a means of classifying groups of organisms according to degree of evolutionary relatedness.
All methods depend upon an implicit or explicit mathematical model describing the evolution of characters observed in the species included, and are usually used for molecular phylogeny where the characters are aligned nucleotide or amino acid sequences.
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