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Encyclopedia > Phoenix (mythology)
The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary.
The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary.

The phoenix (Ancient Greek: Φοῖνιξ, phoínix) is a mythical sacred firebird in ancient Phoenician mythology, and in myths derived from it. Fire-bird myths include: Benu Fenghuang Garuda Hoo Oo Phoenix Categories: Mythology stubs ... Look up Phoenix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Phoenix_detail_from_Aberdeen_Bestiary. ... Image File history File links Phoenix_detail_from_Aberdeen_Bestiary. ... Categories: Art stubs | Literature stubs | Illuminated manuscripts ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Fire-bird myths include: Benu Fenghuang Garuda Hoo Oo Phoenix Categories: Mythology stubs ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Description

A phoenix is a mythical bird with beautiful gold and red plumage. At the end of its life-cycle the phoenix builds itself a nest of cinnamon twigs that it then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix arises. The new phoenix is destined to live, usually, as long as the old one. In some stories, the new phoenix embalms the ashes of the old phoenix in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis (sun city in Greek). The bird was also said to regenerate when hurt or wounded by a foe, thus being almost immortal and invincible — a symbol of fire and divinity.[1] Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Embalming, in most modern cultures, is a process used to temporarily preserve a human cadaver to forestall decomposition and make it suitable for display at a funeral. ... 100g of Myrrh. ... For other uses, see Heliopolis. ... In biology, regeneration is an organisms ability to replace body parts. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ...


Although descriptions (and life-span) vary, the phoenix (Bennu bird) became popular in early Christian art, literature and Christian symbolism, as a symbol of Christ representing his resurrection, immortality, and life-after-death (1 Clement 25). Michael W. Holmes points out that early Christian writers justified their use of this myth because the word appears in Psalm 92:12 [LXX Psalm 91:13], but in that passage it actually refers to a palm tree, not a mythological bird, [2] however, it was the "flourishing of Christian Hebraist interpretations of Job 29:18 that brought the Joban phoenix to life for Christian readers of the seventeenth century. At the heart of these interpretations is the proliferation of richly complementary meanings that turn upon three translations of the word chol -- as phoenix, palm tree, or sand -- in Job 29:18." [1] The Bennu bird serves as the Egyptian correspondence to the phoenix, and is said to be the soul of the Sun-God Ra. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christian symbolism... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Fountain of Eternal Life in Cleveland, Ohio Immortality (or eternal life) is the concept of living in physical or spiritual form for an infinite length of time, or in a state of timelessness. ... For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ... The Epistles of Clement often referred to as 1 Clement and 2 Clement were not accepted in the canonic New Testament. ...


Originally, the phoenix was identified by the Egyptians as a stork or heron-like bird called a benu, known from the Book of the Dead and other Egyptian texts as one of the sacred symbols of worship at Heliopolis, closely associated with the rising sun and the Egyptian sun-god Ra. For other uses, see Stork (disambiguation). ... Genera See text. ... The Bennu bird serves as the Egyptian correspondence to the phoenix, and is said to be the soul of the Sun-God Ra. ... For other uses, see Book of the Dead (disambiguation). ... Sol redirects here. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating, the sun, an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology Statue of Hathor - Luxor Museum Sun god redirects here. ... For other uses, see Ra (disambiguation). ...


The Greeks adapted the word bennu (and also took over its further Egyptian meaning of date palm tree), and identified it with their own word phoenix φοίνιξ, meaning the color purple-red or crimson (cf. Phoenicia). They and the Romans subsequently pictured the bird more like a peacock or an eagle. According to the Greeks the phoenix lived in Phoenicia next to a well. At dawn, it bathed in the water of the well, and the Greek sun-god Apollo stopped his chariot (the sun) in order to listen to its song. Binomial name L. The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, extensively cultivated for its edible fruit. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... Phoenicia (or Phenicia ,[1] from Biblical Phenice [1]) was an ancient civilization centered in the north of ancient Canaan, with its heartland along the coast of modern day Lebanon and Syria. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ... Genera Several, see text. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ...


One inspiration that has been suggested for the Egyptian phoenix is the flamingo of East Africa. This bright pink or white bird nests on salt flats that are too hot for its eggs or chicks to survive; it builds a mound several inches tall and large enough to support its egg, which it lays in that marginally cooler location. The convection currents around these mounds resembles the turbulence of a flame. In zoology, flamingos are part of the family Phoenicopteridae, from the generic name Phoenicopterus or "phoenix-winged." Species See text For other uses, see Flamingo (disambiguation). ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  Geographic East Africa, including the UN subregion and East African Community East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... It has been suggested that Playa lake be merged into this article or section. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... In fluid dynamics, turbulence or turbulent flow is a flow regime characterized by chaotic, stochastic property changes. ... Flame generated by the burning of a candle. ...


Some medieval Jewish commentators comment upon the Hebrew word Hol (חול) in the biblical book of Job ("...Then I said, I shall die in my nest, and I shall multiply my days as the sand (Hol)...", Job 29:18, the King James translation) as referring to phoenix [3]. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ...


"Phoenix" is also the English-language name given to the most important bird in Chinese mythology, the fenghuang, with its own set of characteristics and symbolic meanings. Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ...


Related usage

In Persian mythology, Si'morgh, (Persian: سيمرغ, Middle Persian: senmurv) was a winged, bird-like creature that was very large and extremely ancient. The Simurgh appears in many Iranian literary classics such as Farid ud-Din Attar's Conference of the Birds as instructor and birds leader, and in Ferdowsi's epic Shahnameh (The Book of Kings); Phoenix raised up and cherished Zaal or Zal, grandfather of Rostam. Persia redirects here. ... Farsi redirects here. ... Pahlavi is a term that refers: (1) to a script used in Iran derived from the Aramaic script, and (2) more broadly, to Middle Persian, the Middle Iranian language written in this script. ... The Conference of the Birds painted by Habib Allah. ... The Concourse of the Birds painted by Habib Allah. ... Tomb of Ferdowsi in Tus HakÄ«m Abol-Qāsem FerdowsÄ« TÅ«sÄ« (Persian: ), more commonly transliterated as Ferdowsi, (935–1020) was a highly revered Persian poet. ... Shâhnameh Shāhnāmé, or Shāhnāma (Persian: )(alternative spellings are Shahnama, Shahnameh, Shahname, Shah-Nama, etc. ... ZÃ¥l (زال in Persian) was a mythical warrior of ancient Iran. ... Rostam Slaying the Dragon- A miniature Painting by Master Mahmoud Farshchian. ...


The phoenix is a central figure in Lebanese ancient and modern cultures, as Lebanese are descendants of the Phoenicians and often claim themselves sons of the Phoenix. Lebanon, and Beirut particularly, is often depicted symbolically as a phoenix bird having been destroyed and rebuilt 7 times during its long history.

The phoenix in the Forbidden City, Beijing, China.
The phoenix in the Forbidden City, Beijing, China.

In China, Fenghuang ("鳳凰") is a mythical bird superficially similar to the phoenix. It is the second most-respected legendary creature (second to the dragon), mostly used to represent the empress. The phoenix is the leader of birds. In Japan, the phoenix is called hō-ō(kanji:"鳳凰") or fushichō (不死鳥?); "Immortal Bird". Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1108 KB) 北京颐和园仁寿殿前的凤凰 Shizhao2005å¹´11月 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Phoenix (mythology) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 1108 KB) 北京颐和园仁寿殿前的凤凰 Shizhao2005å¹´11月 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Phoenix (mythology) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... For other uses, see Forbidden City (disambiguation). ... Peking redirects here. ... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ...


In Russian folklore, the phoenix appears as the Zhar-Ptitsa (Жар-Птица), or firebird, subject of the famous 1910 ballet score by Igor Stravinsky. The phoenix was featured in the flags of Alexander Ypsilantis and of many other captains during the Greek Revolution, symbolizing Greece's rebirth, and was chosen by John Capodistria as the first Coat of Arms of the Greek State (1828-1832). In addition, the first modern Greek currency bore the name of phoenix. Despite being replaced by a royal Coat of Arms, it remained a popular symbol, and was used again in the 1930s by the Second Hellenic Republic. However, its use by the military junta of 1967-1974 made it extremely unpopular, and it has almost disappeared from use after 1974, with the notable exception of the Greek Order of the Phoenix). In Russian folklore, the Firebird (жар-птица, literally ember bird from жар ember, flameless fire) is a magical glowing bird from a faraway land, which is both blessing and doom of its captor. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Firebird (French: LOiseau de feu; Russian: Жар-птица, Žar-ptica) is a 1910 ballet by Igor Stravinsky. ... Igor Stravinsky. ... Alexander Ypsilanti (1792 – January 31, 1828) was a Greek military commander and national hero. ... Combatants Greek guerilla forces Ottoman Empire forces Commanders Kolokotronis Vrionis, Ibrahim Pasha Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The Greek War of Independence, also known as the Greek Revolution, was a successful war waged by the Greeks between 1821 and 1827 to win independence from the Ottoman Empire. ... Ioannis Kapodistrias (1776-1831). ... Phoenix (Greek Φοίνιξ). The first currency of the modern Greek state. ... The history of the Hellenic Republic constitutes three discrete periods in Greek History: 1822 - 1832, 1924 - 1935 and 1974 - present. ... George Papadopoulos Greek Γεώργιος Παπαδόπουλος, Georgios Papadopoulos, (May 5, 1919 – June 27, 1999) was the head of the military coup détat that took place in Greece on April 21, 1967 and leader of the military regime that ruled the country during the period 1967 - 1974. ... Grand Cross of the Order of the Phoenix, III. type The Order of the Phoenix (Greek Τάγμα του Φοίνικος) is an Order (decoration) of Greece, established on May 13, 1926 by the republican government of the Second Hellenic Republic to replace the defunct Royal Order of George I. The Order was retained by...


In Jewish folklore, it is said that the phoenix was the only animal not to join Adam in his banishment from the Garden of Eden. For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ...


The phoenix is also a prominent symbol on the flag and seal of the City and County of San Francisco, symbolizing the city rising from the ashes of the devastation caused by the 1906 earthquake. Similarly, the phoenix is also the central feature of the seal and flag of the City of Atlanta, along with the word Resurgens (Latin for having been restored/rebuilt, revived, rose up/appeared again; rared up again, lifted oneself), symbolizing the seemingly continual rebirth of the city after several devastating fires, most notable of which are General Sherman's burning of the city during the American Civil War on November 15, 1864 and the Great Atlanta fire of 1917. In New York, 7 weeks after 9/11, in a widely-televised event, a giant illuminated Phoenix puppet led New York's Village Halloween Parade as a symbol of the city's rebirth from the ashes (the puppet was designed by Parade designer Sophia Michahelles of the group Superior Concept Monsters) This article is about the city in California. ... Arnold Genthes famous photograph of San Francisco following the earthquake, looking towards the fire on Sacramento Street. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Extent of the fire The Great Atlanta fire of 1917 began just after noon on Monday, May 21 and was finally extinguished by 10 PM. Destroyed were 300 acres (much of the Fourth Ward), including nearly 2,000 homes, businesses and churches, and 10,000 people were displaced. ... // Volunteers costumed as a deck of playing cards shuffle up Sixth Avenue in New Yorks Village Halloween Parade, directed by artist and producer Jeanne Fleming. ... Sophia Michahelles of Superior Concept Monsters designed this incandescant baby phoenix puppet for New Yorks Village Halloween Parade in 2001, as a response to the attack on the World Trade Center. ... A twenty-foot caterpillar puppet designed by Alex Kahn spreads its wings to became a Luna Moth in the 1998 Halloween parade in New Yorks Greenwich Village. ...


Phoenix, Arizona was so named due to the town's usage of old Hohokam (Native American) canal paths, and the fact that the area contained the remains of various Hohokam settlements. It is believed that this group migrated out of the area due to devastating floods and droughts between 1300-1450 AD. The establishment of modern Phoenix was seen as a rebirth of this older civilization. The new city itself suffered damage from several large floods in its early years, such as in 1900, but eventually grew into one of the US's largest metropolitan areas as of the 21st century. The mythological bird is present on the city's flag and logo. Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Hohokam is the name applied to one of the four major prehistoric archaeological traditions of the American Southwest. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... 20XX redirects here. ...


In Taiwan the phoenix provides a popular nickname for the coastal city of Tainan, called "the Phoenix city" because of its history of transformations and renewals. Three of the birds, flying clockwise in a circle, appear on the flag and logo of the Tainan University of Technology.[4] Tainan redirects here; for the county of the same name see Tainan County. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ... Tainan University of Technology Founded: 1964 Colors: Purple and White Symbol: Phoenix 529 Jhongjheng Road Yongkang, Tainan 71002 Taiwan Telephone 886 6 2532106 Fax: 886 6 2540702 Web Site: http://www. ...


The Phoenix is used to symbolize the physical tests in Kyokushin Karate and is the mascot of the Phoenix Karatedo Association. Kyokushin is a style of stand-up, full contact karate, founded in 1964 by Masutatsu Oyama (大山倍達) who was born under the name Choi Yeong-Eui (최영의). Kyokushinkai is Japanese for the society of the ultimate truth. ... For other uses, see Karate (disambiguation). ...


The New Zealand football team in the Australian A-League are called the Wellington Phoenix, a reference to their 'rising from the ashes' of the New Zealand Knights, the former team representing the NZ market.


The Phoenix was also used as a name to a particular class of Public Transport Trams in Brisbane, Australia. The Phoenix Class were built in the mid 1960's from salvaged parts of trams destroyed in the 1962 Paddinton Tram Depot fire.


See also

The Phoenix represented in the 60 years of peace coin.
The Phoenix represented in the 60 years of peace coin.
  • The Phoenix has been in a numerous times the main motive for collectors’ coins and medals, one of the most recent one is the famous Belgian 10 euro silver coin 60 years of peace. The obverse depicts the Phoenix as a representation of a new Europe, post 1945.
  • Fenghuang, commonly referred to as the Chinese phoenix.
  • Firebird (Russian folklore), equivalent of phoenix in Russian mythology.
  • Bennu, Egyptian correspondence to the phoenix.
  • Angha, Huma, Simurgh, Persian phoenixes.
  • Adarna, Philippine version of the phoenix
  • Garuda, in Indian version of the phoenix
  • Phoenix in popular culture

Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ... In Russian folklore, the Firebird (жар-птица, zhar-ptitsa, literally ember bird from жар ember, flameless fire) is a magical glowing bird from a faraway land, which is both blessing and doom of its captor. ... The Bennu bird serves as the Egyptian correspondence to the phoenix, and is said to be the soul of the Sun-God Ra. ... Angha may refer to: Salaheddin Ali Nader Shah Angha Shah Maghsoud Sadegh Angha Mir Ghotbeddin Mohammad Angha Jalaleddin Ali Mir Abolfazl Angha The Angha also known as the Simorgh is depicted in Iranian art as a winged creature in the shape of a bird, gigantic enough to carry off an... The Huma, also known as the bird of paradise, is a Persian mythological bird, similar to the Egyptian phoenix, which consumes itself in fire every few hundred years, only to rise anew from the ashes. ... Sassanid silk twill textile of a Simorgh in a beaded surround, 6-7th c. ... The Adarna Eagle , or Ibong Adarna is a creature of Philippine legend. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The phoenix has proved an enduring allegorical symbol, symbolising rebirth, renewal or uniqueness and often appears in modern popular culture. ...

References

  1. ^ Herodotus, The Histories II.73
  2. ^ (Holmes, The Apostolic Fathers: Greek texts and English translations, page 59.)
  3. ^ The Phoenix.
  4. ^ =http://www.tut.edu.tw/webmaster/w1secret/%BE%C7%AE%D5%C2%B2%A4%B6/English/e-01.htm Tainan University of Technology official site
  • R. Van den Broek, The Myth of the Phoenix - According to Classical and Early Christian Traditions, E.J.Brill, Leiden, 1972.
  • Silvia Fabrizio-Costa (ed.), La Fenice : mito e segno (simposio dell’università di Caen), Peter Lang, Bern, 2001. ISBN 3-906767-89-2
  • Françoise Lecocq, « Les sources égyptiennes du mythe du phénix », L’Egypte à Rome (simposio dell’università di Caen), éd. F. Lecocq, Cahiers de la Maison de la Recherche en Sciences Humaines, n° 41, Caen, 2005. ISSN 1250-6419, reed. 2008 (p211-266.)
  • Francesco Zambon, Alessandro Grossato, Il mito della fenice in Oriente e in Occidente, Venezia, Marsilio Editori, 2004. ISBN 88-317-8614-8

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Phoenix
In heraldry, a charge is an image occupying the field on an escutcheon (or shield). ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... The winged lion of Mark the Evangelist for centuries has been the national emblem and landmark of Venice (detail from a painting by Vittore Carpaccio, 1516) The lion is a common charge in heraldry. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... The Polish coat of arms has an eagle as the main subject. ... For other uses, see Pelican (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rook. ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Basilisk (disambiguation). ... The biscione as a symbol of Milan, seen here at the Central Station The biscione, together with the Imperial eagle, on the coat of arms of the Duchy of Milan The Biscione (‘large grass snake’), also known as the Vipera (‘viper’ or in Milanese as the Bissa), is a heraldic... Cockatrice A cockatrice is a legendary creature, an ornament in the drama and poetry of the Elizabethans (Breiner). ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607) For other uses, see Manticore (disambiguation). ... A martlet is a type of heraldic bird similar to the swallow, but having no feet. ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... A 16th-century image of a salamander from M. M. Pattison Muirs The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry The salamander an amphibian of the order Urodela. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Coryphaena hippurus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin fish or dorado, are a species of surface-dwelling fish found in tropical and subtropical waters. ... Species  E. americanus –       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius – northern pike  E. masquinongy – muskellunge  E. niger – chain pickerel   – Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Species  E. americanus –       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius – northern pike  E. masquinongy – muskellunge  E. niger – chain pickerel   – Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Genera See text. ... For other uses, see Western honey bee and Bee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Phoenix, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com (1120 words)
The Phoenix is a fabulous and sacred bird.
It is from the pictures that they have described the Phoenix, saying that it had the appearance of an eagle, both in shape and size, and that his plumage was partly golden, and partly red.
Phoenix 1, brother of Europa or perhaps her father, was son either of Agenor 1 or of Belus 1; these two descend from Libya, daughter of Epaphus 1, son of Io.
Phoenix (mythology) - New World Encyclopedia (1741 words)
The new phoenix embalmed the ashes of the old phoenix in an egg made of myrrh and deposited it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis ("the city of the sun" in Greek).
The phoenix became a symbol of Christianity in early literature, either from ancient Hebrew legend regarding a phoenix in the Garden of Eden, or from the incorporation of Greek and Roman culture, or from a combination of both.
Elizabeth I used the phoenix as a royal badge, while some cities in Europe use the phoenix in their municipal emblem to denote the one-time destruction and consequent rebuilding of the city, connecting to the image of resurrection inherent in the phoenix.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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