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Encyclopedia > Phoebe (mythology)
Greek deities
series
Primordial deities
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities
Titans
The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius

Phoebe (pronunced "fee-bee") was one of the original Titans, one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. Traditionally associated with the moon, she was the grandmother of Apollo and Artemis. By Coeus she mothered Leto and Asteria. She received control of the Oracle at Delphi from Themis, according to a minority of sources. Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... The ancient Greeks proposed many different ideas about the primordial gods in their mythology. ... The twelve gods of Olympus. ... The ancient Greeks had a large number of sea gods. ... In mythology chthonic (from Greek χθονιος-pertaining to the earth; earthy) designates, or pertains to, gods or spirits of the underworld, especially in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek Μουσαι, Mousai) are nine archaic goddesses who embody the right evocation of myth, inspired through remembered and improvised song and traditional music and dances. ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Oceanus or Okeanos refers to the ocean, which the Greeks and Romans regarded as a river circling the world. ... In Greek mythology, Tethys was a Titaness and sea goddess who was both sister and wife of Oceanus. ... In the Homers Iliad and Odyssey the sun god is called Helios Hyperion, Sun High-one. But in the Odyssey, Hesiods Theogony and the Homeric Hymn to Demeter the sun is once in each work called Hyperonides son of Hyperion and Hesiod certainly imagines Hyperion as a separate... In Greek mythology, Theia (also written Thea or Thia), also called Euryphaessa (wide-shining), was a Titan. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... Cronus receives the Omphalos Stone from his wife Rhea and devours it unaware that Zeus was safe; painting was made between 475 B.C. and 425 B.C. Cronus (of obscure etymology, perhaps related to horned), pronounced: kroh-nuhs , also spelled Cronos or Kronos, is often confused with Chronos/Khronos. ... Rhea (or Ria meaning she who flows) was the Titaness daughter of Uranus and of Gaia. ... Mnemosyne (Greek , IPA in RP and in General American) (sometimes shortened to Mneme) was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ... In Greek mythology, Crius was one of the Titans, a son of Uranus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology Iapetus, or Iapetos, was a Titan, the son of Uranus and Gaia, and father (by an Oceanid named Clymene or Asia) of Atlas, Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Menoetius and through Prometheus and Epimetheus and Atlas an ancestor of the human race. ... In Greek mythology, Atlas was a member of a race of giant gods known as Titans. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus, or Prometheas (Ancient Greek, Προμηθεύς, forethought) is the Titan chiefly honored for stealing fire from the gods in the stalk of a fennel plant and giving it to mortals for their use. ... Epimetheus, a Titan known for his hindsight, with Pandora and Eros. ... In Greek mythology, Menoetius referred to several different people. ... For the moon of Saturn, see Titan (moon). ... Uranus pictured on a Greek postage stamp Uranus is the Latinized form of Ouranos, Greek name of the sky. ... Gaia (World Book «JEE uh») (land or earth, from the Greek ; variant spelling Gaea—see also also Ge from ) is a Greek goddess personifying the Earth. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... The Artemis of Versailles, a Roman copy of a Hellenistic marble sculpture, now at the Louvre Museum. ... In Greek mythology, Coeus (also Koios) was the Titan of intelligence. ... In Greek mythology Lētō (Greek: Λητώ, Lato in Dorian Greek, the hidden one) is a daughter of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe, and in the Olympian scheme of things, Zeus is the father of her twins, Apollo and Artemis. ... Asteria can refer to: In Greek mythology, Asteria was the sixth killed by Heracles when he came for Hippolytes girdle. ... Michelangelos rendering of the Delphic Sibyl The Delphic Sibyl was the priestess presiding over the Apollonian Oracle at Delphi, a Greek colony, located in a plateau on the side of Mount Parnassus. ... In Greek mythology, Hesiod mentions Themis among the six sons and six daughters—of whom Cronos was one—of Gaia and Ouranos, that is, of Earth with Sky. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Phoebe (moon) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (879 words)
Phoebe is almost 4 times more distant from Saturn than its nearest major neighbor (Iapetus), and is substantially larger than any of the other moons orbiting planets at comparable distances.
Phoebe is roughly spherical and has a diameter of 220 kilometres (about 137 miles), which is equal to about one-fifteenth of the diameter of Earth's moon.
Phoebe's dark colouring initially led to scientists surmising that it was a captured asteroid, as it resembled the common class of dark carbonaceous asteroids.
Phoebe (758 words)
In the Greek pantheon, Phoebe was the daughter of Uranus and Gaia and the grandmother of Apollo and Artemis.
In the Greek myths, Phoebe was the daughter of Uranus and Gaia and the grandmother of Apollo and Artemis.
In the Greek myths, Phoebe was the daughter of Uranus and Gaia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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