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Encyclopedia > Phillips Exeter Academy

Coordinates: 42°58′48″N 70°57′04″W / 42.98, -70.95111 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Phillips Exeter Academy
Non Sibi
(Not for Oneself)
Finis Origine Pendet
(The End Depends Upon the Beginning)
χαριτι Θεου
(By the Grace of God)
Location
Exeter, NH, U.S.
Information
Religion none
Principal Tyler C. Tingley
Enrollment

1068 total
858 boarding
210 day Image File history File links Phillips Exeter Academys Seal. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...

Faculty 203
Average class size 12 students
Student:teacher ratio 5:1
Average SAT scores (2006) 688 verbal
703 math
682 writing
Type Private, boarding
Campus Township, 619 acres
127 buildings
Athletics 21 Interscholastic Sports
62 Interscholastic Teams
Mascot Lion Rampant
Established 1781
Homepage

Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9–12, located on 619 acres in Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S., fifty miles north of Boston [1]. In over two centuries of its existence, Phillips Exeter Academy has played a major role in American secondary education. It became a "national institution" early on, attracting students from all over the United States, who came to Exeter to test themselves against a demanding curriculum and faculty.[2]. For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... A township in the United States refers to a small geographic area, ranging in size from 6 to 54 square miles (15. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Rockingham County Incorporated 1638  - Board of Selectmen Paul Binette, Chairman Robert Eastman Joe Pace William Campbell Lionel Ingram Area    - Town 51. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Boston redirects here. ...


Many prominent American families chose Exeter for their children's education, and Exeter has many notable alumni, such as Daniel Webster (class of 1796), U.S. President Franklin Pierce (class of 1820), Robert Lincoln (class of 1860 and son of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln), Ulysses S. Grant, Jr. (class of 1870 and son of U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant), Amos Alonzo Stagg (class of 1880 and "grandfather of football"), and Booth Tarkington (class of 1889 and Pulitzer Prize- winning author). Exeter Alumni from both the standard school year and summer school year (including students participating in the Washington Intern Program and Foreign Studies Program) call themselves "Exonians", a name that is also referenced in the Academy's newspaper, The Exonian, the oldest preparatory school paper in America.[3] Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Robert Todd Lincoln Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 - July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Ulysses S. Grant Jr. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Time magazine, December 21, 1925 Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 _ May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Exeter belongs to an organization known as The Ten Schools Admissions Organization. This organization was founded more than forty years ago on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions among the member schools, with a focus on a cohesive standard of education for enriching the "whole" person intellectually, physically and spiritually. Exeter is especially noted for its Harkness education, a system based on a conference format of teacher and student interaction, similar to the Aristotelian method of learning through asking questions and creating discussions. Phillips Exeter Academy is part of America's oldest preparatory school rivalry in football. One of Exeter's most memorable games took place in 1913 with a 59 to 0 victory over Exeter's rival Phillips Academy Andover. Exeter also has the oldest-surviving secondary school society, The Golden Branch (founded in 1818), a society for public speaking. PEA also founded the Rhetorical Society (1807-1820), America's first secondary school organization for oratory.[4] Exeter was originally a preparatory school for matriculation to Harvard University. Today, Exonians matriculate to many top universities across America and abroad. [5] The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Oratory is the art of eloquent speech. ... Look up matriculation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harvard redirects here. ...

Contents

Origins and philosophy

Dr. John Phillips, the founder of Phillips Exeter Academy
Dr. John Phillips, the founder of Phillips Exeter Academy

The Academy was established in 1781 by merchant Dr. John Phillips and his wife Elizabeth. Dr. Phillips was previously married to Sarah Gilman, who was the wealthy widow of merchant Nathaniel Gilman, and conferred onto Phillips a large fortune used for the establishment of Exeter Academy. John Phillips was also the uncle of Samuel Phillips, Jr., who had founded Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in 1778. As a result of this family relationship, the two schools share a strong academic and athletic rivalry; the football teams have competed nearly every year since 1878. The top prep schools in the US both bear his name: Phillips Exeter Academy and Phillips Andover Academy, the former founded by him in 1781 and the latter founded by his nephew Samuel Phillips Jr. ... The founder of Phillips Andover Academy, his uncle was Dr. John Phillips who founded Phillips Exeter Academy. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... See also: 1877 in sports, other events of 1878, 1879 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball Harry Wright leads Boston to another pennant, once again with brother George Wright at shortstop and Andy Leonard in the outfield --six in seven years for them all, and the...


Exeter has three mottos noted on the Academy's seal: "Non Sibi" (in Latin)—"Not for oneself"- indicating a life based on community and duty, "Finis origine pendet" (in Latin)— "The end depends on the beginning"- reflecting Exeter's emphasis on hard work as preparation for a fruitful adult life, a third motto, "Χάριτι Θεου" ( in Greek)- "By the grace of God", reflects Exeter's Calvinist origins, of which the only remnant today is the Academy's requirement that most students take two courses in religion or philosophy.


Exeter's Deed of Gift, written by John Phillips at the founding of the school, warns that:

"Though goodness without knowledge is weak and feeble, yet knowledge without goodness is dangerous, and that both united form the noblest character, and lay the surest foundation of usefulness to mankind."

The Principal of the Academy speaks about this at the Academy's opening assembly every year.


The student body: "Youth from every quarter"

The Academy lays claim to a tradition of diversity. One of its unofficial mottos– "Youth from Every Quarter"– is greatly upheld today. The Director of Scholarships H. Hamilton "Hammy" Bissell (1929) worked actively to assist qualified students from all over the U.S. to attend Exeter.[6] Currently, 45 states, 26 different countries, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands are represented in the student body of the Academy. Students of non-European descent represent 38% of the Academy. (Asian 24%, Black 8%, Hispanic/Latino 6%, Native American 0.4%) Male and females each represent 50% of student body. Legacy students represent 13% of the student body. As a result of this tradition, Exeter students come from a broad range of socioeconomic origins and backgrounds. Of new students entering in 2006 (a total of 345), 54% attended public school and 46% attended private, parochial, military, home or foreign schools. Hammy Bissell (1911-2000) was a long-serving member of the faculty of the Phillips Exeter Academy. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ...


Tenth Principal Richard Ward Day also believed in the value of students studying outside of the town of Exeter, broadening a student's experience and forms of education. During Day's tenure, the Washington Intern Program and Foreign Studies Program were begun. The Academy currently sponsors trimester-long programs in Stratford, England; Grenoble, France; St. Petersburg, Russia; Göttingen, Germany; and Cuernavaca, Mexico. As a result, some of Exeter's alumni may have never even studied on the Academy's campus.


Exeter has unique statistics and classifications. Eighty-one percent of the students board, living in on-campus dormitories or houses. The remaining nineteen percent of the student body is composed of day students from the surrounding communities, and PEA has been co-educational since 1970. In 1996, a new gender-inclusive Latin inscription Hic Quaerite Pueri Puellaeque Virtutem et Scientiam ("Here, boys and girls, seek goodness and knowledge") was added over the main entrance to the Academy Building to augment the original Huc Venite, Pueri, ut Viri Sitis ("Come hither boys so that ye may become men") to reflect the school's current coeducational status. The Academy also uses a unique designation for its grades: entering first-year students are called Juniors (nicknamed "Preps"), second-years students are Lower Middle (also called "Lowers"), third-year students are Upper Middle ("Uppers"), and the Seniors continue to be called "Seniors". Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Harkness and Exeter's academics

Exeter boasts state-of-the-art facilities to accompany its renowned educational programs. Its library was designed by architect Louis Kahn during the mid 20th century. The Phelps Science Center is also impressive. However, Exeter is most famous for its adherence to the Harkness philosophy of education. Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901/1902 – March 17, 1974) was a world-renowned architect who practiced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


On April 9, 1930, philanthropist and oil magnate Edward Harkness wrote to Exeter's Principal Lewis Perry regarding how a substantial donation he had made to the Academy might be used for his vision of a new way of teaching and learning: is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Stephen Harkness (1874 - 1940) was an American philanthropist. ...

"What I have in mind is a classroom where students could sit around a table with a teacher who would talk with them and instruct them by a sort of tutorial or conference method, where each student would feel encouraged to speak up. This would be a real revolution in methods."

The result was Harkness Teaching in which a teacher and a group of students work together, exchanging ideas and information around a table, similar to the Aristotelian method of antiquity. In November 1930 Harkness provided a $5.8 million gift to support this initiative. Since then, the Academy's principal mode of instruction has been by discussion, "seminar style", around an oval table known as the Harkness Table. The completion of the Phelps Science Center in 2001 meant that all science classes, previously the only ones taught in a more conventional layout, could also be conducted around the same oval tables. Classes are small, no more than 12 students per class, to encourage all students to participate. These Harkness classes feature heavily in both the school's identity and its day-to-day life. Harkness is a symbol of the Academy and considered one of the many highlights of an Exeter education, preparing a student for how adult interaction occurs in the professional world.


Lectures at Exeter are rare; students learn from each other, guided by an instructor's questions. This is evident not only in humanities and language courses, but also in the sciences and math programs. For example, math is not taught with traditional text books. Instead, workbooks written by the faculty and some students are used. Students complete complex word problems from the workbook and present their work to the class. Students are not given theorems, model problems, or principles beforehand. Instead, these emerge from students' complementary approaches to the assigned problems. Elements of the Harkness method can now be found at academic institutions across the globe, and Phillips Exeter Academy offers 450 courses in 19 subject areas, the student to teacher ratio is 5:1, and a substantial majority of the faculty have advanced degrees in their fields.[7]


The success of the Harkness system is proven by Exeter's matriculations. For example, the classes of 2005-2007 most frequently enrolled at the following colleges: Dartmouth, Georgetown, Harvard, Penn, Princeton, Stanford, Tufts, and Yale. Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Bishop John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Harvard redirects here. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Yale redirects here. ...


Endowment

Exeter's endowment as of 5 October 2007 was $1 billion.[8] This is the second-highest endowment of any American secondary school, behind the $9.0 billion endowment of Kamehameha Schools in Hawaii,[9] and ahead of the $775 million endowment of its traditional rival, Phillips Academy. Due largely to the successful investments of the school and gifts from wealthy alumni, this school has an endowment of over $1 million per student.[10] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... Name Kamehameha Schools Address 567 South King Street, Suite 200 Town Honolulu, Hawaii Established 1887 Community Urban Type Independent Primary and Secondary Religion Protestant Students Coeducational Grades Preschool to 12 Accreditation Western Association of Schools and Colleges District Kalihi Subdistrict Alewa Hts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...


According to the New York Times, Exeter devotes an average of $63,500 annually to each of its students, an amount well above the 2007-8 annual tuition of $37,500.[11] This money is spent on, in addition to operating expenses, maintaining small classes (with a typical student-teacher ratio of no more than 12 to one), computers for students, financial aid, and maintaining two swimming pools, two hockey rinks, the largest secondary school library in the world. Exeter also ensures a high quality cafeteria, serving such meals as made-to-order omelets for breakfast. "[12]


Campus buildings and facilities

The Academy Building

Some of Phillips Exeter Academy's noted buildings on campus are discussed below: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (590x722, 186 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (590x722, 186 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...

  • Academy Building: The third of its kind, erected in 1914 after a devastating fire ruined the second example. The latest Academy Building was designed by the noted architect Ralph Adams Cram of Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson and houses the History, Math, Religion and Classical Languages departments. Two wings were added to the original structure during the great building boom of the 1920s and 1930s, orchestrated by Principal Lewis Perry. The Academy Building also houses the Assembly Hall (formerly known as the Chapel), a grand room upholstered in deep red carpeting and furnished with red upholstered seating. This was a welcome improvement from the traditional spartan style of predecessor rooms in the previous Academy Buildings: plaster walls, plain flooring, and utilitarian wooden parson benches. In former times, non-denominational, Christian religious services were conducted in the Chapel every morning Monday through Saturday before the beginning of classes and attendance was mandatory for all students in keeping with the wishes of the founders of the Academy. The bell (visible in the above photo of the Academy Building tower) was rung in a succession of rings to call the student body to worship: Ones, Twos, Threes, Fours and Fives. After Fives were rung, monitors would begin walking down the rows checking attendance on the benches. The bell continues to be rung to mark the end of classes.
The Class of 1945 Library
The Class of 1945 Library
  • Fisher Theater: Home to the Drama Department, Shakespeare Society, and the Dramatic Association (DRAMAT). Includes a blackbox theater (seats: 90) and a main stage (seats: 300).
  • Forrestal Bowld Music Center: Home to the Music Department, the Music Library, and a capella groups.
  • Mayer Art Center: Home to the Art Department and the Lamont Art Gallery.
  • Phelps Science Center - Designed by Centerbrook Architects, the state-of-the-art center facilitates Harkness instruction and provides ample laboratory and classroom space. Recipient in 2004 of American Institute of Architects New Hampshire's Honor Award for Excellence in Architecture.
  • Phelps Academy Center: Opened in the Spring of 2006, the Phelps Academy gives a center to the entire community. It is home to the new Grill, the new Post Office, the Forum (a 300 person auditorium), most student clubs including the PEAN (Phillips Exeter Annual, the student yearbook), the Exonian (Exeter's student newspaper, the oldest continuously running secondary school newspaper in the country), PEALife Magazine (PEAL), the Student Council (StuCo), and Student Activities.
  • Phillips Church (formerly the Third Congregational Church): Renovated and reopened in the winter of 2003, the building is a place of worship for students to all faiths. The building includes a Hindu shrine, a Muslim prayer room and ablutions fountain, a kosher kitchen, and a meditation room. Services that are individual to Phillips Church include Evening Prayer on Tuesday nights, Thursday Meditation, and Indaba—a religious open forum.
  • Phillips Hall: Home to the English and Modern Languages Departments. Includes the Elting Room—home to faculty meetings. Built during the tenure of Principal Lewis Perry.
  • The Boiler Plant: The Academy has its own steam-boiler operation where steam is raised and piped all over the campus, heating most of the buildings.

Ralph Adams Cram, circa 1890 Ralph Adams Cram, (December 16, 1863 - September 22, 1942), was an American architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings, often in the gothic style. ... The Phillips Exeter Academy Library at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, NH was designed by Louis Kahn and completed in 1971. ... Salk Institute, La Jolla, California Louis Isadore Kahn (February 20, 1901/1902 – March 17, 1974) was a world-renowned architect who practiced in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The Chrysler Building is an Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, located on the east side of Manhattan at the intersection of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The TWA Flight Center Building - thin-shell structure by Eero Saarinen The Union News restaurants coffee shop, TWA Flight Center, Idlewild, by Raymond Loewy. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For the regional airport in Wisconsin, see John F. Kennedy Memorial Airport. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The circled U indicates that this product is certified as kosher by the Orthodox Union (OU). ...

Dormitories

  • Abbot Hall (Oldest dormitory, named for the Second Principal Benjamin Abbot.)
  • Soule Hall (Named for the Third Principal, Gideon Lane Soule.)
  • Hoyt Hall
  • Peabody Hall
  • Dunbar Hall
  • Webster Hall (Named for distinguished alumnus Daniel Webster (1796).)
  • Lamont Hall (formerly the Lamont Infirmary Annex; named for distinguished alumnus Thomas Lamont (1888))
  • Wheelwright Hall (Named for John Wheelwright, founder of the Town of Exeter.)
  • Langdell Hall (named after Christopher Columbus Langdell)
  • Merrill Hall (named for alumnus Abner Merrill (1838) who gave the original Merrill Hall which stood on the site)
  • Bancroft Hall (Named for distinguished alumnus George Bancroft (1811).)
  • Wentworth Hall (named after George Wentworth)
  • Amen Hall (Named for the Seventh Principal, Harlan Page Amen.)
  • Cilley Hall (Named for Bradbury Longfellow Cilley, and used for filming of the movie "A Separate Peace")
  • McConnell Hall
  • Ewald Hall
  • Main Street Hall (This dormitory was not named after anyone, because all of the school's leading donors at the time wished to remain anonymous. Instead, it is named after the street it is located on.)

Benjamin Abbot (September 17, 1762-October 25, 1849) was a schoolteacher. ... Daniel Webster (January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852), was a leading American statesman during the nations antebellum era. ... Thomas William Lamont was a partner of the J.P. Morgan bank in the early 20th century, ascending to the position of chairman after J.P. Morgan, Jr. ... The text of this page is transcribed from reference #1 below. ... George Bancroft (October 3, 1800 – January 17, 1891) was an American historian and statesman. ... A Separate Peace is John Knowles first published novel, released in 1959. ...

Houses

  • Browning House
  • Dow House
  • Dutch House
  • Gould House
  • Knight House (across Front Street from Phillips Church)
  • Kirtland House (CEJM)
  • Moulton House
  • Williams House (Built in 1820, oldest dormitory facility on campus.)

(N.B. The Academy has long had a policy of moving houses around the town of Exeter and the campus.)


Tuition

Tuition to Exeter for the 2007–2008 school year is $36,500 for boarding students and $28,200 for day students, not including optional and mandatory fees. Exeter offers need-based financial aid. Beginning with the Junior (freshman) class of 2010, Exeter has offered admission aid on a need-blind basis. Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ...


On Wednesday, November 7, 2007, Principal Tyler Tingley announced that beginning in the 2008-2009 academic year, admitted students whose family income is $75,000 or less will receive a free education. [13] is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Summer school

Each summer, Phillips Exeter hosts 650 students for an intensive five-week program of Academic Study. The summer program accommodates a diverse student body typically derived from over 40 different states and dozens of foreign countries.


Exeter's summer school is divided into two programs of study: Upper School, which offers a wide variety of classes to students currently enrolled in high school who are entering grades ten through twelve as well as serving post graduates; and Access Exeter, a program for students entering grades eight and nine, which offers accelerated study in the arts, sciences and writing as well as serving as an introduction to the school itself. Access Exeter curriculum consists of five academic clusters; each cluster consists of three courses organized around a focused central theme. In addition to intense academic study, Exeter's summer school offers unique introductions to several defining characteristics of the school, including the residential prep school life, school facilities, and sports (such as crew and squash). Some of Exeter's summer school programs also gives students the opportunity to experience studies outside of Exeter's campus environment, including interactions with other top schools and students, experience with Washington D.C., and travel abroad.


Athletics

Exeter is known not only for its strong academic curriculum, but also for its competitive athletic teams. Students are required to participate in intramural or interscholastic athletic programs. The school offers 65 interscholastic teams at the Varsity and Junior Varsity level as well as 27 intramural sports squads. Other various fitness classes are also offered. The Boys' Water Polo team has won twenty-two New England prep school championships. Boys' Swimming has won fifteen of the last seventeen New England championships, placing runner-up both losing years, and the Cycling team is the defending champion. Wrestling has won the New England tournament thirteen times as well. Water polo is a team water sport. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ...


Exeter is a fixture in New England championship tournaments in nearly all sports, narrowly missing the championship in both Boys' and Girls' Soccer in 2005, and winning the New England Class A Championship in Football in 2003. In 2007, the Boys' Squash team finished second at the New England Division A Interscholastic Championship and fourth at the National High School Team Tournament. Both the Men's and Women's Cross Country Teams have become perennial powerhouses, winning the NEPSTA Championship multiple times in the past decade. The wrestling team has won more Class A and New England Prep School Wrestling Association titles than any other team, most recently winning the Class A tourney in 2007, 2003 and the New England tourney in 2001. It has also crowned a National Prep Wrestling champion, Rei Tanaka, in 1990. Both the Girls' and Boys' Ice Hockey teams have won New England Championships recently as well. Soccer redirects here. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... This article is about scholastic wrestling. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


Exeter is also known for a consistently strong and richly traditioned rowing program. In recent years the Boys' Crew took first and fourth place at the U.S. Rowing Junior National Championships in 1996 and 2002 respectively. The girls' recently took sixth place at the 2006 championships and fourth in 2007. The Boys' Crew was the first organized sport at Exeter and over its more than 100 years of competition has produced several Olympians, National Team members and numerous Division I rowers. The school's traditional athletic rival is Phillips Academy, and the annual Exeter-Andover Football game has been played with great passion since 1878. Other opponents on the sports fields include Deerfield Academy, Northfield Mount Hermon, Choate Rosemary Hall, Loomis Chaffee, Avon Old Farms, Worcester Academy, and Cushing Academy. CREW (acronym) may refer to: Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington Concurrent Read Exclusive Write, access model for Parallel Random Access Machine Coherent Radiation Emission Weapon, see Directed-energy weapon, Coined by Iain M Banks Categories: ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... A list of long-standing High School Football Rivalries: Categories: | | | ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... Northfield Mount Hermon School Northfield Mount Hermon School (NMH) is a ninth-twelfth grade private college preparatory school (secondary school) located in Northfield, Massachusetts, United States. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in historic Windsor, Connecticut, U.S. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Avon Old Farms is a single-sex boarding school for boys located in Avon, Connecticut. ... Worcester Academy is an independent coeducational preparatory school spread over 67 acres in Worcester, Massachusetts in the United States. ... Cushing Academy is a boarding school in Ashburnham, Massachusetts. ...


Exeter's seasonal athletic programs are outlined below:

Fall Interscholastic Sports

Winter Interscholastic Sports The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Soccer redirects here. ... Water polo is a team water sport. ...

Spring Interscholastic Sports This article is about the sport. ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... This article is about scholastic wrestling. ...

The athletics program utilizes many facilities including: This article is about the sport. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... CREW (acronym) may refer to: Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington Concurrent Read Exclusive Write, access model for Parallel Random Access Machine Coherent Radiation Emission Weapon, see Directed-energy weapon, Coined by Iain M Banks Categories: ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a means of transport, a form of recreation and a sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...

  • The George H. Love Gymnasium (Houses squash facilities with 10 international sized courts, one swimming pool, two basketball courts, a weight training room, sports science lab, gym offices, two hockey rinks, a training room, locker rooms and visiting team locker rooms.)
  • The Thompson Gymnasium (Gift of Col. William Boyce Thompson [1890]) (Houses a basketball court, a dance studio, one swimming pool, more visiting team locker rooms, a cycling training room and a media room.)
  • The Thompson Cage Built 1931. (Gift of Col. William Boyce Thompson [1890]) : An indoor cage (two tracks: one with a wooden surface and one with a dirt surface, an open dirt surfaced multipurposed area) with a wrestling room and gymnastics space attached.
  • 23 outdoor tennis courts
  • Ralph Lovshin Track (an outdoor, all-weather track) named for the long-serving, much loved track coach.
  • Plimpton Playing Fields (room for all the Academy's Varsity and JV sports)
  • Phelps Stadium (Used for football, lacrosse and field hockey. Has been recently converted into turf surface)
  • William G. Saltonstall Boathouse (Center of crew on campus on the Squamscott River) Named for the Ninth Principal.
  • Amos Alonzo Stagg Baseball Diamond Named for the distinguished alumnus.
  • Hilliard Lacrosse Field
  • Roger Nekton Championship Pool Named for the distinguished and long-serving former swimming and water polo coach.
  • Several miles of cross country and running trails.
  • Wrestling Practice Room

For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool (film). ... Squamscott River in 1908, Exeter, New Hampshire The Squamscott River is a tidal river about 6 miles (9. ...

Exeter's emblems

Exeter is known by two symbols: A seal depicting a river, sun and beehive- incorporating the Academy's mottos; the Lion Rampant. The former has similarities to the seal used by Phillips Academy Andover- an emblem designed by Paul Revere, and its imagery tends to be Masonic in nature. A beehive often represented the industry and cooperation of a lodge or, in this case, the studies and united efforts in support of the Academy. The Lion Rampant is a symbol derived from the Phillips family's coat of arms, thereby, making a statement that all of the Academy's alumni are part of the "Exonian family". The term Beehive can refer to several different things: Beehive (beekeeping) is a human-provided structure in which bees are induced to live and raise their young. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


School colors and the alumnus tie

There are several variants of official school colors associated with Phillips Exeter Academy that range from crimson red and white to burgundy red and silver. Black is also a color associated with the school to a lesser extent. Exeter's official school color is typically generalized as a deep red, a color associated with Harvard University and Exeter's once primary matriculation. The traditional school tie reserved for both the standard school year alumni and the summer school alumni is a burgundy red tie with alternating diagonal silver strips and diagonal rows of silver lion rampants. The alumnus' tie was typically made from a Boston manufacturer also associated with Harvard University neckware. Harvard redirects here. ...


Fraternities

The first Greek Letter Society at Phillips Exeter Academy, Pi Kappa Delta, was formed in 1870, and fraternities long played a significant role in student affairs and formed a strong bond among alumni members. By 1891, four of the Academy's most noted fraternities were established. The most prestigious group, Kappa Epsilon Pi- known by its skull and laurel wreath badge, was often fashioned as a preparatory order of Skull and Bones. Principal Fish dissolved all traditional brotherhoods during his tenure, but by 1896, six new societies were chartered along with the continued activation of Kappa Epsilon Pi. However, all of Exeter's fraternities during this period had newly appointed faculty members for strict supervision. By the 20th century, there were five extant societies, with Kappa Epsilon Pi remaining as the Academy's most prestigious fraternity. On June 8, 1946, all of Exeter's surviving fraternities were ruled to close by Exeter's administration since it was believed that all fraternities had outlived their productive usefulness on the Academy's campus. [14] A laurel wreath decorating a memorial at the Folketing, the national parliament of Denmark. ... For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Exeter in print

Several pieces of fiction mention Exeter. Some of the more significant works have been by alumni, who often change the name of the school in their works. Examples are listed below:

  • A Separate Peace: This novel by John Knowles is set at "Devon", a thinly veiled fictionalization of Exeter, in the summer of 1942. The climactic scene of the novel is set in the Ralph Adams Cram-designed Chapel.
  • A Prayer for Owen Meany: In this novel by John Irving, the protagonist/narrator, John Wheelwright, and his best friend, Owen Meany, are both day students at Gravesend Academy, modeled after Exeter. Owen writes a popular column in The Grave (modeled after The Exonian) called "The Voice", which is critical of the school administration and the Vietnam war, among other topics. Part of this book was later adapted for the movie Simon Birch, though none of the Exeter parts made it into the film.
  • The World According to Garp: In this novel by John Irving, the protagonist/narrator, T.S. Garp, is the illegitimate, only child of Jenny Fields, the school nurse at "Steering School", Irving's fictionalized name for Exeter. Young Garp grows up in Steering's infirmary, eventually attending the school and joining its wrestling team. The book was adapted into a screenplay for the film of the same name, starring Robin Williams, Glenn Close, and featuring a cameo by the author as a wrestling referee.
  • A Widow for One Year: In this novel by John Irving, Eddie O'Hare, one of the main characters of the story, is a student at Exeter. Also, Eddie's father, "Minty" O'Hare, is a teacher there, and Eddie is raised on the campus.
  • The Imaginary Girl Friend: In this collection of autobiographical essays by John Irving, both Exeter and wrestling are discussed. The dust jacket features a photo from the PEAN of the 1961 Exeter Varsity Wrestling Team.
  • Tea and Sympathy: This play by Robert Anderson (later a movie as well) treats the inner struggles of an Exeter student.
  • In Revere, in Those Days A novel by Roland Merullo, this is about a boy who, instead of attending public school in his predominantly Italian town in Massachusetts, attends Exeter and plays hockey.
  • American Psycho A novel by Bret Easton Ellis: the main character, Patrick Bateman, refers to his education at Phillips Exeter Academy before attending Harvard and Harvard Business School.

The following pieces of nonfiction mention Exeter and/or document its history. A Separate Peace is John Knowles first published novel, released in 1959. ... John Knowles (September 16, 1926 - November 29, 2001), b. ... Ralph Adams Cram, circa 1890 Ralph Adams Cram, (December 16, 1863 - September 22, 1942), was an American architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings, often in the gothic style. ... A Prayer for Owen Meany is a novel by American writer John Irving, first published in 1989. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Simon Birch is a 1998 Comedy-drama film loosely based on the novel A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving. ... The World According to Garp book cover The World According to Garp is a novel by John Irving. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... For other persons named Robin Williams, see Robin Williams (disambiguation). ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress and singer. ... A Widow for One Year book cover A Widow for One Year is a John Irving novel, released in 1998, The novel is about the lives of Ruth Cole and Eddie OHare, both novelists. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... Tea and Sympathy is a stage play by Robert Anderson that was adapted by Vincente Minnelli into a 1956 movie starring Deborah Kerr. ... There have been several well-known people named Robert Anderson, including: Robert Anderson (businessman) (1803–1896) Scots-Canadian businessman. ... For other uses, see American Psycho (disambiguation). ... Bret Easton Ellis (born March 7, 1935 in Los Angeles, California) is an American author. ... Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman Patrick Bateman is a fictional character, the protagonist and narrator of the novel American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis and its film adaptation. ...

  • The Story of Phillips Exeter (1957): A historical documentation of the Academy's history by Myron R. Williams.

Exeter in film

Exeter has also been a subject in film. Some examples are listed below:

  • A Separate Peace (1972): The movie is filmed on the Exeter campus, with the author having based the fictional Devon on his years at Exeter.
  • Trading Places (1983): Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Aykroyd) is mentioned to have attended Exeter as part of his "excellent breeding" by Mortimer Duke (Don Ameche).
  • Murder Without Motive: The Edmund Perry Story (1992): Edmund Perry, the story's protagonist, attended Exeter as a scholarship student prior to his death. The focus is on the four years he spent there and the events at the Academy which ultimately led to the tragedy.
  • Scent of a Woman (1992): Al Pacino's character mentions Exeter losing to the Baird School in football.
  • The Door in the Floor (2004): The main character is an Exeter student who moves to Martha's Vineyard to be the apprentice of an author.

A Separate Peace is John Knowles first published novel, released in 1959. ... This article is about the 1983 movie. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning Canadian/American comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... Not to be confused with former NBA player John Amaechi. ... Edmund Perry was a 17 year old Harlem resident who was shot to death by a plainclothes policeman on June 12, 1985. ... Scent of a Woman is a 1992 film which tells the story of a preparatory school student who takes a job as an assistant to an irascible blind, medically retired Army officer. ... Alfredo James Pacino (born April 25, 1940) is an Academy, Golden Globe, Tony, BAFTA, Emmy, and SAG award winning American actor who is best known for playing the roles of Tony Montana in the 1983 film Scarface and Michael Corleone in The Godfather Trilogy . ... The Door in the Floor is a 2004 film directed by Tod Williams. ...

See also

The following is a list of notable alumni from Phillips Exeter Academy. ... Phillips Exeter Academy Crew is a high school rowing program at Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. ...

References

  1. ^ Communications Office, "Facts 2006-2007: Phillips Exeter Academy," Exeter 2006
  2. ^ Echols, Edward, The Phillips Exeter Academy, A Pictorial History, Exeter Press, 1970, introduction
  3. ^ Echols, Edward p.49
  4. ^ Edward Echols p.21
  5. ^ http://www.tenschools.org/members/
  6. ^ Boston Globe, Nov. 1998.
  7. ^ http://www.exeter.edu/academics/84.aspx
  8. ^ Communications Office, "Facts 2006–2007: Phillips Exeter Academy," Exeter, 2006.
  9. ^ http://www.ksbe.edu/allpdfs/annualreport04/6_strengthening_endowment.pdf
  10. ^ "At Elite Prep Schools, College-Size Endowments", "The New York Times", January 26 2008. Accessed January 29 2008.
  11. ^ "At Elite Prep Schools, College-Size Endowments", "The New York Times", January 26 2008. Accessed January 29 2008.
  12. ^ "At Elite Prep Schools, College-Size Endowments", "The New York Times", January 26 2008. Accessed January 29 2008.
  13. ^ http://www.exeter.edu/news_and_events/news_events_9669.aspx
  14. ^ Edward Echols p. 104

is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Peoples Archive [sic] is a website which has videos of notable persons telling their life stories. ... The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the boarding school in Pennsylvania. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in historic Windsor, Connecticut, U.S. It has a total enrollment of 720, 400 boarding and 320 day students, and 150 faculty members. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or simply P.A. or Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... , This is about St. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut, USA. The School was founded by Horace Dutton Taft in 1890. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boston.com / News / Local / Mystery donor aids academy (499 words)
The recent $25 million donation to Phillips Exeter Academy by a benefactor who desires no credit is one of the largest of its kind ever bestowed upon an independent school, experts say.
Phillips Academy in Andover, Mass., ranked second, with an endowment of $569 million for its 1,083 students.
At Phillips Exeter, annual tuition is $31,600 for boarding students and $24,400 for day students.
Phillips Exeter Academy - Peterson's In-Depth Description (2638 words)
Phillips Exeter Academy is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges.
The Academy acts on the assumptions that its students enter the school with a serious purpose and that their conscience and good sense are a sufficient guide to behavior.
The multidenominational Phillips Church is the center of religious worship at Exeter, where students from eleven of the world’s religions gather to express their faith.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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