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Encyclopedia > Philippe de Vitry
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Philippe de Vitry (October 31, 1291 – June 9, 1361) was a French composer, music theorist and poet. He was the defining music theorist of the early ars nova, as well as an accomplished, innovative, and influential composer. Jump to: navigation, search October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ... Jump to: navigation, search For broader historical context, see 1290s and 13th century. ... Jump to: navigation, search June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search Events Founding of the University of Pavia, Italy. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Music theory is a set of systems for analyzing, classifying, and composing music and the elements of music. ... Poets are authors of poems, or of other forms of poetry such as dramatic verse. ... The ars nova was a stylistic period in music of the Late Middle Ages, centered in France, which encompassed the period from the publication of the Roman de Fauvel (1310 and 1314) until the death of Machaut (1377). ...


He was born in Paris. Biographical details of his life are sketchy, but he is known to have studied at the Sorbonne. Later he was prominent in the courts of Charles IV, Philippe VI and Jean II, serving as secretary and advisor. He was a diplomat as well as a soldier, and is known to have served at the siege of Aiguillon in 1346. In 1351 he became Bishop of Meaux, east of Paris. In addition, he was the older friend of the famous mathematician, philosopher and music theorist Nicole Oresme. De Vitry died in Paris. Jump to: navigation, search The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The Sorbonne is frequently used in ordinary parlance as synonymous with the faculty of theology of Paris or the University of Paris in its entirety. ... Charles IV the Fair (French: Charles IV le Bel) (1294 – February 1, 1328), a member of the Capetian Dynasty, reigned as King of France from 1322 to 1328. ... Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293–August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death. ... Jean II, a portrait painted on wood panel ca 1350 (Louvre Museum), the oldest profile portrait in Europe John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France from 1350 to 1364. ... Auguillon (French Aiguillón) is a city in France, in the Lot-et-Garonne département, Agen district, near the two rivers that give name to the département. ... // Events Serbian Empire was proclaimed in Skopje by Dusan Silni, occupying much of the South-Eastern Europe Foundation of the University of Valladolid Foundation of Pembroke College, University of Cambridge August 26 Battle of Crecy after which Edward the Black Prince honored the bravery of John I, Count of Luxemburg... Events End of the reign of Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Start of the reign of Emperor Go-Kogon of Japan, fourth of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders May 1 Zürich joins the Swiss Confederation. ... Meaux is a town in the Seine-et-Marne département of France, near the Marne River. ... Nicolas Oresme (c. ...


Vitry is most famous in music history for writing the Ars Nova (1322), a treatise on music, which gave its name to the music of the entire era. His contributions to notation, in particular notation of rhythm, were particularly important, and made possible the free and quite complex music of the next hundred years. In some ways the modern system of rhythmic notation began with Vitry, who broke free from the older idea of the rhythmic modes, patterns which were repeated without being individually notated. The notational predecessors of modern time meters also originate in the Ars Nova. Jump to: navigation, search Events September 27/September 28 - Battle of Ampfing, often called the last battle of knights, in which Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor defeats Frederick I of Austria Births January 11 - Emperor Komyo of Japan (died 1380) Deaths January 3 - King Philip V of France (born 1293... The term notation can be used in several contexts. ... Rhythm (Greek ρυθμός = tempo) is the variation of the duration of sounds or other events over time. ... In medieval music, the rhythmic modes were patterns of long and short durations (or rhythms) imposed on written notes which otherwise appeared to be identical. ...


Vitry wrote chansons and motets, but only the motets have survived. Unlike the music of many of his contemporaries, each motet is strikingly individual, exploring a unique structural idea. Vitry is also often credited with developing the concept of isorhythm (an isorhythmic line is one which has repeating patterns of rhythms and pitches, but the patterns overlap rather than correspond—for example a line of thirty consecutive notes might contain five repetitions of a six-note melody, and six repetitions of a five-note rhythm). Chanson is a French word for song, and in English-language contexts is often applied to any song with French words, particularly a cabaret song. ... In Western music, motet is a word that is applied to a number of highly varied choral musical compositions. ... Isorhythm (iso or same) consists of an order of durations or rhythms, talea (cutting, plural taleae), which is repeated within a tenor melody whose pitch content or series, color (repetition), varied in the number of members from the talea. ...


He was widely acknowledged as the greatest musician of his day, and even Petrarch wrote a glowing tribute of him: "...he is the great philosopher and truth-seeker of our age." From the c. ...


References and further reading

  • Ernest H. Sanders, "Philippe de Vitry", in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie. 20 vol. London, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 1980. ISBN 1561591742
  • Richard H. Hoppin, Medieval Music. New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 1978. ISBN 0393090906

  Results from FactBites:
 
Philippe de Vitry - definition of Philippe de Vitry in Encyclopedia (327 words)
Later he was prominent in the courts of Charles IV, Philippe VI and Jean II, serving as secretary and adviser.
Vitry is most famous in music history for writing the Ars Nova (1322), a treatise on music, which gave its name to the music of the entire era.
Vitry also pioneered the concept of isorhythm (an isorhythmic line is one which has repeating patterns of rhythms and pitches, but the patterns overlap rather than correspond--for example a line of thirty consecutive notes might contain five repetitions of a six-note melody, and six repetitions of a five-note rhythm).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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