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Encyclopedia > Philippe de Monte

Philippe de Monte (1521July 4, 1603) was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance.[1] He wrote more madrigals than any other composer of the time.[2] Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Flanders (disambiguation). ... Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... A madrigal is a setting for two or more voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ...

Contents

Life

He was born in Mechelen. After boyhood musical training in St. Rumbolds Cathedral in Mechelen, where he was a choirboy, Monte went to Italy — a common destination for a young Flemish composer in the sixteenth century — where he made a name for himself as a composer, singer, and teacher.[3] He lived and worked in Naples for awhile,and in Rome, in the employ of Cardinal Orsini, although he was in England for a brief period, 1554-1555, during the reign of Queen Mary I, while she was married to King Philip II of Spain.[4] Monte reported that he disliked working in Philips's choir since all the other members were Spaniards.[5] Mechelen: Grote Markt square, with St. ... St. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Location of the city of Naples (red dot) within Italy. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ...



In 1568 Monte was appointed as successor to Jacobus Vaet as Kapellmeister to the chapel of Maximilian II.,[6] He was successful at recruiting new musicians to the chapel, for Lassus himself noted the astonishing quality of music-making in Vienna just two years after Monte became leader there.[7] Monte worked for the remainder of his long life in Habsburg courts both in Vienna and Prague.[8] He died in Prague in 1603.[9] Jacobus Vaet (c. ... Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II. His Coat of Arms Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor of the Habsburg dynasty (July 31, 1527 – October 12, 1576) was king of Bohemia from 1562, king of Hungary from 1563 and emperor of the Holy Roman Empire from 1564 until his death. ... Composer Orlande de Lassus Orlande de Lassus (also Orlandus Lassus, Orlando di Lasso, Roland de Lassus, or Roland Delattre) (1532 (possibly 1530) – June 14, 1594) was a Franco-Flemish composer of late Renaissance music. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ...


Music and influence

Monte was a hugely prolific composer,[10] and wrote both sacred and secular music, all of it vocal.[11] He wrote about 40 masses and about 260 other sacred pieces, including motets and madrigali spirituali (works differing only from madrigals in that they have sacred texts).[12] He published over 1100 secular madrigals,[13] in 34 books, but not all of them survive.[14] His first publication was in 1554 when he was 33.[15] This article discusses the Mass as a standard form of classical music composition. ... In Western music, motet is a word that is applied to a number of highly varied choral musical compositions. ... A madrigale spirituale (Italian; pl. ... A madrigal is a setting for two or more voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ...


Stylistically, Monte's madrigals vary from an early, very progressive style with frequent use of chromaticism to express the text (though he not quite as experimental in this regard as Marenzio or Lassus), to a late style which was much simplified, featuring short motifs and frequent homophonic textures.[16] Unlike Monteverdi, who began in a conservative style and became experimental later in life, Monte's compositional career had an opposite curve, progressing from experimentation to unity and simplicity in his later works.[17] In music, chromatic indicates the inclusion of notes not in the prevailing scale and is also used for those notes themselves (Shir-Cliff et al 1965, p. ... Luca Marenzio (1553? - August 22, 1599) was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance. ... Composer Orlande de Lassus Orlande de Lassus (also Orlandus Lassus, Orlando di Lasso, Roland de Lassus, or Roland Delattre) (1532 (possibly 1530) – June 14, 1594) was a Franco-Flemish composer of late Renaissance music. ... In music, the word texture is often used in a rather vague way in reference to the overall sound of a piece of music. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


Philippe de Monte was renowned all over Europe; editions of his music were printed, reprinted, and widely circulated.[18] He has been described as "a quiet, unassuming man, gentle as a girl."[19] He had many students, thereby passing on his compositional skills and experience to the generation who developed the early Baroque style; and many of his madrigals are still performed today. Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ...


References

  • Bergquist, Peter. “Philipp de Monte (1521-1603).” Music and Letters 86/1 (Fall 2005): 106-9. H.W. Wilson Company. Database online. Wilson Web; accessed October 31, 2007.
  • Brown, Howard M., and Louise K. Stein. Music in the Renaissance, 2nd ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1999.
  • Mann, Brian. The Secular Madrigals of Filippo di Monte: 1521-1603. Michigan: UMI Research Press, 1983.
  • Marshall, Melanie L. “The Poetry of Monte’s Madrigals.” Early Music 34 no 2 (May 2006): 292-3. H.W. Wilson Company. Database online. Wilson Web; accessed October 31, 2007.
  • Reese, Gustave. Music in the Renaissance: Revised Edition. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1954.
  • "Philippe de Monte” in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 2nd ed. Stanley Sadie, ed. London: Macmillan, 2001.

Notes

  1. ^ Philippe 2001, p.16.
  2. ^ Philippe 2001, p.18.
  3. ^ Philippe 2001, p.16.
  4. ^ Philippe 2001, p.16.
  5. ^ Reese 1954, p.395.
  6. ^ Philippe 2001, p.16.
  7. ^ Philippe 2001, p.17.
  8. ^ Philippe 2001, p.18.
  9. ^ Reese 1954, p.395.
  10. ^ Reese 1954, p.406.
  11. ^ Philippe 2001, p.17.
  12. ^ Philippe 2001, p.17,18.
  13. ^ Reese 1954, p.406.
  14. ^ Philippe 2001, p.18.
  15. ^ Philippe 2001, p.19.
  16. ^ Philippe 2001, p.18,19.
  17. ^ Philippe 2001, p.18.
  18. ^ Philippe 2001, p.20.
  19. ^ Reese 1954, p.395.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Philippe de Monte (1151 words)
Philippe de Monte, a renowned Flemish composer of the sixteenth century, is particularly known for his secular compositions.
Monte occasionally indulges in changes of vocal "orchestration" within two voices, departing, after paired imitation has begun, from the inner voice part, or departing from the primary voice part while the inner part assumes the melodic material originally given the primary part.
Monte frequently "develops" the subject matter from the model through changing of pitch level, overlapping one subject over another, inversion of subjects, extracting a single voice line to become the basis for a relatively large section of a mass, expanding or decreasing the number of voices for which the mass is written, and other methods.
Philippe de Monte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (518 words)
Philippe de Monte (1521 – July 4, 1603) was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance.
He lived and worked in Naples from 1543 to 1551, and in Rome, in the employ of Cardinal Orsini, until 1568, although he was in England for a brief period, 1554-1555, during the reign of Queen Mary I, while she was married to King Philip II of Spain.
In 1568 Monte was appointed as successor to Jacobus Vaet as Kapellmeister to the chapel of Maximilian II.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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