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Encyclopedia > Philip Marlowe
Ed Bishop had the title role in BBC Radio's The Adventures of Philip Marlowe.
Ed Bishop had the title role in BBC Radio's The Adventures of Philip Marlowe.

Philip Marlowe is a fictional private detective created by Raymond Chandler in a series of detective novels including The Big Sleep and The Long Goodbye. Marlowe first appeared in The Big Sleep, published in 1939. Marlowe appeared in none of Chandler's early short stories, though many of his early stories were republished years later with the names of the protagonists changed to Philip Marlowe; this change was presumably made with the approval of Chandler. Image File history File links Bbcmarlowe. ... Image File history File links Bbcmarlowe. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Raymond Chandler Raymond Thornton Chandler (July 23, 1888 – March 26, 1959) was an author of crime stories and novels. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and one filmed in 1978. ... The Long Goodbye (ISBN 0394757688) is a 1954 novel by Raymond Chandler, centered on his famous detective Philip Marlowe. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and one filmed in 1978. ...


Philip Marlowe's character is foremost within the genre of hardboiled crime fiction that originated in the 1920s, most notably in Black Mask magazine, in which Dashiell Hammett's The Continental Op and Sam Spade first appeared. The private eye is a pessimistic and cynical observer of a corrupt society, yet the enduring appeal of Marlowe and other hardboiled detectives lies in their tarnished idealism. Hardboiled crime fiction is a uniquely American style pioneered by Dashiell Hammett, refined by Raymond Chandler, and endlessly imitated since by writers such as Mickey Spillane. ... Sherlock Holmes, pipe-puffing hero of crime fiction, confers with his colleague Dr. Watson; together these characters popularized the genre. ... For information on Black Mask, the surrealist group, see Black Mask (NYC). ... Samuel Dashiell Hammett (May 27, 1894 – January 10, 1961) was an American author of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. ... The Continental Op is a fictional character created by Dashiell Hammett. ... Poster of the 1941 Warner Brothers film version of The Maltese Falcon, directed by John Huston Sam Spade was the leading character in the novel and movie The Maltese Falcon (1931). ...


Underneath the wisecracking, hard drinking, tough private eye, Marlowe is quietly contemplative and philosophical. He enjoys chess and poetry. While he is not afraid to risk physical harm, he does not dish out violence merely to settle scores. Morally upright, he is not bamboozled by the genre's usual femme fatales, like Carmen Sternwood in The Big Sleep. As Chandler wrote about his detective ideal in general, "I think he might seduce a duchess, and I am quite sure he would not spoil a virgin." This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and one filmed in 1978. ...


Chandler's treatment of the detective novel exhibits a continuing effort to develop the art form. His first full length book, The Big Sleep, was published when Chandler was 51; his last, Playback, when he was 70. All seven novels were produced in the last two decades of his life. All maintain the integrity of Philip Marlowe's character, but each novel has unique qualities of narrative tone, depth and focus that set it apart from the others. Playback could mean: Playback singing, a practice in Bollywood musicals. ...

Contents

Biographical notes for Philip Marlowe

In a letter to D. J. Ibberson, written April 19, 1951, Chandler noted among other things that Marlowe is 38 years old and was born in Santa Rosa, California. He had a couple of years at college and some experience as an investigator for an insurance company and the district attorney of Los Angeles county. April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center Luther Burbank Gardens, part of California Historical Landmark No. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


Marlowe is slightly over six feet (about 185 centimeters) tall and weighs about 190 pounds (86.2 kilograms / thirteen stone eight). His office is number 615 on the 6th floor of the Cahuenga Building, which is located on Hollywood Boulevard near Ivar. North Ivar Avenue is between North Cahuenga Boulevard to the west and Vine Street to the east. The office telephone number is GLenview 7537. cm redirects here, alternate uses: cm (disambiguation) A centimetre (symbol cm; American spelling: centimeter) is an SI unit of length. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... The stone is a unit of mass in the Imperial system of weights and measures used in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and most Commonwealth countries. ...


He smokes and prefers Camels. Camel is a brand of cigarettes introduced by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco (RJR) in 1913. ...


He drinks whiskey or brandy frequently and in relatively large quantities. For example, in The High Window, he gets out a bottle of Four Roses, and pours glasses of the blended American whiskey for himself, for Det Lt Breeze and for Spangler. At other times he is drinking Old Forester, a Kentucky bourbon: "I hung up and fed myself a slug of Old Forester to brace my nerves for the interview. As I was inhaling it I heard her steps tripping along the corridor." (The Little Sister) Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... Brandy pot stills at the Van Ryn Brandy Cellar near Stellenbosch, South Africa Brandy (short for brandywine, from Dutch brandewijn—burning wine) is a general term for distilled wine, usually 40–60% ethyl alcohol by volume. ... The High Window is a 1942 novel written by Raymond Chandler. ... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... The Little Sister is a novel by Raymond Chandler, starring his famous fictional detective Philip Marlowe. ...


But while Marlowe is a hard-drinking hero, he is far from being any kind of alcoholic. Rather, he is adept at using liquor to loosen the tongues of people from whom* he needs to extract information. (*Degarmo: "Did he say 'whom'?" Marlowe: "Yeah, but don't hit him. There is such a word." - The Lady in the Lake) An example is in The High Window, when Marlowe finally persuades the detective-lieutenant, whose "solid old face was lined and grey with fatigue", to take a drink and thereby loosen up and give out. "Breeze looked at me very steadily. Then he sighed. Then he picked the glass up and tasted it and sighed again and shook his head sideways with a half smile; the way a man does when you give him a drink and he needs it very badly and it is just right and the first swallow is like a peek into a cleaner, sunnier, brighter world." The Lady in the Lake is a 1943 detective novel by Raymond Chandler featuring — as do all his major works — the Los Angeles private investigator Philip Marlowe. ... The High Window is a 1942 novel written by Raymond Chandler. ...


He makes good coffee, eschewing the use of filters (see Farewell My Lovely). He takes his coffee with cream in the mornings, but has it black at other times.


At the time of writing he was probably carrying a Smith and Wesson .38 special with a four-inch barrel. Smith & Wesson is Americas largest manufacturer of handguns, located in Springfield, Massachusetts. ...


See also Raymond Chandler, "Novels and Other Writings" (Library of America, 1995, ISBN 1-883011-08-6) for other letters. The Library of America is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...


Influences and adaptations

Marlowe's name may derive from the Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe, author of Doctor Faustus; or from Marlow, a narrator found in Joseph Conrad fiction including the novel Heart of Darkness; or from the name of Chandler's house, Marlowe (itself named after the dramatist), at Dulwich College; from some combination of these three; or from none of the above. The Elizabethan Era is the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558 - 1603) and is often considered to be a golden age in English history. ... An anonymous portrait in Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, often believed to show Christopher Marlowe. ... Doctor Faustus could refer to: The character of Faust Christopher Marlowes The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus Thomas Manns Doktor Faustus Ferruccio Busonis opera Doktor Faust A 1967 film directed by Richard Burton and Nevill Coghill, see Doctor Faustus (movie) This is a disambiguation page — a... Joseph Conrad. ... Heart of Darkness is a novella by Joseph Conrad. ... Dulwich New College buildings. ...


Marlowe has been played on the screen by Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery, George Montgomery, Robert Mitchum, Dick Powell, Elliot Gould, Danny Glover, James Garner, and James Caan. In radio, in The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, the character was portrayed by Van Heflin on NBC (17 June9 September 1947) and by Gerald Mohr on CBS (26 September 194815 September 1951). [1] Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an iconic American actor of legendary fame who retained his legacy after death. ... Robert Montgomery (May 21, 1904 – September 27, 1981) was an American actor and director. ... George Montgomery (August 29, 1916 - December 12, 2000) was an American painter, sculptor, furniture craftsman, and stuntman who is best known as an actor in western style film and television. ... Robert Mitchum in Cape Fear Robert Charles Durman Mitchum (August 6, 1917 – July 1, 1997) was an American film actor and singer. ... Dick Powell (1904-1963) The singer, actor, producer, and director Dick Powell was born as Richard Ewing Powell in Mountain View, Arkansas on November 14, 1904. ... Elliott Gould (born August 29, 1938), born Elliott Goldstein, was one of the most prominent American film actors in the early 70s, best known for playing Trapper John in the satirical 1970 film M*A*S*H. Time magazine put him on its cover in 1970, when he was at... Danny Glover at World Social Forum 2003. ... James Garner (born Norman, Oklahoma, April 7, 1928) is an American film and television actor of partially Cherokee Indian descent. ... James Edmund Caan[1] (born March 26, 1940 in The Bronx, New York) is an Academy Award, Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated American film, stage and television actor. ... Actors Arlene Dahl and Van Heflin in Womans World Emmett Evan Heflin Jr. ... It has been suggested that NBC, NBC Radio City Studios, NBC Studios be merged into this article or section. ... June 17 is the 168th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (169th in leap years), with 197 days remaining. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Gerald Mohr (June 11, 1914 - November 9, 1968) was a film actor who appeared in over sixty films and guest starring in dozens of television programs. ... CBS (an abbreviation for Columbia Broadcasting System, its former legal name) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


Powers Boothe had the title role in the HBO series, Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, which ran from 1984 to 1986. Ed Bishop portrayed Marlowe in BBC Radio's The Adventures of Philip Marlowe.[1] Powers Allen Boothe (born June 1, 1948) is an American television and film actor, perhaps best known for his 1980 Emmy-winning portrayal of Jim Jones. ... HBO (Home Box Office) is an American premium cable television network with headquarters in New York City. ... BBC Radio is a service of the British Broadcasting Corporation which has operated in the United Kingdom under the terms of a Royal Charter since 1927. ...


Marlowe has proved such a complex and attractive character that he has appeared in short stories and novels by writers other than Chandler, such as Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe: A Centennial Celebration (1988). The central character in the original TV version of Dennis Potter's The Singing Detective is crime novelist Philip E. Marlow (portrayed by Michael Gambon). The female sleuths of the anthology Tart Noir (Berkeley, 2002) are described as "half Philip Marlowe, half femme fatale". Liber Amoris Dennis Christopher George Potter (17 May 1935—7 June 1994) was a controversial British dramatist who is best known for several widely acclaimed television dramas which mixed fantasy and reality, the personal and the social. ... The Singing Detective The Singing Detective was a 1986 BBC television miniseries, written by Dennis Potter and starring Michael Gambon. ... Michael Gambon in Charlotte Gray, (2001) Sir Michael John Gambon, CBE (born October 19, 1940), is an acclaimed Irish-born British actor who has worked in television, film and theatre. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Marlowe bibliography

Works by Raymond Chandler

  • "Finger Man" (1934), short story)- This story originally featured an unnamed narrator, identified as "Carmady" in subsequent stories, and later renamed Marlowe for book publication.
  • "Goldfish" (1936), (short story) - This story originally featured Carmady, later renamed Marlowe for book publication.
  • "Red Wind" (1938), (short story) - This story originally featured John Dalmas, later renamed Marlowe for book publication.
  • "Trouble Is My Business" (1939) (short story) - This story originally featured John Dalmas, later renamed Marlowe for book publication.
  • The Big Sleep (1939)
  • Farewell, My Lovely (1940)
  • The High Window (1942)
  • The Lady in the Lake (1943)
  • The Little Sister (1949)
  • The Simple Art of Murder (1950) (short story collection)
  • The Long Goodbye (1954)
  • Playback (1958)
  • Poodle Springs (left unfinished at Chandler's death in 1959; completed by Robert B. Parker, 1989)
  • "The Pencil" (aka "Marlowe Takes On the Syndicate," "Wrong Pigeon," and "Philip Marlowe's Last Case") (1959), (short story) - Chandler's last completed work about Marlowe, his first Marlowe short story in more than twenty years, and the first short story originally written about Marlowe.

This article is in need of attention. ... The Big Sleep is a 1939 novel by Raymond Chandler, with two film versions, one filmed in 1946, and one filmed in 1978. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Farewell, My Lovely (film). ... The High Window is a 1942 novel written by Raymond Chandler. ... The Lady in the Lake is a 1943 detective novel by Raymond Chandler featuring — as do all his major works — the Los Angeles private investigator Philip Marlowe. ... The Little Sister is a novel by Raymond Chandler, starring his famous fictional detective Philip Marlowe. ... The Simple Art of Murder is an essay by Raymond Chandler on the art of detective fiction. ... The Long Goodbye (ISBN 0394757688) is a 1954 novel by Raymond Chandler, centered on his famous detective Philip Marlowe. ... Playback is the final, complete novel by Raymond Chandler to feature his iconic creation Philip Marlowe. ... Poodle Springs is the eighth Philip Marlowe novel. ... Robert B. Parkers novel Cold Service Robert B. Parker (born September 17, 1932) is an acclaimed American writer of detective fiction. ...

Works by others

  • Triste, solitario y final (by Osvaldo Soriano, 1974. Marlowe appears as a secondary character of the novel)
  • Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe: a Centennial Celebration (collection of short stories by other writers, ed. Byron Preiss, 1988, ISBN 1-59687-847-9, and 1999, ISBN 0-671-03890-7, with two new stories)
  • Poodle Springs (by Robert B. Parker, 1990, Parker's completion of a manuscript Chandler left unfinished when he died)
  • Perchance to Dream (by Robert B. Parker, 1991, written as a sequel to Chandler's The Big Sleep)
  • Orange Curtain (by John Shannon; Marlowe appears in retirement as a real person used as the model for Chandler's novels)

Byron Preiss (born 1953 in Brooklyn, New York, died July 9, 2005 in Long Island, New York) was an American writer, editor and publisher, and founded and served as president of Byron Preiss Visual Publications which developed projects for various publishing houses, and was also the founder of ibooks. ...

See also

Sherlock Holmes, pipe-puffing hero of crime fiction, confers with his colleague Dr. Watson; together these characters popularized the genre. ...

Reference

    1. ^ Terrace, Vincent [1999]. Radio Programs, 1924-1984:A Catalog of Over 1800 Shows. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. ISBN 0-7864-0351-9.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Philip Marlowe at AllExperts (889 words)
Marlowe appeared in none of Chandler's early short stories, though many of his early stories were republished years later with the names of the protagonists changed to Philip Marlowe; this change was presumably made with the approval of Chandler.
Philip Marlowe's character is foremost within the genre of hardboiled crime fiction that originated in the 1920s, most notably in Black Mask magazine, in which Dashiell Hammett's The Continental Op and Sam Spade first appeared.
In radio, in The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, the character was portrayed by Van Heflin on NBC (June 17-September 9, 1947) and by Gerald Mohr on CBS (September 26, 1948-September 15, 1951).
Philip Marlowe (126 words)
Philip Marlowe is a detective of the 'hardboiled genre' created by Raymond Chandler.
Marlowe's character is typical of this new age of crime fiction which is based on a pessimistic view of the world—that the society in general is corrupt.
Marlowe is presented as a wisecracking, street wise, tough private dick out to earn a living.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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