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Encyclopedia > Philip Larkin
Philip Arthur Larkin,
CH CBE
Philip Larkin
Born August 9, 1922(1922-08-09)
Flag of England Coventry, Warwickshire, UK
Died December 2, 1985 (aged 63)
Hull, Humberside, UK
Occupation Poet, Novelist, Jazz critic, Poet Laureate (declined)

Philip Arthur Larkin, CH, CBE, FRSL, (9 August 19222 December 1985) was an English poet, novelist and jazz critic. He spent his working life as a university librarian and was offered the Poet Laureateship following the death of John Betjeman, but declined the post. Larkin is commonly regarded as one of the greatest English poets of the latter half of the twentieth century. In 2003 Larkin was chosen as the "nation's best-loved poet" in a survey by the Poetry Book Society [1]. The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... The Precinct in Coventry city centre. ... A detailed map Stratford-upon-Avon Kenilworth Castle Warwickshire (pronounced //, //, or //) is a landlocked non-metropolitan county in central England. ... December 2 is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... East Yorkshire Holderness Kingston upon Hull Beverley Boothferry Scunthorpe Glanford Great Grimsby Cleethorpes The Arms of Humberside County Council Humberside was a non-metropolitan county of England from April 1, 1974 until April 1, 1996. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... The Order of the Companions of Honour is a British and Commonwealth Order. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions, in order of seniority: Knight or Dame Grand Cross... The Royal Society of Literature is the senior literary organisation in Britain. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... December 2 is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the Queen England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Unified  -  by Athelstan 967 AD  Area  -  Total 130,395 km²  50,346 sq mi  Population  -  2007 estimate 50... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Librarian, a 1556 painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo A librarian is an information professional trained in library science and information science: the organization and management of information and service to people with information needs. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are several uses of the word survey, relating to two primary meanings: land surveying; and statistical surveys of people or other items, such as animals, organisations, or messages. ...


Larkin was born to Sydney and Eva Larkin in Coventry, a large provincial city in the English Midlands. He was educated at King Henry VIII School in Coventry, and St John's College, Oxford where he met Kingsley Amis, a lifelong friend and frequent correspondent. In late 1943, soon after graduating from Oxford, he applied for, and was appointed to, the position of municipal librarian at Wellington, Shropshire. In 1946, he became assistant librarian at University College, Leicester (Kingsley Amis got his idea for Lucky Jim on visiting Larkin and seeing the common room of Leicester University). In March 1955, Larkin became librarian at the University of Hull, a position he retained until his death. The Precinct in Coventry city centre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... King Henry VIII School is an independent school comprising a senior school (ages 11–18) and associated junior school (ages 7–11) located in Coventry, England. ... College name St Johns College Collegium Divi Joannis Baptistae Named after Saint John the Baptist Established 1555 Sister College Sidney Sussex College President Sir Michael Scholar KCB JCR President Rhys Jones Undergraduates 381 Graduates 184 Homepage Boatclub St Johns College is one of the constituent colleges of the... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Map sources for Wellington, Shropshire at grid reference SJ6411 Wellington is a town in Shropshire, England and now forms part of the New Town of Telford. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... University of Leicester seen from Victoria Park - Left to right: the Department of Engineering, the Attenborough tower, the Charles Wilson building. ... Christine (Sharon Acker) and Jim (Ian Carmichael) in a cab Lucky Jim is a comic novel written by Kingsley Amis, first published in 1954. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ...

Contents

Career

Larkin's early work shows the influence of Yeats, but his later poetic identity was influenced mainly by Thomas Hardy. He is well known for his use of colloquial language in his poetry, partly balanced by a similarly antique word choice. With fine use of enjambement and rhyme, his poetry is highly structured, but never rigid. Death and fatalism were recurring themes and subjects of his poetry; "Aubade" being an example of this. The Less Deceived, published in 1955, marked Larkin as an up-and-coming poet. He was for a time associated with "The Movement". W.B. Yeats in Dublin on 24 January 1908. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) — an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement — delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Enjambement is the breaking of a syntactic unit (a phrase, clause, or sentence) by the end of a line or between two verses. ... A rhyme is a repetition of identical or similar terminal sounds in two or more different words (i. ... Look up Aubade in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Movement was a term coined by J. D. Scott, literary editor of the Spectator, in 1954 to describe a group of writers including Kingsley Amis, Philip Larkin, Donald Alfred Davie, D.J. Enright, John Wain, Elizabeth Jennings and Robert Conquest. ...


The publication of The Whitsun Weddings in 1964 confirmed his reputation. The title poem is a masterly depiction of England seen from a train on Whitsun. In 1972 he wrote the oft-quoted "Going, Going", a poem which expresses the romantic fatalism in his view of England which was typical of his later years. In it, he prophesies a complete destruction of the countryside, and expresses an idealised sense of national togetherness and identity. The poem ends with the doom-laden statement, "I just think it will happen, soon". High Windows, his last book, was released in 1974; for some critics it represented a falling-off from his previous two books,[1] yet it contains a number of his much-loved pieces, including "This Be The Verse" and "The Explosion", as well as the title poem. "Annus Mirabilis" (year of wonder), also from that volume, contains the frequently quoted observation that sexual intercourse began in 1963 ("rather late for me"). The Whitsun Weddings is a book of poems by Philip Larkin. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The word Whitsun is another name for Pentecost It has that meaning in the following: Whitsun, a poem by Sylvia Plath The Whitsun Weddings, a poem by Philip Larkin A Whitsun Ale (esp. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Theological fatalism be merged into this article or section. ... High Windows is a collection of poems by English poet Philip Larkin, and was published in 1974 by Faber and Faber Limited. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... This Be The Verse is a short poem by the English poet Philip Larkin (1922–1985). ... Annus Mirabilis is a Latin expression which means miraculous year. ...


Besides poetry, Larkin published two novels, Jill (1946) and A Girl in Winter (1947), and several essays. Larkin was also a major contributor to the re-evaluation of the poetry of Thomas Hardy, which had been ignored in comparison to his work as a novelist. Hardy received the longest selection in Larkin's idiosyncratic and controversial anthology, The Oxford Book of Twentieth-Century English Verse (1973). This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) — an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement — delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... The Oxford Book of Twentieth Century English Verse was a poetry anthology edited by Philip Larkin, and published in 1973 by Oxford University Press with ISBN 0198121377. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ...


Larkin was by contrast a notable critic of modernism in contemporary art and literature; his scepticism is at its most nuanced and illuminating in Required Writing, a collection of his book reviews and essays; it is at its most inflamed and polemical in his introduction to his collected jazz reviews, All What Jazz, 126 record-review columns he wrote for the Daily Telegraph between 1961 and 1971, which contains an attack on modern jazz that widens into a wholesale critique of modernism in the arts. For Modernism in an American context, see American modernism. ...


On the death of John Betjeman, Larkin was offered the post of Poet Laureate, but declined it. Larkin, who never married, died of oesophageal cancer, aged 63, and is buried at the Cottingham Municipal Cemetery near Hull. A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for state occasions and other government events. ... Cottingham is a village and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ...


Larkin's career-long companion and muse was the academic Monica Jones. She and Larkin had a holiday cottage at Haydon Bridge where they spent many happy summers together. Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... Margaret Monica Beale Jones (22 May 1922 – 15 February 2001) was an English academic and career-long companion to poet Philip Larkin. ... Haydon Bridge is a small village in Northumberland in England, with a population of around 2000 people. ...


Legacy

Larkin's posthumous reputation was affected by the publication of Andrew Motion's Philip Larkin: A Writer's Life (1993) and an edition of his letters (1992), which revealed his obsessions with pornography, his racism, his increasing shift to the political right wing, and his habitual expressions of venom and spleen. These revelations have been dismissed by the author and critic Martin Amis (son of Kingsley Amis), who argues that the letters in particular show nothing more than a tendency for Larkin to tailor his words according to the recipient, rather than representing Larkin's true opinions. Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... Pornographic movies Pornography (Porn) (from Greek πόρνη (porne) prostitute and γραφή (grafe) writing), more informally referred to as porn or porno, is the explicit representation of the human body or sexual activity with the goal of sexual arousal. ... Because racism carries connotations of race-based bigotry, prejudice, violence, oppression, stereotyping or discrimination, the term has varying and often hotly contested definitions. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ...


Despite controversy about his personal life and opinions, he remains one of Britain's most popular poets; three of his poems, "This Be The Verse", "The Whitsun Weddings" and "An Arundel Tomb," featured in the "Nation's Top 100 Poems" as voted for by viewers of the BBC's Bookworm in 1995 [2]. Media interest in Larkin has increased in the twenty-first century. His poem At Grass is featured in one Anthology booklet of the GCSE English exam, and Afternoons appears in another, Best Words. Larkin's The Whitsun Weddings collection is one of the available poetry texts in the AQA English Literature A Level syllabus, whilst High Windows is offered by the OCR board and An Arundel Tomb in the Edexcel board Poetry Anthology. The Larkin Society was formed in 1995, ten years after the poet's death; its president is Anthony Thwaite, one of Larkin's literary executors. This Be The Verse is a short poem by the English poet Philip Larkin (1922–1985). ... The Whitsun Weddings is a collection of 32 poems by Philip Larkin. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Bookworm can refer to: The insect of that name. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... AQA logo The Assessment and Qualifications Alliance, or AQA, is the largest exam board in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students in the final two years of secondary education (commonly called the Sixth Form), or in College (not to be mistaken with the college term some countries such as... The OCR (Oxford, Cambridge and RSA {Royal Society of Arts}) exam board is a British organisation that sets examinations and awards qualifications (including GCSEs and A-levels). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Anthony Simon Thwaite (born 1930) is a British poet and writer. ... A literary executor is a person with decision-making power in respect of the literary estate of an author who has died. ...


In 1964 Larkin was interview by Sir John Betjeman for the BBC programme Monitor: Philip Larkin meets John Betjeman [3]. The film, together with the original rushes is stored the Larkin archive at the University of Hull [4]. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Sir John Betjeman (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was a British poet and writer on architecture. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Rushes refers to the raw, unedited footage shot during the making of a motion picture. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ...


Larkin was the subject of the South Bank Show in 1982 [5]. Larkin did not appear on camera although Melvyn Bragg, in his introduction to the programme, stressed the poet had given his full cooperation. The programme featured contributions from Kingsley Amis, Andrew Motion and Alan Bennett. Bennett read several of Larkin's works on an edition of "Poetry in Motion", broadcast by Channel 4 in 1990 [6]. The South Bank Show is a British television arts magazine show, presented by Melvyn Bragg and seen in over 60 countries — including Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden and the USA. Its stated aim is to bring both high art and popular culture to a mass audience. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... Poetry in Motion is a 1982 documentary directed by Ron Mann featuring contemporary North American poetry and music. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ...


In his acclaimed play The History Boys Bennett would quote from Larkin's MCMXIV and the character of the Headmaster, a geography graduate from Hull, referred to Larkin as 'the Himmler of the accessions desk' [7]. The History Boys is a play by English playwright Alan Bennett. ... Heinrich Himmler Heinrich Himmler (October 7, 1900 - May 23, 1945) was the commander of the German Schutzstaffel and one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany. ...


Manic Street Preachers included a quotation from Larkin on the sleeve of their 1992 debut album Generation Terrorists and in 1993 Terry Eagleton subjected Larkin to a critical mauling on Without Walls: J'accuse Philip Larkin [8]. This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Generation Terrorists is the debut album by Welsh rock band Manic Street Preachers released on February 10 1992. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ...


In 2002 Sir Tom Courtenay debuted [9] his one-man play Pretending to Be Me at the West Yorkshire Playhouse [10] before transferring the production to the Comedy Theatre in London's West End. An audio recording was released in 2005 [11]. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Tom Courtenay (pronounced Courtney) (born February 25, 1937) is a British actor who came to prominence in the early 1960s with a succession of critically-acclaimed films including The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Billy Liar (1963) and Dr. Zhivago (1965). ... Since opening in March 1990, West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds has established a reputation both nationally and internationally as one of Britains most exciting producing theatres, winning awards for everything from its productions to its customer service. ... The Royal Comedy Theatre, as it was then known, opened in Londons West End on October 15, 1881. ...


In 2003, BBC Two broadcast a play, titled Love Again, that dealt with the last thirty years of Larkin's life. The lead role was played by Hugh Bonneville [12] and in the same year Channel 4 broadcast the documentary Philip Larkin, Love and Death in Hull [13]. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Hugh Bonneville (born on 10 November 1963 in London) is an acclaimed English film and television actor. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ...


After laying undiscovered in a Hornsea garage for over two decades, an precedented collection of Larkin audio tapes were found in 2006. The recordings were made by the poet in the early 1980s [14]. Extracts can be heard during a Sky News report [15]. Hornsea is a small seaside resort town and civil parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England at the eastern end of the Trans Pennine Trail. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Sky News is a 24-hour British domestic and international television news and sports-news channel that started broadcasting on 16 February 1989 as part of the then four-channel Sky Television service. ...


Bibliography

Poetry

Fiction This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Whitsun Weddings is a book of poems by Philip Larkin. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Mr Bleaney is a poem written by English poet Philip Larkin. ... High Windows is a collection of poems by English poet Philip Larkin, and was published in 1974 by Faber and Faber Limited. ... This Be The Verse is a short poem by the English poet Philip Larkin (1922–1985). ... Annus Mirabilis is a poem written by John Dryden and published in 1667. ...

  • Jill (1946), (ISBN 0-87951-961-4)
  • A Girl in Winter (1947), (ISBN 0-87951-217-2)
  • "Trouble at Willow Gables" and Other Fiction 1943–1953 (writing as "Brunette Coleman"), (ISBN 0-571-20347-7)

Non-fiction This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...

  • All What Jazz: A Record Diary 1961 – 1971
  • Required Writing: Miscellaneous Pieces 1955 – 1982 (1983)
  • Further Requirements: Interviews, Broadcasts, Statements and Book Reviews 1952 – 1985

Miscellaneous

  • The Oxford Book of Twentieth-Century English Verse (as editor) (1973)

Books about Larkin The Oxford Book of Twentieth Century English Verse was a poetry anthology edited by Philip Larkin, and published in 1973 by Oxford University Press with ISBN 0198121377. ...

  • Philip Larkin: A Writer's Life, Andrew Motion (1993). ISBN 0-571-17065-X
  • Selected Letters of Philip Larkin, Anthony Thwaite, editor (1992). ISBN 0-571-17048-X
  • The Philip Larkin I Knew, Maeve Brennan, Manchester University Press (2002). ISBN 0-7190-6275-6
  • Philip Larkin and English Poetry, Terry Whalen, University of British Columbia Press (1986), ISBN 0-7748-0232-4
  • Pretending to be Me: Phillip Larkin, a portrait, Tom Courtenay, (2005), ISBN 1-4055-0082-4
  • Philip Larkin: The Poet's Plight, James Booth, (2005), ISBN 1-4039-1834-1
  • First Boredom Then Fear: The Life of Philip Larkin, Richard Bradford (2006). ISBN 0-7206-1147-4

Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... Anthony Simon Thwaite (born 1930) is a British poet and writer. ... Tom Courtenay (pronounced Courtney) (born February 25, 1937) is a British actor who came to prominence in the early 1960s with a succession of critically-acclaimed films including The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Billy Liar (1963) and Dr. Zhivago (1965). ... James Booth (19 December 1927- 11 August 2005) was the stage name of David Geeves. ... Richard Bradford (1932—2002) is a novelist, best known for his 1968 novel Red Sky at Morning, a film version of which was released in 1971. ...

Notes

  1. ^ see for example, Andrew Swarbrick, Out of Reach: The Poetry of Philip Larkin, Palgrave Macmillan, 1995 (ISBN 0-312-12545-3)

External links

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Philip Larkin (1111 words)
Larkin avoided "big" words, sentimentality and philosophising, his language was plain, his approach was cool and restricted, which led critics to accuse him of lack of emotional involvement.
Larkin managed to maintain three long relationships - most of his life Larkin spent with Monica Jones, a professor of English, whom he met when he was 24.
Larkin's mother died in 1977, and after her death he wrote only 11 poems, although he produced a book of essays in 1983.
Philip Larkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (794 words)
Larkin was born to Sydney and Eva Larkin in Coventry, a provincial city in the Midlands.
Larkin was by contrast a notable critic of modernism in contemporary art and literature; his scepticism is at its most nuanced and illuminating in Required Writing, a collection of his book-reviews and essays; it is at its most enflamed and polemical in his introduction to his collected jazz reviews, All What Jazz.
Larkin died of oesophageal cancer, aged 63, and is buried at the Cottingham Municipal Cemetery in Hull.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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