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Encyclopedia > Philip K. Dick
Philip K. Dick

Philip K. Dick (photo by Nicole Panter ©2007)
Pseudonym: Richard Philips, Jack Dowland
Born: December 16, 1928(1928-12-16)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Died: March 2, 1982 (aged 53)
Santa Ana, California, U.S.
Occupation: Novelist, short story writer
Nationality: American
Genres: Science Fiction
Postmodernism
Influences: Flaubert, Balzac, Kant, Samuel Beckett, Dostoyevsky, John Sladek, Nathanael West, Jorge Luis Borges
Influenced: The Wachowski Brothers, Jean Baudrillard, David Cronenberg, Richard Linklater, Jonathan Lethem, Fredric Jameson, Slavoj Žižek, Roberto Bolaño, Rodrigo Fresán, Mark E. Smith
Website: PhilipKDick.com

Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. In addition to his dozens of published novels,[1] Dick wrote approximately 121 short stories, many of which appeared in science fiction magazines.[2] At least eight of his stories have been adapted for film. Uploaded from: http://www. ... A pseudonym (Greek: , pseudo + -onym: false name) is an artificial, fictitious name, also known as an alias, used by an individual as an alternative to a persons legal name. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... Gustave Flaubert Gustave Flaubert (December 12, 1821 – Croisset, May 8, 1880) is counted among the greatest Western novelists. ... Honoré de Balzac Honoré de Balzac (May 20, 1799 - August 18, 1850), was a French novelist. ... Immanuel Kant Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a Prussian philosopher, generally regarded as one of Europes most influential thinkers and the last major philosopher of the Enlightenment. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... John Thomas Sladek (December 15, 1937 - March 10, 2000) was an American science-fiction author. ... Nathanael West (October 17, 1903 – December 22, 1940) was the pen name of US author, screenwriter and satirist Nathan Wallenstein Weinstein. ... Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... Laurence Larry Wachowski (born June 21, 1965) and Andrew Andy Wachowski (born December 29, 1967) are American film directors and writers most famous for creating The Matrix series. ... Jean Baudrillard (July 29, 1929 – March 6, 2007) (IPA pronunciation: [1]) was a French cultural theorist, philosopher, political commentator, and photographer. ... David Paul Cronenberg OC, FRSC (born May 15, 1943[2]) is a Canadian film director and occasional actor. ... Richard Rick Linklater (born July 30, 1961, in Houston, Texas) is an Academy Award nominated American film director and writer. ... Lethem giving the keynote address at the EMP Pop Conference, 2007. ... Fredric Jameson (b. ... Slavoj Žižek (pronounced: ) (born 21 March 1949) is a Slovenian sociologist, postmodern philosopher, and cultural critic. ... Roberto Bolaño (April 28, 1953 — July 15, 2003) was a Chilean novelist and poet, winner of the prestigious Rómulo Gallegos Prize for his novel Los detectives salvajes (The Savage Detectives) in 1999. ... Rodrigo Fresán (born 1963 in Buenos Aires, Argentina) is a fiction writer and journalist. ... Mark E. Smith (born 5 March 1957) is the lead singer, lyricist, frontman, and sole consistent member of The Fall, a renowned and idiosyncratic offshoot from the UK post-punk/new wave music scenes. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the literary concept. ...

Contents

Overview

Foreshadowing the cyberpunk sub-genre, Philip K. Dick brought the anomic world of California to many of his works, exploring sociological and political themes in novels which were often dominated by monopolistic corporations and authoritarian governments. In his later works, Dick addressed the nature of drug use, paranoia and schizophrenia, religious experience and theology, drawing upon his own life experiences in novels such as A Scanner Darkly and VALIS. Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Anomie, in contemporary English, means a condition or malaise in individuals, characterized by an absence or diminution of standards or values. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article is about the economics of markets dominated by a single seller. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article applies to political and organizational ideologies. ... For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... A Scanner Darkly is a 1977 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


His novel The Man in the High Castle bridged the genres of alternative history and science fiction, earning a Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1963. Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said, a novel about a celebrity who awakens in a parallel universe where he is completely unknown, won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best novel in 1975. "I want to write about people I love, and put them into a fictional world spun out of my own mind, not the world we actually have, because the world we actually have does not meet my standards," Dick wrote of these stories. "In my writing I even question the universe; I wonder out loud if it is real, and I wonder out loud if all of us are real." Dick spent most of his career as a writer in near-poverty.[3] The Man in the High Castle is a 1962 alternate history novel by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Hugo Awards are given annually for the best science fiction or fantasy works. ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ...


Dick's stories have been adapted into popular films such as Blade Runner, Total Recall, A Scanner Darkly, Minority Report, Imposter and others. In 2007 Dick became the first science fiction writer to be included in The Library of America series (#173). This article is about the 1982 film. ... Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 2006 film by Richard Linklater based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name. ... Minority Report is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story of the same name. ... Impostor is based upon a short story written by Philip K. Dick in 1953. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ...


Common themes

Dick's stories typically focus on the fragile nature of what is "real" and the construction of personal identity. His stories often become surreal fantasies as the main characters slowly discover that their everyday world is actually an illusion constructed by powerful external entities (such as in Ubik [4]), vast political conspiracies, or simply from the vicissitudes of an unreliable narrator. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Cover of the 1970 Dell paperback edition of Ubik Ubik is a 1969 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Illustration by Gustave Doré for Baron Münchhausen: tall tales, such as those of the Baron, often feature unreliable narrators. ...


"All of his work starts with the basic assumption that there cannot be one, single, objective reality," writes science fiction author Charles Platt. "Everything is a matter of perception. The ground is liable to shift under your feet. A protagonist may find himself living out another person's dream, or he may enter a drug-induced state that actually makes better sense than the real world, or he may cross into a different universe completely."[5] Charles Platt (born in London, England, 1945) is the author of 41 fiction and nonfiction books, including science-fiction novels such as The Silicon Man (endorsed by William Gibson as A plausible, well-crafted narrative exploring cyberspace in a wholly new and very refreshing way) and Protektor (published in paperback...


"I used to dig in the garden, and there is nothing fantastic or ultradimensional about crab grass... unless you are an sf (science fiction) writer, in which case you are viewing crab grass with suspicion. What are its real motives? And who sent it in the first place?" Philip K Dick, We can remember it for you wholesale, Notes, 1987, Orion.


Alternate universes and simulacra were common plot devices, with fictional worlds inhabited by common, working people, rather than galactic elites. "There are no heroes in Dick's books," Ursula K. Le Guin wrote, "but there are heroics. One is reminded of Dickens: what counts is the honesty, constancy, kindness and patience of ordinary people."[4] Dick made no secret that much of his ideas and work were heavily influenced by the writings of C.G. Jung, the Swiss founder of the theory of the human psyche he called "Analytical Psychology" (to distinguish it from Freud's theory of psychoanalysis). Jung was a self-taught expert on the unconscious and mythological foundations of conscious experience and was open to the Reality underlying mystical experiences. The Jungian constructs and models that most concerned Dick seem to be the archetypes of the collective unconscious, group projection/ hallucination, synchronicities, and personality theory. Many of Dick's protagonists overtly analyze reality and their perceptions in Jungian terms (see Lies Inc.), while other times, the themes are so obviously in reference to Jung their usage needs no explanation. Dick's self-named "Exegesis" also contained many notes on Jung in relation to theology and mysticism. Parallel universe or alternate reality in science fiction and fantasy is a self-contained separate reality coexisting with our own. ... Simulacrum (plural: simulacra), from the Latin simulare, to make like, to put on an appearance of, originally meaning a material object representing something (such as a cult image representing a deity, or a painted still-life of a bowl of fruit). ... A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ...


Life

Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ...

Early life

Philip Kindred Dick and his twin sister, Jane Charlotte Dick, were born six weeks premature to Dorothy Kindred Dick and Joseph Edgar Dick in Chicago.[6] Dick's father, a fraud investigator for the United States Department of Agriculture, had recently taken out life insurance policies on the family. An insurance nurse was dispatched to the Dick household. Upon seeing the malnourished Philip and injured Jane, the nurse rushed the babies to hospital. Baby Jane died enroute, just five weeks after her birth (January 26, 1929). The death of Philip's twin sister profoundly affected his writing, relationships, and every aspect of his life, leading to the recurrent motif of the "phantom twin" in many of his books. For other uses, see Twin (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... “USDA” redirects here. ... In literature, a motif is a recurring element or theme that has symbolic significance in the story. ...


The family moved to the San Francisco Bay Area. When Philip turned five, his father was transferred to Reno, Nevada. Dorothy refused to move, and she and Joseph were divorced. Joseph fought her for custody of Philip but did not win it. Dorothy, determined to raise Philip alone, took a job in Washington, D.C. and moved there with her son. USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... “Reno” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Philip K. Dick was enrolled at John Eaton Elementary School from 1936 to 1938, completing the second through the fourth grades. His lowest grade was a "C" in written composition, although a teacher remarked that he "shows interest and ability in story telling." In June 1938, Dorothy and Philip returned to California.


Dick attended Berkeley High School, Berkeley, California. He and Ursula K. Le Guin were members of the same high school graduating class (1947), yet were unknown to each other at the time. After graduating from high school he briefly attended the University of California, Berkeley as a German major, but dropped out before completing any coursework. At Berkeley Phil befriended poet Robert Duncan. He claimed to have been host of a classical music program on KSMO Radio in 1947. From 1948 to 1952 he worked in a record store. In 1955, Dick and his wife, Kleo Apostolides, received a visit from the FBI. They believed this resulted from Kleo's socialist views and left-wing activities. The couple briefly befriended one of the FBI agents. Dick himself regarded Communism as a control system equivalent to fascism.[8] Berkeley High School is the only public high school in Berkeley, California. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in northern California, in the United States. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsÉ™lÉ™ ËŒkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Robert Duncan may refer to: Robert Duncan (1919-1988), U.S. poet Robert Duncan, U.S. physicist Robert Duncan, British TV comedy actor Robert Duncan McNeill, U.S. actor, director and producer Robert Duncan, Episcopal bishop of Pittsburgh This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other...


Early writing career

Dick sold his first story in 1952. From that point on he wrote full-time, selling his first novel in 1955. The 1950s were a difficult impoverished time for Dick. He once said, "We couldn't even pay the late fees on a library book."


He published almost exclusively within the science fiction genre, but dreamed of a career in the mainstream of American literature. During the 1950s he produced a series of nongenre, non-science fiction novels. In 1960 he wrote that he was willing to "take twenty to thirty years to succeed as a literary writer." The dream of mainstream success formally died in January 1963 when the Scott Meredith Literary Agency returned all of his unsold mainstream novels. Only one of these works, Confessions of a Crap Artist, was published during Dick’s lifetime.[7] It has been suggested that Crap artist be merged into this article or section. ...


Recognition and success

In 1963, Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle. Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace. Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles. The Man in the High Castle is a 1962 alternate history novel by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Ace Books is the oldest continuing publisher of science fiction & fantasy novels, founded in 1953 by magazine publisher A. A. Wyn. ...


In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection "The Golden Man," Dick wrote: "Several years ago, when I was ill, Heinlein offered his help, anything he could do, and we had never met; he would phone me to cheer me up and see how I was doing. He wanted to buy me an electric typewriter, God bless him—one of the few true gentlemen in this world. I don't agree with any ideas he puts forth in his writing, but that is neither here nor there. One time when I owed the IRS a lot of money and couldn't raise it, Heinlein loaned the money to me. I think a great deal of him and his wife; I dedicated a book to them in appreciation. Robert Heinlein is a fine-looking man, very impressive and very military in stance; you can tell he has a military background, even to the haircut. He knows I'm a flipped-out freak and still he helped me and my wife when we were in trouble. That is the best in humanity, there; that is who and what I love." Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Mechanical desktop typewriters, such as this Underwood Five, were long time standards of government agencies, newsrooms, and sales offices. ... Seal of the Internal Revenue Service Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Part of the Taxation series        “IRS” redirects here. ...


In 1972, Dick donated his manuscripts and papers to the Special Collections Library at California State University, Fullerton where they are archived in the Philip K. Dick Science Fiction Collection in the Pollak Library. It was in Fullerton that Philip K. Dick befriended science fiction writers K. W. Jeter, James Blaylock, and Tim Powers. California State University, Fullerton, commonly known as CSUF, CSU Fullerton, or Cal State Fullerton, is a part of the California State University system. ... Kevin Wayne Jeter (born 1950) is an American science fiction and horror author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and paranoid, unsympathetic characters. ... James P. Blaylock (born September 20, 1950) is an American fantasy author. ... Tim Powers at the Israeli ICon 2005 SF&F Convention Timothy Thomas Powers (born February 29, 1952) is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ...


The last novel published during Dick's life was The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer is a 1982 novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Visions and psychological problems

In his boyhood, around the age of thirteen, Dick had a recurring dream for several weeks. He dreamt he was in a bookstore, trying to find an issue of Astounding Magazine. This issue of the magazine would contain the story titled "The Empire Never Ended", which would reveal the secrets of the universe to him. As the dream recurred, the pile of magazines he searched grew smaller and smaller, but he never reached the bottom. Eventually, he became anxious that discovering the magazine would drive him mad (as in Lovecraft's Necronomicon or Chambers' The King in Yellow, promising insanity to the reader). Shortly thereafter, the dreams ceased, but the phrase "The Empire Never Ended" would appear later in his work. Dick was a voracious reader of religion, philosophy, metaphysics, and Gnosticism, ideas of which appear in many of his stories and visions. Special Edition Live Album cover Cover of the Special Edition Live Album included with selected versions of Recurring Dream. ... Astounding Stories was a seminal science fiction magazine founded in 1930. ... Howard Phillips Lovecraft (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction, noted for combining these three genres within single narratives. ... A prop designed to look like the Necronomicon. ... Robert William Chambers (May 26, 1865 – December 16, 1933) was an American artist and writer. ... The King in Yellow is a collection of short stories published by Robert W. Chambers in 1895. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


On February 20, 1974, Dick was recovering from the effects of sodium pentothal administered for the extraction of an impacted wisdom tooth. Answering the door to receive delivery of extra analgesic, he noticed that the delivery woman was wearing a pendant with a symbol that he called the "vesicle pisces". This name seems to have been based on his confusion of two related symbols, the ichthys (two intersecting arcs delineating a fish in profile) that early Christians used as a secret symbol, and the vesica piscis. Sodium thiopental, better known as Sodium Pentothal (a trademark of Abbott Laboratories), thiopental, thiopentone sodium, or trapanal, is a rapid-onset short-acting barbiturate general anaesthetic. ... Wisdom teeth are third molars that usually appear between the ages of 18 and 20 (although they may appear when older, or fail to appear at all). ... A pendant (from Old French) is a hanging object, generally attached to a necklace or an earring. ... The ichthys has been used to represent a number of ideas. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Vesica Piscis The vesica piscis is a symbol made from two circles of the same radius, intersecting in such a way that the center of each circle lies on the circumference of the other. ...


After the deliverywoman's departure, Dick began experiencing strange visions. Although they may have been initially attributable to the medication, after weeks of visions he considered this explanation implausible. "I experienced an invasion of my mind by a transcendentally rational mind, as if I had been insane all my life and suddenly I had become sane," Dick told Charles Platt.[5]


Throughout February and March of 1974, he received a series of visions, which he referred to as "two-three-seventy-four" (2-3-74), shorthand for February-March 1974. He described the initial visions as laser beams and geometric patterns, and, occasionally, brief pictures of Jesus and of ancient Rome. As the visions increased in length and frequency, Dick claimed he began to live a double life, one as himself, "Philip K. Dick", and one as "Thomas", a Christian persecuted by Romans in the 1st century A.D. Despite his history of drug use and elevated stroke risk, Dick began seeking other rationalist and religious explanations for these experiences. He referred to the "transcendentally rational mind" as "Zebra", "God" and, most often, "VALIS". Dick wrote about the experiences in the semi-autobiographical novels Valis and Radio Free Albemuth. For alternative meanings see laser (disambiguation). ... Calabi-Yau manifold Geometry (Greek γεωμετρία; geo = earth, metria = measure) is a part of mathematics concerned with questions of size, shape, and relative position of figures and with properties of space. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... jacket cover A posthumously published novel by Philip K. Dick, written in 1976, Radio Free Albemuth (originally titled VALISystem A) was his first attempt to deal in fiction with his experiences of early 1974. ...


In time, Dick became paranoid, imagining plots against him by the KGB and FBI. At one point, he alleged they were responsible for a burglary of his house, from which documents were stolen. He later came to suspect that he might have committed the burglary against himself, and then forgotten he had done so. This experience is mirrored in the Bob Arctor-Agent Fred character in A Scanner Darkly. For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... This article is about the KGB of the Soviet Union. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... A Scanner Darkly is a 1977 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Dick himself speculated as to whether he may have suffered from schizophrenia. Mental illness was a constant interest of Dick's, and themes of mental illness permeate his work. The character Jack Bohlen in the 1964 novel Martian Time-Slip is an "ex-schizophrenic". The novel Clans of the Alphane Moon centers on an entire society made up of descendants of lunatic asylum inmates. In 1965 he wrote the essay titled Schizophrenia and the Book of Changes.[8] Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Cover of the first edition of Martian Time Slip published by Ballantine Martian Time-Slip is a 1964 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Clans of the Alphane Moon is a 1964 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


Drug use was also a theme in many of Dick’s works, such as A Scanner Darkly and The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. Dick was a drug user for much of his life. According to a 1975 interview in Rolling Stone [1], Dick wrote all of his books published before 1970 high on amphetamines. "A Scanner Darkly [published in 1977] was the first complete novel I had written without speed," said Dick in the interview. He also experimented briefly with psychedelics, but wrote The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, which Rolling Stone dubs “the classic LSD novel of all time,” before he had ever tried them. Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 1977 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is a typically complex novel by the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Amphetamine or Amfetamine (Alpha-Methyl-PHenEThylAMINE), also known as beta-phenyl-isopropylamine and benzedrine, is a prescription stimulant commonly used to treat Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults and children. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For psychedelics, see psychedelic drug. ... The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is a typically complex novel by the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ...


Aliases

He occasionally wrote under pen names, most notably Richard Philips and Jack Dowland. The surname Dowland refers to composer John Dowland, who is featured in several works. The title Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said directly refers to Dowland's best-known composition, Flow My Tears. In the novel The Divine Invasion, the 'Linda Fox' character is an intergalactically famous singer whose entire body of work consists of remakes of John Dowland compositions. Also, some protagonists in Dick's short fiction are named 'Dowland'. A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... John Dowland (1563 – February 20, 1626) was an English composer, singer, and lutenist. ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... The Divine Invasion is a 1981 science fiction book by Philip K. Dick. ...


The short story "Orpheus with Clay Feet" was published under the pen name "Jack Dowland". The protagonist desires to be the muse for fictional author Jack Dowland, considered the greatest science fiction author of the 20th century. In the story, Dowland publishes a short story titled "Orpheus with Clay Feet", under the pen name "Philip K. Dick". In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ...


In the semi-autobiographical novel VALIS, the protagonist is named "Horselover Fat"; "Philip", or "Phil-Hippos", is Greek for "horselover", while "dick" is German for "fat". VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Obesity is a condition in which the natural energy reserve, stored in the fatty tissue of humans and other mammals, is increased to a point where it is associated with certain health conditions or increased mortality. ...


Although he never used it himself, Dick's fans and critics often refer to him familiarly as "PKD" (cf. Jorge Luis Borges' "JLB"), and use the comparative literary adjectives "Dickian" and "Phildickian" in describing his style and themes (cf. Kafkaesque, Orwellian). Jorge Luis Borges (August 24, 1899 – June 14, 1986) was an Argentine writer. ... Kafkaesque is an adjective which is used to describe concepts, situations, and ideas which are reminiscent of the literary work of Prague writer Franz Kafka, particularly his novel The Trial and his novella The Metamorphosis. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Marriages and children

Dick married five times, and had two daughters and a son; each marriage ended in divorce. Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ...

  • May 1948, to Jeanette Marlin (lasted six months)
  • June 1950, to Kleo Apostolides (divorced 1959)
  • 1959, to Anne Williams Rubinstein (child: Laura Archer, born February 25, 1960) (divorced 1964)
  • 1966, to Nancy Hackett (child: Isolde, "Isa") (divorced 1972)
  • April 18, 1973, to Leslie (Tessa) Busby (child: Christopher) (divorced 1977)

Death

Philip K. Dick Android in the Nextfest Exhibition at Navy Pier
Philip K. Dick Android in the Nextfest Exhibition at Navy Pier

Philip K. Dick died in Santa Ana, California, on March 2, 1982. He had suffered a stroke five days earlier, and was disconnected from life support after his EEG had been consistently isoelectric since losing consciousness. After his death, his father Edgar took his son's ashes to Fort Morgan, Colorado. When his twin sister, Jane, died, her tombstone had both their names carved to it, with an empty space for Dick's death date. Brother and sister were eventually buried next to each other. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... For other uses, see Stroke (disambiguation). ... Life support, in the medical field, refers to a set of therapies for preserving a patients life when essential body systems are not functioning sufficiently to sustain life unaided. ... Electroencephalography is the neurophysiologic exploration of the electrical activity of the brain by the application of electrodes to the scalp. ... “QRS” redirects here. ... Fort Morgan is a city located in Morgan County, Colorado. ...


Dick was "resurrected" by his fans in the form of a remote-controlled android designed in his likeness. The android of Philip K. Dick was impanelled in a San Diego Comic Con presentation about the film adaptation of the novel, A Scanner Darkly. In February 2006, an airline misplaced the android, and it has not yet been found. Comic-Con International is an annual comic book convention held in San Diego, California. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 1977 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Biographical film

On 8 August 2006, actor Paul Giamatti announced that his company, Touchy Feely Films, plans to produce a biopic about Dick, with the permission of Isa Dick Hackett, PKD's daughter, through her company Electric Shepherd Productions. Tony Grisoni, who wrote the screenplays for films such as Terry Gilliam's Tideland and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, is writing the film script.[9] Paul Edward Valentine Giamatti (born June 6, 1967) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Poster for Man on the Moon (1999), a biopic A biographical picture— often shortened to biopic— is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people. ... Terrence Vance Gilliam (born November 22, 1940) is an American-born British filmmaker, animator, and member of the Monty Python comedy troupe. ... Tideland (2005) is a film co-written and directed by Terry Gilliam, an adaptation of Mitch Cullins novel Tideland. ... The hard cover version of the book. ...


Selected works

For complete bibliography, see Bibliography of Philip K. Dick. // The Game-Players of Titan 1950 Gather Yourselves Together (1994) 1952 Voices From the Street (2007) 1953 Vulcans Hammer (1960+) Dr. Futurity (1960+) The Cosmic Puppets (1957*) 1954 Solar Lottery (1955*) Mary and the Giant (1987*) The World Jones Made (1956) 1955 Eye in the Sky (1957) The Man...


The Man in the High Castle

The Man in the High Castle (1962) occurs in an alternate universe United States ruled by the victorious Axis powers. It is considered a defining novel of the alternate history sub-genre, and is the only Dick novel to win a Hugo Award. Philipkdickfans.com recommends this novel, along with Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and Ubik, as an introductory novel to readers new to the writing of Philip K. Dick.[10] The Man in the High Castle is a 1962 alternate history novel by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Cover of the 1970 Dell paperback edition of Ubik Ubik is a 1969 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch (1965) utilizes an array of science fiction concepts and features several layers of reality and unreality. It is also one of Dick’s first works to explore religious themes. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is a typically complex novel by the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch occurs in the twenty-first century, when, under United Nations authority, mankind has colonized the solar system's every habitable planet and moon. Life is physically daunting and psychologically monotonous for most colonists, so the UN must draft people to go to the colonies. Most entertain themselves using Perky Pat dolls and accessories manufactured by Earth-based P.P. Layouts. The company also secretly creates Can-D, an illegal but widely available hallucinogenic drug allowing the user to "translate" into Perky Pat (if the drug user is a woman) or Pat's boyfriend, Walt (if the drug user is a man). This recreational use of Can-D allows colonists to experience a few minutes of an idealized life on Earth by participating in a collective hallucination. (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2001-2100. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... Habitability is the conformance of a residence or abode to the implied warranty of habitability. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... For other uses, see Doll (disambiguation). ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is the story of a bounty hunter policing the local android population. It occurs on a dying, poisoned Earth de-populated of all "successful" humans; the only remaining inhabitants of the planet are people with no prospects off-world. Androids, also known as andys, all have a preset "death" date. However, a few andys seek to escape this fate and supplant the humans on Earth. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968) is well known as the literary source of the influential 1982 film Blade Runner. It is both a conflation and an intensification of the pivotally Dickian question, What is real, what is fake? Are the human-looking and human-acting androids fake or real humans? Should we treat them as machines or as people? What crucial factor defines humanity as distinctly 'alive', versus those merely alive only in their outward appearance? This article is about the 1982 film. ...


Ubik

Main article: Ubik

Ubik (1969) uses extensive networks of psychics and a suspended state after death in creating a state of eroding reality. A group of psychics is sent to investigate a group of rival psychics, but several of them are apparently killed by a saboteurs bomb. Much of the novel flicks between a number of equally plausible realities; the 'real' reality, a state of half-life and psychically manipulated realities. In 2005, Time Magazine listed it among the All-TIME 100 Greatest Novels.[11] Cover of the 1970 Dell paperback edition of Ubik Ubik is a 1969 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... The All-TIME 100 Greatest Novels was a list published by TIME magazine in 2005 of the greatest ever English-language pieces of literature published since TIME was founded in 1923. ...


Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said

Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said (1974) concerns Jason Taverner, a television star living in a dystopic near-future police state. After being attacked by an angry ex-girlfriend, Taverner awakens in a dingy hotel room. He still has his money in his wallet, but his identification cards are missing. This is no minor inconvenience, as security checkpoints (manned by 'pols' and 'Nats', the police and National Guard) are set up throughout the city to stop and arrest anyone without valid ID. Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... A police state is a political condition where the government maintains strict control over society, particularly through suspension of civil rights and often with the use of a force of secret police. ...


Jason at first thinks that he was robbed, but soon discovers that his entire identity has been erased. There is no record of him in any official database, and even his closest associates do not recognize or remember him. For the first time in many years, Jason has no fame or reputation to rely on. He has only his innate charisma to help him as he tries to find out what happened to his past and avoid the attention of the pols.


Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said was Dick's first published novel after years of silence, during which time his critical reputation had grown, and this novel was awarded the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel. It is the only Philip K. Dick novel nominated both for a Hugo and for a Nebula Award. The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ...


In an essay written two years before dying, Dick described how he learned from his Episcopalian priest that an important scene in the novel was very similar to a scene in the Book of Acts.[12] Richard Linklater talks about this novel in his film Waking Life, which begins with a scene reminiscent of another Dick novel, Time out of Joint. The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Richard Rick Linklater (born July 30, 1961, in Houston, Texas) is an Academy Award nominated American film director and writer. ... Waking Life is a digitally rotoscoped and animated film, directed by Richard Linklater and made in 2001. ... Cover of 1977 Belmont paperback edition. ...


A Scanner Darkly

Main article: A Scanner Darkly

A Scanner Darkly (1977) is a bleak mixture of science fiction and police procedural novels; in its story, an undercover narcotics police detective begins to lose touch with reality after falling victim to the same permanently mind altering drug, Substance D, he was enlisted to help fight. Substance D is instantly addictive, beginning with a pleasant euphoria which is quickly replaced with increasing confusion, hallucinations and eventually total psychosis. In this novel, as with all Dick novels, there is an underlying thread of paranoia and dissociation with multiple realities perceived simultaneously. It was adapted to film by Richard Linklater. A Scanner Darkly is a 1977 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... The police procedural is a sub-genre of the mystery story which attempts to accurately depict the activities of a police force as they investigate crimes. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 2006 film by Richard Linklater based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name. ... Richard Rick Linklater (born July 30, 1961, in Houston, Texas) is an Academy Award nominated American film director and writer. ...


VALIS

Main article: VALIS

VALIS, (1980) is perhaps Dick’s most postmodern and autobiographical novel, examining his own unexplained experiences (see above). It may also be considered his most academically studied work, and was adapted as an opera by Tod Machover.[13] VALIS was voted Philip K. Dick‘s best novel at the website philipkdickfans.com.[14] VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used by philosophers, social scientists, art critics and social critics to refer to aspects of contemporary art, culture, economics and social conditions that are the result of the unique features of late 20th century and early 21st century... This Side Of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a famous example of an autobiographical novel An autobiographical novel is a novel based on the life of the author. ... This article is about Opera, the art form. ... Tod Machover (1953 –) is the son of a pianist and a computer scientist. ...


His later works, especially the VALIS trilogy, were heavily autobiographical, many with "two-three-seventy-four" (2-3-74) references and influences. The word VALIS is the acronym for Vast Active Living Intelligence System; it is the title of a novel (and is continued thematically in at least three more novels). Later, PKD theorized that VALIS was both a "reality generator" and a means of extraterrestrial communication. A fourth VALIS manuscript, Radio Free Albemuth, although composed in 1976, was discovered after his death and published in 1985. This work is described by the publisher (Arbor House)as "an introduction and key to his magnificent VALIS trilogy." In February and March of 1974, science fiction author Philip K. Dick experienced visions in which he claimed to have been contacted by a transcendental, mystical mind he called VALIS, or Vast Active Living Intelligence System. ... For music albums named Autobiography, see Greek eauton = self, bios = life and graphein = write) is a form of biography, the writing of a life story. ... VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Exegesis

Main article: Exegesis (book)

Regardless of the feeling that he was somehow experiencing a divine communication, Dick was unable, ever, to fully rationalize the events. For the rest of his life, he struggled to fully comprehend what was occurring, questioning his own sanity and perception of reality. He transcribed what thoughts he could into an eight-thousand-page, one million word journal dubbed the Exegesis. Exegesis is a journal kept by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, documenting his alleged communication with a God-entity. ... This article is about the journal as a written medium. ... Exegesis is a journal kept by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, documenting his alleged communication with a God-entity. ...


From 1974 until his death in 1982, Dick spent sleepless nights writing in this journal, often under the influence of prescription amphetamines. A recurring theme in Exegesis is PKD's hypothesis that history had been stopped in the 1st century B.C., and that "the Empire never ended". He saw Rome as the pinnacle of materialism and despotism, which, after forcing the Gnostics underground, had kept the population of Earth enslaved to worldly possessions. Dick believed that VALIS had communicated with him, and anonymous others, to induce the impeachment of U.S. President Richard M. Nixon, whom Dick believed to be the current Emperor of Rome incarnate. History studies time in human terms. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... In philosophy, materialism is that form of physicalism which holds that the only thing that can truly be said to exist is matter; that fundamentally, all things are composed of material and all phenomena are the result of material interactions; that matter is the only substance. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Influence and legacy

Awards

During his lifetime, Dick was awarded with:

Also of note is the convention Norwescon which each year presents the Philip K. Dick Award. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Man in the High Castle is a 1962 alternate history novel by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... Faith Of Our Fathers is a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick, first published in the anthology Dangerous Visions. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Dr. Bloodmoney, a book by Phillip K. Dick, is a story set in a post-apocalyptic future that has been shaken to its core by nuclear attacks that killed millions and left even more sports, or mutated humans and animals, dwelling in all radioactive areas. ... The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch is a typically complex novel by the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... The Transmigration of Timothy Archer is a 1982 novel by Philip K. Dick. ... The John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Best Science Fiction Novel has been awarded every year since 1973, except in 1994. ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ...


Adaptations

Films

A number of Dick's stories have been made into movies. Dick himself wrote a screenplay for an intended film adaptation of Ubik in 1974, but the film was never made. Many film adaptations have not used Dick's original titles. When asked why this was, Dick's ex-wife Tessa said, "Actually, the books rarely carry Phil's original titles, as the editors usually wrote new titles after reading his manuscripts. Phil often commented that he couldn't write good titles. If he could, he would have been an advertising writer instead of a novelist."[15]Films based on Dick's writing have accumulated a total revenue of around US $700 million as of 2004.[16] This article is about motion pictures. ... Cover of the 1970 Dell paperback edition of Ubik Ubik is a 1969 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...

  • The most famous film adaptation is Ridley Scott's classic movie Blade Runner (based on Dick's 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?). Dick was apprehensive about how his story would be adapted for the film; he refused to do a novelization of the film and he was critical of it and its director, Ridley Scott, during its production. When given an opportunity to see some of the special effects sequences of Los Angeles 2019, Dick was amazed that the environment was "exactly as how I'd imagined it!"[17] Following the screening, Dick and Scott had a frank but cordial discussion of Blade Runner's themes and characters, and although they had differing views, Dick fully backed the film from then on. Dick died from a stroke less than four months before the release of the film.
  • Total Recall (1990), based on the short story We Can Remember It for You Wholesale, evokes a feeling similar to that of the original story while streamlining the plot. However, the action-film protagonist is totally unlike Dick's typical nebbishy protagonist, a fearful and insecure anti-hero. It includes such elements as the confusion of fantasy and reality, the progression towards more fantastic elements through the story, machines talking back to humans, and the protagonist's doubts about his own identity.
  • Total Recall 2070 (1999), a single season Canadian TV show (22 episodes), based on thematic elements from We Can Remember It for You Wholesale and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and interwoven with snippets of other Dick stories, is much closer in feel to both Dick's works than the better-known films based on them. Protagonist is aptly named David Hume.
  • Steven Spielberg's adaptation of "The Minority Report" faithfully translates many of Dick's themes, but changes major plot points and adds an action-adventure framework.
  • Dick's 1953 story Imposter has been adapted twice: first in 1962 for the British anthology television series Out of This World and then, in 2002, the movie Impostor utilizes two of Dick's most common themes: mental illness, which diminishes the sufferer's ability to discriminate between reality and hallucination, and a protagonist persecuted by an oppressive government.
  • The film Screamers (1995) was based on a Dick short story Second Variety; the location was altered from a war-devastated Earth to a generic science fiction environment of a distant planet in the film.
  • John Woo's 2003 film, Paycheck, was a very loose adaptation of Dick's short story of that name, and suffered greatly both at the hands of critics and at the box office.
  • The French film Barjo ("Confessions d'un Barjo") is based on Dick's non-science-fiction book Confessions of a Crap Artist. Reflecting Dick's popularity and critical respect with the French, Barjo faithfully conveys a strong sense of Dick's aesthetic sensibility, unseen in the better-known film adaptations. A brief science fiction homage is slipped into the film in the form of a TV show.
  • An animated film of A Scanner Darkly was directed by Richard Linklater. It stars Keanu Reeves as Fred/Bob Arctor and Winona Ryder as Donna. Robert Downey Jr. and Woody Harrelson, actors both noted for drug issues, were also cast in the film. The film was produced using the process of rotoscoping: it was first shot in live-action and then the live footage was animated over.
  • Next, a loose adaptation of the short story "The Golden Man", was released in American theaters on April 27, 2007. It stars Nicolas Cage, Julianne Moore and Jessica Biel.

Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... We Can Remember It for You Wholesale is a novelette by Philip K. Dick first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in April 1966. ... Total Recall 2070 was a science fiction TV series first broadcast in 1999 in Canada and later the same year on Showtime. ... We Can Remember It for You Wholesale is a novelette by Philip K. Dick first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in April 1966. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... This article is about the philosopher. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Minority Report is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story of the same name. ... Minority Report can refer to: Minority Report, a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick Minority Report, a movie very loosely adapted from the initial storyline of Dicks short story Minority Report, a video game based on the movie Minority Report, an unrelated science fiction short story by... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Out of This World was a British science fiction anthology television series made by ABC Television and broadcast in 1962. ... Impostor is based upon a short story written by Philip K. Dick in 1953. ... Screamers is a 1995 film directed by Christian Duguay based on the short story Second Variety by Philip K. Dick. ... Second Variety is a short story by Philip K. Dick first published in Space Station Fiction in 1953. ... For other uses, see John Woo (disambiguation). ... Paycheck is a 2003 film adaptation of the short story Paycheck by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... It has been suggested that Crap artist be merged into this article or section. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 2006 film by Richard Linklater starring Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder, Woody Harrelson, Robert Downey Jr. ... Richard Rick Linklater (born July 30, 1961, in Houston, Texas) is an Academy Award nominated American film director and writer. ... Rotoscoping is an animation technique in which animators trace over live-action film movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... Next is a 2007 film loosely based on the science fiction short story The Golden Man by Philip K. Dick. ... The Golden Man is a 1954 science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick. ... Nicolas Cage (born January 7, 1964) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Julianne Moore (born December 3, 1960) is an Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... Jessica Claire Biel (born March 3, 1982) is an American actress and former fashion model best known for appearing in several Hollywood films such as Summer Catch, the remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and The Illusionist, as well as for her early television role of Mary Camden in the...

Stage and radio

  • At least two of Dick's works have been adapted for the stage. The first was the opera VALIS, composed and with libretto by Tod Machover, which premiered at the Pompidou Center in Paris on December 1, 1987, with a French libretto. It was subsequently revised and readapted into English, and was recorded and released on CD (Bridge Records BCD9007) in 1988.
  • The second known stage adaptation was Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said, produced by the New York-based avant-garde company Mabou Mines. It premiered in Boston at the Boston Shakespeare Theatre (June 18-30, 1985) and was subsequently staged in New York and Chicago.
  • A radio drama adaptation of Dick's short story "Mr. Spaceship" was aired by the Finnish Broadcasting Company (Yleisradio) in 1996 under the name "Menolippu Paratiisiin".
  • Radio dramatizations of Dick's short stories "Colony" and "The Defenders" were aired by NBC in 1956 as part of the series "X Minus One".

This article is about Opera, the art form. ... VALIS is a 1981 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Tod Machover (1953 –) is the son of a pianist and a computer scientist. ... The Pompidou Centres famous external skeleton of service pipes. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said is a Philip K. Dick novel in which Jason Taverner, who is a Six (a genetically improved superhuman) as well as a singer and television star, lives in a future American police state. ... Mabou Mines is an avant-garde theatre company founded in 1970 and based in New York City. ... Some listeners to Robert Heinleins Universe had previously read the story in Dells 1951 paperback edition. ...

Dick as a fictional character

Since his death, Dick has appeared as a character in a number of novels and stories, most notably Michael Bishop's The Secret Ascension (1987; published in the UK under the author's preferred title Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas), which is set in a Gnostic alternative universe where his non-genre work is published but his science fiction is banned by a totalitarian USA in thrall to a demonically possessed Richard Nixon. Brittle Innings by Michael Bishop (First Edition) / Bantam Books, 1994 (Cover art by Michael Dudash) Michael Lawson Bishop (born November 12, 1945 in Lincoln, Nebraska) is an award-winning American writer. ... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Other fictional post-mortem appearances by Dick include:

  • the short story The Transmigration of Philip K (1984) by Michael Swanwick (to be found in the 1991 collection Gravity's Angels),
  • the short play Kindred Blood in Kensington Gore (1992) by Brian W. Aldiss,
  • the Faction Paradox novel Of the City of the Saved... (2004) by Philip Purser-Hallard.

Dick is also the protagonist of Emmanuel Carrère's avantpop novel I Am Alive and You Are Dead, erroneously read as a biography of the US writer, actually full of fictional episodes and details. A 2005 play entitled 800 Words: the Transmigration of Philip K. Dick by Victoria Stewart re-imagines Dick's final days.[18] At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Michael Swanwick (born November 18, 1950) is an American science fiction author. ... Gravitys Angels is a collection of Science fiction stories by author Michael Swanwick. ... Brian Wilson Aldiss (born August 18, 1925 in East Dereham, Norfolk) is a prolific English author of both general fiction and science fiction. ... Faction Paradox is a fictional time travelling voodoo cult/rebel group/organized crime syndicate created by Lawrence Miles. ... Dr Philip Purser-Hallard (born Hallard in 1971) is an author and scholar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Role-playing game

In the Spanish role-playing game Fanhunter, the main enemy of the game, Pope Alejo, believes himself to be a reincarnation of Philip K. Dick, whom he met in the past, and controls most of Europe with a Church based on the "teachings" of Dick's books. This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Fanhunter is a bizarre universe created by the Spanish comic author Cels Piñol. ...


Contemporary philosophy

Few other writers of fiction have had such an impact on contemporary philosophy as Dick. His foreshadowing of post modernity has been noted by philosophers as diverse as Jean Baudrillard, Fredric Jameson and Slavoj Žižek. Žižek is especially fond of using Dick's short stories to articulate the ideas of Jacques Lacan. [19] For Baudrillard, Dick is the ultimate articulation of hyperreality: Jean Baudrillard (July 29, 1929 – March 6, 2007) (IPA pronunciation: [1]) was a French cultural theorist, philosopher, political commentator, and photographer. ... Fredric Jameson (b. ... Slavoj Žižek (pronounced: ) (born 21 March 1949) is a Slovenian sociologist, postmodern philosopher, and cultural critic. ... Jacques-Marie-Émile Lacan (French IPA: ) (April 13, 1901 – September 9, 1981) was a French psychoanalyst, psychiatrist, and doctor. ... In semiotics and postmodern philosophy, the term hyperreality characterizes the inability of consciousness to distinguish reality from fantasy, especially in technologically advanced postmodern cultures. ...

"It is hyperreal. It is a universe of simulation, which is something altogether different. And this is so not because Dick speaks specifically of simulacra. SF has always done so, but it has always played upon the double, on artificial replication or imaginary duplication, whereas here the double has disappeared. There is no more double; one is always already in the other world, an other world which is not another, without mirrors or projection or utopias as means for reflection. The simulation is impassable, unsurpassable, checkmated, without exteriority. We can no longer move "through the mirror" to the other side, as we could during the golden age of transcendence."[20]

Bibliography

Further information: Bibliography of Philip K. Dick

// The Game-Players of Titan 1950 Gather Yourselves Together (1994) 1952 Voices From the Street (2007) 1953 Vulcans Hammer (1960+) Dr. Futurity (1960+) The Cosmic Puppets (1957*) 1954 Solar Lottery (1955*) Mary and the Giant (1987*) The World Jones Made (1956) 1955 Eye in the Sky (1957) The Man...

See also

The Philip K. Dick Memorial Award is a science fiction award sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society, and named after science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Novels and Collection solidaisrity. www.philipkdick.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  2. ^ Short Stories. www.philipkdick.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  3. ^ Philip K. Dick. www.kirjasto.sci.fi. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  4. ^ a b Criticism and Analysis. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  5. ^ a b Platt, Charles. (1980). Dream Makers: The Uncommon People Who Write Science Fiction. Berkley Publishing. ISBN 0-425-04668-0
  6. ^ Official Biography. www.philipkdick.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-20.
  7. ^ The non-science fiction novels of Philip K. Dick
  8. ^ Sutin, Lawrence. Divine Invasions: A Life of Philip K. Dick. Carroll & Graf, 2005
  9. ^ philipkdick.com
  10. ^ philipkdickfans.com
  11. ^ time.com – Ubik
  12. ^ The religion of Philip K. Dick, accessed August 5 2006
  13. ^ web.media.mit.edu
  14. ^ philipkdickfans.com – Horse race results
  15. ^ Knight, Annie. About Philip K. Dick: An interview with Tessa, Chris, and Ranea Dick.
  16. ^ The Economist. April 17, 2004. v371. i8371 p. 83.
  17. ^ On the Edge of Bladerunner. Mark Kermode, Channel 4, July 15, 2000.
  18. ^ Victoria Stewart. The Playwrights' Center. Retrieved on 2007-07-30.
  19. ^ Žižek, Slavoj. "'The Desert and the Real'", Lacan.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-26. 
  20. ^ Baudrillard, Jean. "'Simulacra and Science Fiction'", Science Fiction Studies. Retrieved on 2007-05-26. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Platt (born in London, England, 1945) is the author of 41 fiction and nonfiction books, including science-fiction novels such as The Silicon Man (endorsed by William Gibson as A plausible, well-crafted narrative exploring cyberspace in a wholly new and very refreshing way) and Protektor (published in paperback... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Persondata
NAME Dick, Philip Kindred
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION American science fiction author
DATE OF BIRTH December 16, 1928
PLACE OF BIRTH Chicago, Illinois
DATE OF DEATH March 2, 1982
PLACE OF DEATH Santa Ana, California

This article is about the 1982 film. ... Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... It has been suggested that Crap artist be merged into this article or section. ... Screamers is a 1995 film directed by Christian Duguay based on the short story Second Variety by Philip K. Dick. ... Impostor is based upon a short story written by Philip K. Dick in 1953. ... Minority Report is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story of the same name. ... Paycheck is a 2003 film adaptation of the short story Paycheck by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 2006 film by Richard Linklater based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name. ... Next is a 2007 film loosely based on the science fiction short story The Golden Man by Philip K. Dick. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Santa Ana is the Spanish-language name of Saint Anne, the mother of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...


 
 

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