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Encyclopedia > Philip III of France
Philip III the Bold
King of France
Reign 25 August 12705 October 1285
Coronation 12 August 1271
Born 30 April 1245
Poissy
Died 5 October 1285
Perpignan
Buried Initially Narbonne, later Saint Denis Basilica
Predecessor Louis IX
Successor Philip IV
Consort Isabella of Aragon (1247-1271)
Maria of Brabant (1254-1321)
Issue Philip IV (1268-1314)
Charles, Count of Valois (1270-1325)
Louis, Count of Évreux (1276-1319)
Blanche, Duchess of Austria (1278-1305)
Margaret, Queen of England (1282-1317)
Royal House House of Capet
Father Louis IX of France (1215-1270)
Mother Marguerite of Provence (1221-1295)

Philip III the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (30 April 12455 October 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. A member of the Capetian dynasty, he was born in Poissy, the son of Louis IX of France and of Marguerite of Provence. Image File history File links Philippe3-1. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... Events Rebellion against king Sancho II of Portugal in favor of his brother Alphonso. ... Poissy is a commune of the Yvelines département in France, located 20km from Paris, with a population (1999) of 36,000. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Perpignan (French: Perpignan; Catalan Perpinyà) is a commune and the préfecture (administrative capital city) of the Pyrénées-Orientales département in southern France. ... Narbonne (Narbona in Catalan and in Occitan, commonly Narbo especially when referring to the Ancient Rome era) is a town and commune of southwestern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon région. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Isabella of Aragon (1247 – January 28, 1271), infanta of Aragon, was, by marriage, Queen consort of France in the Middle Ages from 1270 to 1271. ... Events Shams ad-Din disappears resulting in Jalal Uddin Rumi writing 30,000 verses of poetry about his disappearance. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Maria of Brabant (1256, Leuven – January 12, 1321, Murel), Queen consort of France. ... For broader historical context, see 1250s and 13th century. ... Events Births September 29 - John of Artois, Count of Eu, French soldier (d. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Conradin (right) is executed by Charles I of Sicily, thus extinguishing the Hohenstaufen dynasty, in 1268. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Charles III of Valois (1270 - 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella, daughter of James I. He was the father of Phillip VI, and uncle to three kings ( Louis X, Phillip V, and Charles IV). ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events January 7:Alfonso IV becomes the King of Portugal. ... Louis of France, Count dÉvreux (May, 1276 – May 19, 1319, Paris) was the third son of King Philip III the Bold with his second wife Marie de Brabant, and step-brother of King Philip IV the Fair. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events Magnus VII ascends the throne of Norway and unites the country with Sweden. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Events August 5 - English troops capture William Wallace Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia Archbishop of Bordeaux, Bertrand de Got, was elected as Pope Clement V. Philip IV of France accused the Knights Templar of heresy. ... Marguerite of France (1282 – 14 February 1317) was a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... The House of Capet includes any of the direct descendants of Robert the Strong. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... // Events A certified copy of the Magna Carta June 15 - King John of England forced to put his seal to the Magna Carta, outlining the rights of landowning men (nobles and knights) and restricting the kings power. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Marguerite Berenger of Provence (St. ... // Events May 13 - End of the reign of Emperor Juntoku, emperor of Japan Emperor ChÅ«kyō briefly reigns over Japan Former Emperor Go-Toba leads an unsuccessful rebellion against the Kamakura Shogunate Emperor Go-Horikawa ascends to the throne of Japan January - Mongol Army under Jochi captures the city of... Events Mongol leader Ghazan Khan is converted to Islam, ending a line of Tantric Buddhist leaders. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... Events Rebellion against king Sancho II of Portugal in favor of his brother Alphonso. ... October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (279th in Leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Poissy is a commune of the Yvelines département in France, located 20km from Paris, with a population (1999) of 36,000. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Marguerite Berenger of Provence (St. ...


He accompanied his father on the Eighth Crusade to Tunisia in 1270. His father died at Tunis and there Philip was declared king at the age of 25. Philip was indecisive, soft in nature, timid, and apparently crushed by the strong personalities of his parents and dominated by his father's policies. He was called "the Bold" on the basis of his abilities in combat and on horseback and not his character. He was pious, but not cultivated. He followed the dictates of others, first of Pierre de la Broce and then of his uncle Charles I of Sicily. The Eighth Crusade was a crusade launched by Louis IX of France, (who was by now in his mid-fifties) in 1270. ... Piety is a desire and willingness to perform religious duties. ... Pierre de la Broce (Sometimes spelled as Pierre de Brosse) (d. ... Charles I (March 1227 (or 1226) - January 7, 1285) was the posthumous (or born ten months before fathers death: sources suggest two possible birth years) son of King Louis VIII of France by Blanche of Castile. ...


After his succession, he quickly set his uncle on negotiations with the emir to conclude the crusade, while he himself returned to France. A ten-year truce was concluded and Philip was crowned in France on 12 August 1271. On 21 August, his uncle, Alfonso, Count of Poitou, Toulouse, and Auvergne, died returning from the crusade in Italy. Philip inherited his counties and united them to the royal demesne. The portion of the Auvergne which he inherited became the "Terre royale d'Auvergne," later the Duchy of Auvergne. In accordance with Alfonso's wishes, the Comtat Venaissin was granted to the Pope Gregory X in 1274. Several years of negotiations yielded the Treaty of Amiens with Edward I of England in 1279. Thereby Philip restored to the English the Agenais which had fallen to him with the death of Alfonso. In 1284, Philip also inherited the counties of Perche and Alençon from his brother Pierre. August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Alphonse, Count of Toulouse and of Poitiers (November 11, 1220 – August 21, 1271). ... Among the men who have borne the title of Count of Poitiers (or Poitou, in what is now France but in the Middle Ages became part of the Aquitaine) are: Guerin (or Warin[us]) (638-677) Renaud (795-843) Bernard I (815-844) Ranulph I (835-875) Ranulph II (855... After the Visigothic Kings of Aquitaine (409 - 508), the Merovingian kings were kings and dukes in Aquitaine and dukes of Toulouse. ... This is a list of the various rulers of Auvergne. ... The feudal concept of demesne is a form of manorial land tenure as conceived in Western Europe, initially in France but exported to England, during the Middle Ages. ... This is a list of the various rulers of Auvergne. ... The Comtat Venaissin, often called the Comtat for short, was the name formerly given to the region around the city of Avignon in Provence, in what is now southern France. ... Gregory X, né Theobald Visconti (Piacenza, ca. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1] and Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who kept Scotland under English domination during his lifetime. ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... Agenais, or Agenois, a former province of France. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... A Percheron draft horse Perche is a region of northern France extending over the départements of Orne, Eure, Eure-et-Loir and Sarthe. ... Alençon is a town in Normandy, France, préfecture (capital) of the Orne département. ...


Philip all the while supported his uncle's policy in Italy. When, after the Sicilian Vespers of 1282, Peter III of Aragon invaded and took the island of Sicily, the pope, Martin IV, excommunicated the conqueror and declared his kingdom (put under the suzerainty of the pope by Peter II in 1205) forfeit. He granted Aragon to Charles, Count of Valois, Philip's son. Philip intervened in the Navarrese succession after the death of Henry I of Navarre and married his son, Philip the Fair, to the heiress of Navarre, Joan I. Sicilian Vespers (1846), by Francesco Hayez The Sicilian Vespers is the name given to a rebellion in Sicily in 1282 against the rule of the Angevin king Charles I, who had taken control of the island with Papal support in 1266. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Peter III of Aragon (Catalan: Pere) (1239 – November 11, 1285, also Peter I of Valencia, Peter II of Barcelona), known as the Great, was the king of Aragon and Valencia and count of Barcelona from 1276 to 1285. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Martin IV, né Simon de Brion ( 1210 - March 28, 1285), held the papacy from February 21, 1281 until 1285. ... Peter II of Aragon (1174 – September 12, 1213), surnamed the Catholic, was the king of Aragon (as Pedro II) and count of Barcelona (as Pere I) from 1196 to 1213. ... Events January 6 - Philip of Swabia becomes King of the Romans April 14 - Battle of Adrianople (1205) between Bulgars and Latins August 20 - Following certain news of Baldwin Is death, Henry of Flanders is crowned Emperor of the Latin Empire Births Walter IV of Brienne Wenceslaus I, King of... Charles III of Valois (1270 - 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella, daughter of James I. He was the father of Phillip VI, and uncle to three kings ( Louis X, Phillip V, and Charles IV). ... Henry I the Fat (French: Henri le Gros, Spanish: Enrique el Gordo) (c. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Jeanne (or Joan or Johanna) of Navarre (c. ...

Coronation of Philip III (Grandes Chroniques de France).
Coronation of Philip III (Grandes Chroniques de France).

In 1284, Philip and his sons entered Roussillon at the head of a large army. This war, called the Aragonese Crusade from its papal sanction, has been labelled "perhaps the most unjust, unnecessary and calamitous enterprise ever undertaken by the Capetian monarchy."[1] On 26 June 1285, Philip the Bold entrenched himself before Gerona in an attempt to besiege it. The resistance was strong, but the city was taken on 7 September. Philip soon experienced a reversal, however, as the French camp was hit hard by an epidemic of dysentery. Philip himself was afflicted. The French retreated and were handily defeated at the Battle of the Col de Panissars. The king of France himself died at Perpignan, the capital of his ally James II of Majorca, and was buried in Narbonne. He currently lies buried with his wife Isabella of Aragon in Saint Denis Basilica in Paris. Image File history File links Miniature_Philippe_III_Courronement. ... Image File history File links Miniature_Philippe_III_Courronement. ... Philip Augustus captures Tours in 1189. ... The Aragonese Crusade or Crusade of Aragón was declared by Pope Martin IV against the king of Aragón, Peter III the Great, in 1284 and 1285. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... Girona (Catalan: Girona, Spanish: Gerona, French: Gérone) is a city located in the northwest of Catalonia, Spain on the confluence of the rivers Ter and Onyar. ... September 7 is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years). ... Dysentery is an illness (formerly known as the bloody flux or simply flux) involving severe diarrhea that is often associated with blood in the feces. ... Combatants Crown of Aragon France Commanders Peter III of Aragón, Ramon of Montcada, and Roger of Lauria Unknown The Battle of the Col de Panissars was fought on 30 September and 1 October 1285 between the forces of Philip III of France and Peter III of Aragón. ... Perpignan (French: Perpignan; Catalan Perpinyà) is a commune and the préfecture (administrative capital city) of the Pyrénées-Orientales département in southern France. ... Coat of Arms of the Kings of Majorca used only abroad James II (Catalan: Jaume II) was king of Majorca and Lord of Montpellier from 1243 until 1311. ... Narbonne (Narbona in Catalan and in Occitan, commonly Narbo especially when referring to the Ancient Rome era) is a town and commune of southwestern France in the Languedoc-Roussillon région. ... Isabella of Aragon (1247 – January 28, 1271), infanta of Aragon, was, by marriage, Queen consort of France in the Middle Ages from 1270 to 1271. ... West façade of Saint Denis Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...

French Monarchy
Direct Capetians

'France Ancient'
Philip III
   Philip IV
   Charles III, Count of Valois
   Louis d'Evreux
   Margaret, Queen of England

In the Divine Comedy, Dante sees Philip's spirit outside the gates of Purgatory with a number of other contemporary European rulers. Dante does not name Philip directly, but refers to him as "the small-nosed" and "the father of the Pest of France." The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ... Self-designed File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Charles III of Valois (March 12, 1270 – December 16, 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella of Aragon. ... Louis of France, Count dÉvreux (May, 1276 – May 19, 1319, Paris) was the third son of King Philip III the Bold with his second wife Marie de Brabant, and step-brother of King Philip IV the Fair. ... Marguerite of France (1282 – 14 February 1317) was a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelinos fresco. ...


Marriage and children

On 28 May 1262, Philip married Isabella of Aragon, daughter of James I of Aragon and his second wife Yolande of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II of Hungary, and had the following children: May 28 is the 148th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (149th in leap years). ... Events Strasbourg becomes a Free City of the Holy Roman Empire First Visconti become the lord of Iceland swear fealty to the king of Norway, bringing an end to the Icelandic Commonwealth Births Ladislaus IV of Hungary Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona... Isabella of Aragon (1247 – January 28, 1271), infanta of Aragon, was, by marriage, Queen consort of France in the Middle Ages from 1270 to 1271. ... James I of Aragon (Catalan: Jaume I, Spanish: Jaime I, Occitan: Jacme I) (Montpellier, February 2, 1208 – July 27, 1276) surnamed the Conqueror, was the king of Aragon, count of Barcelona and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276. ... Andrew II (Hungarian: András or Endre, Slovak: Ondrej) (c. ...

  1. Louis (1266 – May 1276)
  2. Philip IV (1268 – November 29, 1314), successor as king
  3. Charles (March 12, 1270December 16, 1325), Count of Valois

After Isabella's death, he married on 21 August 1274, Marie de Brabant, daughter of Henry III of Brabant and Adelaide of Burgundy. Their children were: Philip IV the Fair (French: Philippe IV le Bel) (1268 – November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events June 24 - Battle of Bannockburn. ... Charles III of Valois (1270 - 1325) was the third son of Philip III of France and Isabella, daughter of James I. He was the father of Phillip VI, and uncle to three kings ( Louis X, Phillip V, and Charles IV). ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (72nd in leap years). ... For broader historical context, see 1270s and 13th century. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events January 7:Alfonso IV becomes the King of Portugal. ... Counts of Valois Jean-Tristan (1269–1270) in royal domain Charles I (1284–1325) Philip I (1325–1328) in royal domain Philip II (1344–1375) in royal domain Louis I (1386?–1406) Dukes of Valois Charles II (1406–1465) Louis II (1465–1498) in royal domain Marguerite de Valois in... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events May 7 - In France the Second Council of Lyons opens to consider the condition of the Holy Land and to agree to a union with the Byzantine church. ... Maria of Brabant (1256, Leuven – January 12, 1321, Murel), Queen consort of France. ... Henry III of Brabant (c. ...

  1. Louis (May 1276 – May 19, 1319), Count of Évreux
  2. Blanche (1278 – March 19, 1305, Vienna), married Rudolf III of Austria on May 25, 1300
  3. Margaret (1282 – February 14, 1317), married Edward I of England

Louis of France, Count dÉvreux (May, 1276 – May 19, 1319, Paris) was the third son of King Philip III the Bold with his second wife Marie de Brabant, and step-brother of King Philip IV the Fair. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... Events Magnus VII ascends the throne of Norway and unites the country with Sweden. ... Évreux is a commune of Normandy, France, in the Eure département, of which it is the préfecture (capital). ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... Events August 5 - English troops capture William Wallace Wenceslas III becomes king of Bohemia Archbishop of Bordeaux, Bertrand de Got, was elected as Pope Clement V. Philip IV of France accused the Knights Templar of heresy. ... Vienna (German: Wien ) is the capital of Austria, and also one of the nine States of Austria. ... Rudolf I of Habsburg Rudolf I of Habsburg (Czech: ; 1281 – 3/4 July 1307, Horažďovice in Bohemia) was a king of Bohemia (1306–1307) and [[[duke]] of Austria (as Rudolph III), titular King of Poland 1306–1307. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... Marguerite of France (1282 – 14 February 1317) was a daughter of Philip III of France and Maria of Brabant. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events The Great Famine of 1315-1317. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1] and Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who kept Scotland under English domination during his lifetime. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Chaytor, p 105.

Sources

Preceded by
Louis IX
King of France
1270–1285
Succeeded by
Philip IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Philip III of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (325 words)
Philip III the Bold (French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 - October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285.
A member of the Capetian dynasty, he was born in Poissy, the son of Louis IX of France and of Marguerite Berenger of Provence (1221 - 1295).
In the aftermath of this struggle, while retreating from Girona, Philippe III died on October 5, 1285 at Perpignan (in the present-day département of Pyrénées-Orientales).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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