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Encyclopedia > Philip II, Duke of Orléans
Image:Regent-Philippe.JPG
- Philippe of Orléans -

Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, Philippe Charles (August 2, 1674 - December 2, 1723) called Duke of Chartres (1674-1701), and then Duke of Orléans (1701-1723) was Regent of France from 1715 to 1723. His regency being the last in the kingdom of France, he is still commonly referred to as le Régent and his regency as la Régence. photo of painting - public domain The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (215th in leap years), with 151 days remaining. ... Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general (d. ... Events January 18 - Frederick I becomes King of Prussia. ... Duke of Orléans is one of the most important titles in the French peerage, dating back at least to the 14th century. ... A regent is an acting governor. ... Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of the... For related meanings see also Monarch (disambiguation) A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... The era of the French Régence (1715 - 1723) covers the minority of Louis XV, when France was governed by the regent, the child-kings uncle, Philippe dOrléans. ...


He was born in Saint-Cloud, the son of Philip I, Duke of Orléans and his second wife Elisabeth-Charlotte Wittelsbach von Pfalz (b.1652-d.1722). He was also the nephew of king Louis XIV. Saint Cloud or St. ... Philippe I, Duke of Orléans ( September 21, 1640 – June 8, 1701) was the son of the Louis XIII of France and Anne of Austria, and younger brother of Louis XIV of France. ... Elisabeth Charlotte von der Pfalz Elisabeth Charlotte von der Pfalz (Charlotte Elizabeth, Duchesse dOrléans), (May 27, 1652 in Heidelberg - 9 October or December 8, 1722 in St. ... Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638 – September 1, 1715) reigned as King of France and King of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death. ...


He had his first experience of arms at the siege of Mons in 1691. He fought with distinction at Steinkerk, Neerwinden and Namur (1692-1695). During the next few years, being without employment, he studied natural science. Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender October 3 - Treaty of Limerick which guaranteed civil rights to catholics was signed. ... Namur is the name of a city in Belgium, capital of Wallonia, as well as a province and a diocese named after it. ... Events February 13 - Massacre of Glencoe March 1 - The Salem witch trials begin in Salem Village, Massachusetts Bay Colony with the charging of three women with witchcraft. ... Events January 27 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed II to Mustafa II (1695-1703) July 17 - The Bank of Scotland is founded by an Act of Parliament of the old Scottish Parliament. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...


In 1698, he married Françoise-Marie de Bourbon, Mlle de Blois (b.1677-d.1749), the legitimized daughter of Louis XIV and Mme de Montespan. This marriage won him the favor of the king. Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Françoise-Athénaïs de Rochechouart, Mme de Montespan Françoise-Athénaïs of Rochechouart, marquise of Montespan (October 5, 1641 - May 27, 1707) was a mistress of Louis XIV. Born at the chateau of Tonnay-Charente, in todays Charente-Maritime, France, the daughter of Gabriel de...


He was next given a command in Italy (1706) and in Spain (1707-1708) where he gained some important successes, but he cherished lofty ambitions and was suspected of wishing to take the place of Philip V on the throne of Spain. Louis XIV was angry at these pretensions, and for a long time held him in disfavour. In his will, however, he appointed him president of the council of regency of the young king Louis XV (1715). Events May 23 - Battle of Ramillies November 5 - The Dublin Gazette publishes its first edition. ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Act of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J.S. Bach appointed as chamber musician and... hehe ... Louis XV King of France and Navarre Louis XV (February 15, 1710 - May 10, 1774), called the Well-Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was king of France from 1715 to 1774. ... Events September 1 - King Louis XIV of France dies after a reign of 72 years, leaving the throne of his exhausted and indebted country to his great-grandson Louis XV. Regent for the new, five years old monarch is Philippe dOrléans, nephew of Louis XIV. September - First of the...


On the death of Louis XIV (September 1, 1715), the late king's five-year-old great-grandson was crowned king Louis XV of France. The duke of Orléans went to the parlement, had the will annulled, and himself invested with absolute power, and the then forty-one-year-old Philippe became Regent. September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ...


At first he made a good use of this, counselling economy, decreasing taxation, disbanding 25,000 soldiers and restoring liberty to the persecuted Jansenists. But the inquisitorial measures which he had begun against the financiers led to disturbances. He was, moreover, weak enough to countenance the risky operations of the banker John Law (1717), whose bankruptcy, led to a disastrous crisis in the public and private affairs of France. Jansenism was a branch of Christian philosophy founded by Cornelius Jansen (1585-1638), a Flemish theologian. ... There have been a number of famous individuals named John Law: John Law (economist) John Law (sociologist) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events January 4 — The Netherlands, Britain & France sign Triple Alliance March 2 — Dancer John Weaver performs in the first ballet in Britain shown in Drury Lane The Loves of Mars and Venus March 31 - Bishop Benjamin Hoadly, acting on the advice of King George begins the Bangorian Controversy by saying... Bankruptcy is a legally declared inability or impairment of ability of an individual or organization to pay their creditors. ...


There existed a party of malcontents who wished to transfer the regency from Orleans to Philip V, king of Spain. A conspiracy was formed, under the inspiration of Cardinal Alberoni, first minister of Spain, and directed by the Prince of Cellamare, Spanish ambassador in France, with the complicity of the duke and duchess of Maine the legitimized son of Louis XIV; but in 1718 it was discovered and defeated. Guillaume Dubois, formerly tutor to the duke of Orleans, and now his chief minister, caused war to be declared against Spain, with the support of the emperor, and of England and Holland (Quadruple Alliance). After some successes of the French marshal, the Duke of Berwick, in Spain, and of the imperial troops in Sicily, Philip V made peace with the regent (1720). This is a list of counts and dukes of Maine, France. ... Events May 15 - James Puckle, a London lawyer, patents the worlds first machine gun. ... Guillaume Dubois (September 6, 1656 - August 10, 1723) was a French cardinal and statesman. ... This page is a list of French prime ministers. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion... Holland is the common name in English referring to the Kingdom of the Netherlands (or exclusively its European part)--although this is incorrect from a Dutch perspective. ... The term Quadruple Alliance refers to several historical military alliances; none of which remain in effect. ... The Marshal of France (maréchal de France) was one of the Great Officers of the Crown of France. ... James FitzJames, 1st Duke of Berwick-upon-Tweed (August 21, 1670- June 12, 1734) was a French military leader, illegitimate son of King James II of England and VII of Scotland by Arabella Churchill. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ...


On the majority of the king, which was declared on the isth of February 1723, the duke of Orleans resigned the supreme power; but he became first minister to the king, and remained in office till his death on December 23, 1723. He died at the Palace of Versailles and was buried in the city of his birth, Saint-Cloud. Versailles: Louis Le Vau opened up the interior court to create the expansive entrance cour dhonneur, later copied all over Europe The Château de Versailles — often called the Palace of Versailles, or simply Versailles — is a royal château, outside the gates of which the village of Versailles, France, has...


Philippe had only one son: Louis, duke of Orléans (1703-1752). Louis of Bourbon Duke of Orléans (August 4, 1703 - February 4, 1752) was the only son of Philippe II of Orléans, the regent Orléans. ...


The regent had great qualities, both brilliant and solid, which were unfortunately spoilt by an excessive taste for pleasure. His dissolute manners found only too many imitators, and the regency was one of the most corrupt periods in French history.


Philippe was a professed atheist who boasted to read the satirical works of François Rabelais inside a Bible binding during mass, and liked to hold orgies even on religious high holidays. He acted in plays of Molière and Racine, composed the music for an opera, and was a gifted painter and engraver. Atheism is the state either of being without theistic beliefs, or of actively disbelieving in the existence of deities. ... François Rabelais (ca. ... The Bible (From Greek (τα) βιβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, plural of βιβλιον, biblion, book, originally a diminutive of βιβλος, biblos, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos, meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this writing material), is a word applied to sacred scriptures. ... Mass is a property of physical objects that, roughly speaking, measures the amount of matter they contain. ... Orgy has several meanings, including a drunken revelry, a religious rite involving ecstatic dancing, an unrestrained indulgence (for example, an orgy of destruction), or group sexual activity. ... Molière, engraved frontispiece to his Works Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, better known as Molière (January 15, 1622 – February 17, 1673), was a French theatre writer, director and actor, one of the masters of comic satire. ... Racine is the name of several communities in the United States of America: Racine, Minnesota Racine, Missouri Racine, Ohio Racine, West Virginia Racine, Wisconsin Racine County, Wisconsin It is also the name of dramatist Jean Racine. ... This article is about opera as an art form. ... Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. ...


A liberal and imaginative man, he was however, often weak, inconsistent and vacillating. Nonetheless, as Regent, he changed the manners of the ruler and his nobles from the hypocrisy of Louis XIV to complete candor. He was against censorship and ordered the reprinting of books banned under the reign of his uncle. Reversing his uncle's policies again, Philippe formed an alliance with England, Austria, and the Netherlands, and fought a successful war against Spain that established the conditions of a European peace. In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism —an ideology espousing liberty. ... Censorship is the systematic use of group power to broadly control freedom of speech and expression, largely in regard to secretive matters. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Religion...


Philippe promoted education, making the Sorbonne tuition free and opening the Royal Library to the public (1720). He is however most remembered for the debauchery he brought to Versailles and for the John Law banking scandal. The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The Sorbonne today, from the same point of view The historic University of Paris (French: Université de Paris) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganized as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... The new buildings of the library. ... Events January 6 - The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings February 11 - Sweden and Prussia sign the (2nd Treaty of Stockholm) declaring peace. ... Versailles, formerly the capital city of the kingdom of France, is now a wealthy suburb of Paris and is still an important administrative and judicial center. ... There have been a number of famous individuals named John Law: John Law (economist) John Law (sociologist) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica ( 1911) in many ways represents the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ...


 
 

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