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Encyclopedia > Philanthropy

Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. In a more fundamental sense, philanthropy may encompass any altruistic activity which is intended to promote good or improve human quality of life. Someone who is well known for practicing philanthropy may sometimes be called a philanthropist. Although such individuals are often very wealthy, people may nevertheless perform philanthropic acts without possessing great wealth. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... A Donation is a gift given, typically to a cause or/and for charitable purposes. ... Altruism refers to both a practice or habit (in the view of many, a virtue) as well as an ethical doctrine. ... This article is about the economic and philosophical concept. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ...


Philanthropy is a major source of income for artistic, musical, religious, and humanitarian causes, as well as educational institutions ranging from schools to universities (see patronage). This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Religious is a term with both a technical definition and folk use. ... Humanitarianism is the view that all people should be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve as human beings, and that advancing the well-being of humanity is a noble goal. ... ...


During the past few years, philanthropy has become more mainstream in terms of press coverage, owing to the high profile of rock star Bono's campaign to alleviate Third World debt to developed nations; the Gates Foundation's massive resources and ambitions, such as its campaigns to eradicate malaria and river blindness; and billionaire investor and Berkshire Hathaway Chair Warren Buffett's donation in 2006 of $30 billion to the Gates Foundation. For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is the worlds largest charitable foundation, endowed by Bill Gates, chairman and founder of Microsoft, and his wife, Melinda Gates. ... Malaria is a vector-borne infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites. ... Onchocerciasis or river blindness is the worlds second leading infectious cause of blindness. ... Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRKA, NYSE: BRKB) is a conglomerate holding company headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, U.S., that oversees and manages a number of subsidiary companies. ... Warren Edward Buffett (born August 30, 1930, in Omaha, Nebraska) is an American investor, businessman and philanthropist. ...

Contents

Philosophical views on philanthropy

Philanthropy is not always viewed as a universal good. Notable thinkers such as Friedrich Nietzsche opposed philanthropy on philosophical grounds, connecting it with the idea of the weak sponging off the strong, a view sometimes endorsed by those who oppose government welfare programs. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philologist and philosopher. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about financial assistance paid by government organizations. ...


The purpose of philanthropy is also debated. Some equate philanthropy with benevolence and charity for the poor and needy. Others hold that philanthropy can be any altruistic giving towards any kind of social need that is not served, underserved, or perceived as unserved or underserved by the market. A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... Altruism refers to both a practice or habit (in the view of many, a virtue) as well as an ethical doctrine. ... Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Some believe that philanthropy can be a means to build community by growing community funds and giving vehicles. When communities see themselves as being resource rich instead of asset poor, the community is in a better position to solve community problems.


Philanthropy responds to either present or future needs.[1] The charitable response to an impending disaster is an essential function of philanthropy.[1] It offers immediate honor for the philanthropist, yet requires no foresight. Responding to future needs, however, draws on the donor's foresight and wisdom, but seldom recognizes the donor.[1] Prevention of future needs will often avert far more hardship than a response after the fact.[1] For example, the charities responding to starvation from overpopulation in Africa are afforded swift recognition.[2] Meanwhile, philanthropists behind the U.S. population movement of the 1960s and 1970s were never recognized, and are lost to history.[1]


Political views on philanthropy

Philanthropy should be a private sector means of affecting social change without recourse to government mechanisms such as those represented by aid programs. The private sector of a nations economy consists of all that is outside the state. ... Social change (or Social development) is a general term which refers to: change in the nature, the social institutions, the social behaviour or the social relations of a society, community of people, or other social structures. ... Look up Aid in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


People are often supportive of philanthropic efforts. In many countries, those who donate money to a charity are given a title of good or one of great. Some governments are suspicious of philanthropic activities as possible grabs for favor,yet they allow for special interest groups (and votes/power in democracies) of portions of the population by non-governmental organizations. Philanthropics desire a government by the people who need them most and who have the least say. NGO redirects here. ...


Social activism and philanthropy

Social activists frequently criticize philanthropic contributions by corporations whom activists consider suspect. Harvard University divested itself of Exxon stock after pressure and accusations that Exxon's business activities in South Africa contributed to apartheid. But when asked if they still wanted to receive philanthropic contributions from Exxon, Harvard said "yes". Some[attribution needed] considered this morally inconsistent, others[attribution needed] would consider it a warranted penance. If Harvard remained a stockholder, it could have voted to stop operations in the country. Instead, it sold the stock in protest. Harvard redirects here. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ...


Uses of the word

Conventional Usage

By the conventional definition of philanthropy, donations are dedicated to a narrowly defined cause and the donation is targeted to make a recognizable change in social conditions. This often necessitates large donations and financial support sustained over time.


The need for a large financial commitment creates a distinction between philanthropy and charitable giving, which typically plays a supporting role in a charitable organization initiated by someone else. Thus, the conventional usage of philanthropy applies mainly to wealthy persons, and sometimes to a trust created by a wealthy person with a particular cause or objective targeted. This article is about charitable organizations. ... Wealth usually refers to money and property. ... A charitable trust is a trust established for charitable purposes. ...


Many non-wealthy persons have dedicated – thus, donated – substantial portions of their time, effort and wealth to charitable causes. These people are not typically described as philanthropists because individual effort alone is seldom recognized as instigating significant change. These people are thought of as charitable workers but some people wish to recognize these people as philanthropists in honor of their efforts.


A growing trend in philanthropy is the development of giving circles, whereby individual donors -- often a group of friends -- pool their charitable donations and decide together how to use the money to benefit the causes they care about most. Giving Circles are a form of philanthropy consisting of groups of individuals who pool their funds intended for donation and seek to increase their awareness and engagement in the process of giving. ...


See also

For the ethical doctrine, see Altruism (ethics). ... Charity Navigator is an independent, non-profit organization that evaluates American charities. ... This article is about charitable organizations. ... Charitable contribution deductions for United States Federal Income Tax purposes are defined in section 170(c) of the Internal Revenue Code as contributions to or for the use of certain listed nonprofit enterprises. ... Charity fraud is the act of using deception to get money from people who are making donations to charities. ... In modern usage, the practice of charity means the giving of help to those in need. ... Subcategories There is 1 subcategory to this category. ... Development Ratings is part of a growing sector in philanthropy that the Monitor Institute, a leading think tank on philanthropy, has termed infrastructure. According to Monitor, these are organisations that attempt to fix some of the failings of philanthropy by enabling greater sharing of information and best practices, as well... A charitable foundation is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations that either donate funds and support to other organizations, or provide the sole source of funding for their own activities. ... Freelanthropy was started in 2004 to help non-profit organizations raise money online. ... Giving Circles are a form of philanthropy consisting of groups of individuals who pool their funds intended for donation and seek to increase their awareness and engagement in the process of giving. ... GlobalGiving (formerly known as DevelopmentSpace) is a unique service that directly connects donors with grassroots projects in the developing world. ... Misanthrope redirects here. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Children cart dirt and debris away during a community clean-up day in Yaoundé, Cameroon. ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... Youth philanthropy is, at the broadest level, youth giving of their time, talents and treasure. ...

Lists

List of wealthiest foundations is an annotated list of the largest foundations and other charitable organizations, organised by country and size of financial endowment. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Rohe, John F. (2002-01-01). "Chapter 6: Prophesy and Charity", Mary Lou and John Tanton: A Journey into American Conservation. FAIR Horizon Press. ISBN 978-0971007901. 
  2. ^ Buzz (news and commentary blog). onPhilanthrophy.

External links

Look up Philanthropy in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... The Hudson Institute is a right-leaning U.S. think tank, founded in 1961 in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, by the futurist Herman Kahn and other colleagues from the RAND Corporation. ... In modern usage, the practice of charity means the giving of help to those in need. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ... Tzedakah (Hebrew: צדקה) in Judaism, is the Hebrew term most commonly translated as charity, though it is based on a root meaning justice .(צדק). Judaism is very tied to the concept of tzedakah, or charity, and the nature of Jewish giving has created a North American Jewish community that is very philanthropic. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... For the ethical doctrine, see Altruism (ethics). ... Love gift Man presents a cut of meat to a youth with a hoop. ... A Donation is a gift given, typically to a cause or/and for charitable purposes. ... Alternative giving or virtual giving is a form of gift giving where the donor, instead of buying a gift for the recipient, makes a donation to a charitable organization in the recipient’s name and the organization provides a certificate or card for the recipient. ... Youth philanthropy is, at the broadest level, youth giving of their time, talents and treasure. ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... Charitable contribution deductions for United States Federal Income Tax purposes are defined in section 170(c) of the Internal Revenue Code as contributions to or for the use of certain listed nonprofit enterprises. ... In French, noblesse oblige means, literally, nobility obliges. // Noblesse oblige is generally used to imply that with wealth, power, and prestige come social responsibilities. ... NGO redirects here. ... A charitable trust is a trust established for charitable purposes. ... A foundation is a legal categorization of nonprofit organizations. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nonprofit. ... This article is about charitable organizations. ... Charity Navigator is an independent, non-profit organization that evaluates American charities. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Charity badge - a widget used on web-sites, blogs, social networks or e-mail for promotion of some humanitarian initiative, mainly gathering donation for charity projects. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Philanthropy - definition of Philanthropy in Encyclopedia (248 words)
Philanthropy involves the donation or granting of money to various worthy charitable causes.
Philanthropy is a major source of income for artistic, musical, religious, and humanitarian causes.
Notable thinkers such as Friedrich Nietzsche objected to philanthropy on philosophical grounds, connecting it with the idea of the weak leeching off the strong.
Philanthropy (1279 words)
It has enabled the establishment of numerous educational and cultural institutions of national and international renown and has supported the development of a network of charities that have improved the health and social welfare of metropolitan area residents.
Subsequently, philanthropy changed its course by spawning its own enduring charitable institutions, which have changed both the scope and character of giving.
While early philanthropic giving by wealthy individuals was profoundly shaped by the interests and values of the donors, foundation philanthropy gradually became the purview of professional staff who deliberate over formal grant requests.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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