FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Philadelphia accent
City Hall

The Philadelphia Dialect is the accent of English spoken in Philadelphia and extending into Philadelphia's suburbs in the Delaware Valley and southern New Jersey. It is one of the best-studied dialects of American English due to the fact that Philadelphia's University of Pennsylvania is the home institution of William Labov, one of the most productive American sociolinguists. Unlike the dialects found in much of the rest of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia accent shares several unusual features with the New York accent, although it is a distinct dialect region. The Philadelphia accent is, however, in most respects the same as the accents of Wilmington, Delaware and Baltimore, together with which it constitutes what Labov describes as the Mid-Atlantic States dialect region. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 930 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Philadelphia City Hall and Clothespin (1976 sculpture by Claes Oldenburg). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 930 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Philadelphia City Hall and Clothespin (1976 sculpture by Claes Oldenburg). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... The Delaware Valley is the name of the metropolitan area centered on the city of Philadelphia in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For dialects of programming languages, see Programming language dialect. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-02-04, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Sociolinguistics is the study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context on the way language is used. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The variation of the English language spoken in the New York City and North Jersey region is often considered to be one of the most recognizable accents within American English. ... : Chemical Capital of the World , Corporate Capital of the World , Credit Card Capital of the World : A Place to Be Somebody United States Delaware New Castle 17. ... Baltimorese, sometimes phonetically written Bawlmerese or Ballimerese, is a dialect of American English which originated among the white blue-collar residents of working class South and Southeast Baltimore. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ...

Contents

Scope

Actual Philadelphia accents are seldom heard nationally (Philadelphia natives who attain national prominence usually make an effort to tone down or eliminate distinctive pronunciations that would sound dissonant to non-natives). Movies and television shows set in the Philadelphia region generally make the mistake of imbuing the characters with a working class New York accent (specifically heard in Philly-set movies such as the Rocky series, Invincible, and A History of Violence) that is unlike how Philadelphians actually speak. A contrary example is the character of Lynn Sear (played by Toni Collette) in The Sixth Sense, who speaks with an accurate Philadelphia accent. For other uses, see Rocky (disambiguation). ... Invincible is a 2006 film directed by Ericson Core set in 1976. ... A History of Violence is 2005 film, directed by David Cronenberg. ... Toni Collette (born November 1, 1972) is an Academy Award-nominated Australian actress and musician. ... For the ability sometimes referred to as sixth sense, see Extra-sensory perception. ...


The use of geographically inaccurate accents is also true in movies and television programs set in Atlantic City (or any other region of South Jersey), where the characters are often imbued with a supposed "Joisey" accent, when in reality the New York-influenced dialect for New Jersey natives is almost always exclusive to the extreme northeastern region of the state nearest New York City. The dialect and accent for speakers in South Jersey is vastly similar to that of Philadelphians. Alternate meanings: See Atlantic City (disambiguation) Atlantic City is a city located in USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 40,517. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For a small state, New Jersey is dialectally quite diverse, with two regions of the state overlapping with other dialect areas, New York and Philadelphia, and several autochthonous dialects. ... Metropolitan statistical areas and divisions of New Jersey; counties shaded in blue hues are in the New York City metro; counties shaded in green hues are in the Philadelphia metro. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Realizations

Rocky
Rocky

The precise realizations of features of the Philadelphia accent vary to some degree among different ethnic groups, social classes, and parts of the Philadelphia region. The general phonological features of the accent, however, are as follows: Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 666 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1333 × 1200 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions Originally from en. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 666 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1333 × 1200 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions Originally from en. ... Phonology (Greek phonē = voice/sound and logos = word/speech), is a subfield of linguistics which studies the sound system of a specific language (or languages). ...

  • Philadelphia is resistant to the cot-caught merger because the vowel phoneme of words like caught, cloth, and dawn is raised to a high [ɔ], increasing its distance from the [ɑ] of cot. Philadelphia shares this feature with New York and southern New England.
  • On is pronounced /ɔn/, so that, as in the South and Midland varieties of American English (and unlike New York and the northern U.S.) it rhymes with dawn rather than don.[citation needed]
  • The /oʊ/ of goat and boat is fronted, so it is pronounced [ɞʊ], as in the Midland and South. /aʊ/ as in house and loud is fronted as well—sometimes even more extremely, reaching as far as [ɛɔ] for some speakers. (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006: 144, 237).
  • As in New York English and Australian English, the phoneme /æ/ has split into two phonemes, so that Philadelphians have different vowels for example in mad and sad. Fewer words have the "tense" phoneme, /eə/ in Philadelphia than in New York City; for more details on both the Philadelphia and New York systems see: phonemic æ-tensing in the Mid-Atlantic region.
  • As in New York, Boston, and most accents of English outside North America, there is a three-way distinction between Mary, marry, and merry. However in Philadelphia some speakers have a merger of /ɛ/ and /ʌ/ before /r/ (the furry-ferry merger), so that merry is merged instead with Murray. Labov, Ash, and Boberg (2006: 54) report that about one third of Philadelphia speakers have this merger, one third have a near-merger, and one third keep the two distinct. Relatedly, many words like orange, Florida, and horrible have /ɑ/ before /r/ rather than the /ɔr/ used in many other American accents (See: Historic "short o" before intervocalic r).
  • Many words ending in -ow or -no, such as window, widow, tomato, or casino, are pronounced with an -a ending. Thus, windows would be pronounced windas.[citation needed]
  • Unlike many of the urban areas of the eastern seaboard (Boston, Providence, New York, Richmond, Charleston), Philadelphia has never had non-rhoticity as a widespread feature among white speakers; however, there is some sporadic non-rhoticity found especially in South Philadelphia.
  • Canadian raising occurs for /aɪ/ (as in price) but not for /aʊ/ (as in mouth) (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006: 114-15, 237-38).
  • There is a (non-phonemic) split of /eɪ/ (face) so at the end of a word (for example, day) it has an open starting point and is similar to the [æɪ] found in Australian and New Zealand English, while in any other position (for example, date) it is pronounced more like [i] (Labov, Ash, and Boberg 2006: 237). Pairs of words which may be confused as a result of this development include eight and eat, snake and sneak, slave and sleeve.
  • Back vowels preceding /r/ are raised: /ɔr/ as in tore is raised to the vicinity of [ur] and merges or comes close to merging with /ur/ as in tour. Behind it, /ɑr/ as in tar is raised to [ɔr].
  • The word water is commonly pronounced /wʊdər/ (with the first syllable identical to the word wood, so that it sounds somewhat like wooder.)[1][2] This is considered by many to be the defining characteristic of the Philadelphia accent.
  • The interjection "yo" was popularized (and possibly originated in its current meaning) in Philadelphia dialect among Italian American and African American Philadelphians. Today, Philadelphia natives in general are known to commonly use the interjection.
  • Both long -e and long -a sounds are shortened before -g. Eagle rhymes with "Iggle". League rhymes with big. Vague and plague rhyme with Peg. For some Philadelphians, colleague and fatigue also rhyme with big. But these are words learned later, so many use the standard American "coleeg" and "fateeg."
  • Many Philadelphians use the dark l in all positions.
  • The sibilant /s/ is often palatalized to [ʃ] ("sh").
  • In words like gratitude, beautiful, and prostitute, the "i" may be pronounced with a long "ee" sound ([i]).

// The father-bother merger is a merger of the Early Modern English vowels and that occurs in almost all varieties of North American English (exceptions are accents in northeastern New England (such as the Boston accent) and New York-New Jersey English. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... The New York dialect of the English language is spoken by most European Americans who were raised in New York City and much of its metropolitan area including the lower Hudson Valley, western Long Island, and in northeastern New Jersey. ... Australian English (AuE, AusE, en-AU) is the form of the English language used in Australia. ... // Trap-bath split The trap-bath split is a vowel split that occurs mainly in southern varieties of English English (including Received Pronunciation), in the Boston accent, and in the Southern Hemisphere accents (Australian English, New Zealand English, South African English), by which the Early Modern English phoneme was lengthened... The Boston accent is found not only in the city of Boston, Massachusetts itself but also much of eastern Massachusetts. ... The English language has undergone a number of phonological changes before the historic phoneme . ... The English language has undergone a number of phonological changes before the historic phoneme . ... The English language has undergone a number of phonological changes before the historic phoneme . ... Categories: US geography stubs ... “Providence” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Nickname: Motto: Aedes Mores Juraque Curat (She cares for her temples, customs, and rights) Location of Charleston in South Carolina. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... South Philadelphia district, highlighted on map of Philadelphia County. ... Canadian raising is a phonetic phenomenon that occurs in varieties of the English language, especially Canadian English, in which diphthongs are raised before voiceless consonants (e. ... New Zealand English (NZE) is the English spoken in New Zealand. ... Phonemic differentiation is the phenomenon of a phoneme in a language splitting into two phonemes over time, a process known as a phonemic split. ... For other uses, see Yo (disambiguation). ... An Italian-American is an American of Italian descent either born in America or someone who has immigrated. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A dark l is a common way of referring to a velarised alveolar lateral approximant. ...

See also

Philadelphia Portal

Liberty Bell; public domain. ...

External links

References

  • Labov, Wiliam, Sharon Ash, and Charles Boberg (2006). The Atlas of North American English. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter. ISBN 3-11-016746-8. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Philadelphia Accent (812 words)
There is a distinctive accent that many people in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania region speak with, and although it may have legitimate historical origins, deriving from Welsh immigrants and so on, it is not uncommon to hear outsiders complaining that the Philly accent is, or has become, rather ugly.
An additional complaint is often subsequently lodged that the Philly accent is an incorrect and unstable manner of speech that besides grating on the ears also involves word alterations and apparently requires awkward ad hoc fixes as a result.
The Philadelphia accent seems to me to be unstable, for the simple reason that it seems to require more on-the-fly or ad hoc solutions by speakers to make it sound less awkward than other accents of English.
Philadelphia accent - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (365 words)
The Philadelphia accent, the accent of American English spoken in and around Philadelphia, varies among different ethnic groups and to a minor extent among different neighborhoods.
As in New York, Boston, and most accents of English outside North America, there is a three-way distinction between Mary, marry, and merry.
However in Philadelphia some speakers have a merger of /ɛ/ and /ʌ/ before /r/ (the furry-ferry merger), so that merry is merged instead with Murray.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m