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Encyclopedia > Phi Sigma Kappa
Phi Sigma Kappa - ΦΣK
Founded March 15, 1873 (1873-03-15) (age 134)
Massachusetts Agricultural College
Type Social
Scope International
Motto Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
Colors Silver and Red
Symbol The Triple T's
Flower Red Carnation & White Tea Rose
Chapters 79+
Cardinal Principles To Promote Brotherhood, To Stimulate Scholarship, To Develop Character
Headquarters 2925 East 96th Street
Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Homepage phisigmakappa.org

Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. It was founded on March 15, 1873 by Jabez William Clay, Frederick George Campbell, Joseph Franklin Barrett, Xenos Young Clark, William Penn Brooks, and Henry Hague at Massachusetts Agricultural College in Amherst (now the University of Massachusetts). Phi Sigma Kappa merged with Phi Sigma Epsilon in 1985. Image File history File links PSK_crest_bold. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This page is about the university system across Massachusetts. ... Phi Sigma Epsilon was a North American social fraternity that operated for 75 years (20 February 1910 - 14 August 1985) until it merged with the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. ...

Contents

History

The Beginning

Massachusetts Agricultural College in Amherst-now the University of Massachusetts-is the setting for the founding of Phi Sigma Kappa. Among its other students in the early 1870s, it had attracted six men of varied backgrounds, ages, abilities, and goals in life who saw the need for a new and different kind of society on campus. These, the Founders, were very intelligent and creative. Jabez William Clay is recalled to have designed a fake initiation ritual with the intention of scaring another student as a prank. It is then recalled that Henry Hague suggested that, since the six were close and were not interested in the fraternities on campus, they create their own. They banded together in their sophomore year (1873) to form a "society to promote morality, learning and social culture." The center of the UMass Amherst campus. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This page is about the university system across Massachusetts. ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ...


The Founding Fathers

Image:JW Clay.jpg
Jabez William Clay Image File history File links Jabez William Clay Founding Father of Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Image:FG Campbell.jpg
Frederick George Campbell Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Image:JF Barrett.jpg
Joseph Franklin Barrett Image File history File links Joseph Franklin Barrett File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Image:XY Clark.jpg
Xenos Young Clark Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Image:WP Brooks.jpg
William Penn Brooks Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Image:H Hague.jpg
Henry
Hague Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

The six founders were typically active college students, members of literary and academic societies and athletic groups, and editors of campus publications. Hague and Brooks even ran the college store. On March 15, 1873, they met in secret. Brooks had already prepared a constitution and symbolism, and Hague had designed a ritual. The first meeting seemed destined to succeed for they all had done their work well. The ritual has been changed only six times since, and never drastically. Clay was elected president of the group which for its first five years had no name. Its cryptic characters could not be pronounced, either (a problem which they had not really considered since it was a secret society). Outsiders referred to them by names such as "T, double T, T upside-down," "The Huddlers," and others. is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


The Grand Chapter

The Grand Chapter was organized in 1878, to tie alumni and undergraduates in a continuing relationship, and Charles Sumner Howe, an 1876 initiate, was elected its first Grand President (at the age of 20). Phi Sigma Kappa was adopted as the group's official name that same year after four years of debate and the work of seven committees. It is organized much like the Federal Government into three branches: Legislative, Executive, and Juidicial powers. Under the Laws of the State of Delaware, the legislative branch comprises officers from each chapter who serve as delegates at the General Convention. Depending on the size of a particular chapter, each has a number of votes at the Convention to decide on amendments to the Charter, the Constitution, and the Bylaws of the Fraternity. They also have the authority to veto policies made by the Grand Council. The executive branch comprises this Grand Council, which includes the Grand President and his Board of Directors. They serve as the main policy making body of the fraternity. The Judicial Power, known as the Court of Honor, comprises all living past Grand Chapter/Phi Sigma Epsilon Presidents. The presiding officer is the Chancellor, and the Court serves as an advisory committee to the Grand President and the Council, as well as the court of impeachment for any officer of the Fraternity.


Expansion

Originally, only one chapter was contemplated by the founders. And although the germ of expansion arrived early, its period of gestation consumed 13 years. As early as 1875 an inquiry had been received from a group at Maine Agricultural College, and a few years later there was an unexpected letter from the University of New Mexico-but nothing came of either "feeler." In 1878, John A. Cutter was inducted into the group, a man destined to have much to do with the preservation of the order's early records and with its expansion beyond the confines of the Massachusetts campus. He later attended Albany Medical College (in 1873 merged with Union College) and established a group, which became Beta Chapter. Cutter was also instrumental in the establishment of Gamma at Cornell. The transition to a national order was accomplished. These same early years saw the pin (or badge) adopted essentially as it is today; an induction ritual, which embodied the concept of universal brotherhood and expanded the order's horizons beyond Massachusetts, was written in 1890; and the first chapter out of the Northeast came into being at West Virginia University (1891). The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public university in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... Albany Medical College is a medical school located in Albany, New York, United States. ... This article is about the Union College in New York. ... Cornell redirects here. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys...


The Creed and Cardinal Principles

The 1934 Convention in Ann Arbor brought more changes for the fraternity. Brother Stewart W. Herman of Gettysburg wrote and presented the Creed, and Brother Ralph Watts of Massachusetts drafted and presented the Cardinal Principles. More than a half-century later they stand as Phi Sigma Kappa's heritage personified, as much a part of the Fraternity's individuality as any of its more ancient rituals and symbolism.


The Phi Sigma Kappa Creed

In the firm conviction that my Fraternity demands of me a life of Faith and Purpose


I hereby solemnly declare My Faith in the wisdom and love of God; in the dignity and worth of my fellowmen; in the strength and beauty of true Fraternity; in the history and future of my Country; and in the traditions and program of my Alma Mater.


Henceforward, therefore, it shall be My Purpose to remain forever true to this, my fraternity's faith in me and in turn to preserve and promote courageously and unselfishly the chosen ideals of our mutual affection and common endeavor.


To this end I dedicate My Life to the maintenance of this Faith and the pursuit of this Purpose so that the ideals of Phi Sigma Kappa, being embodied in me, may be fulfilled in my Character and Conduct, and be known and honored by all men.


By these things I stand.


The Phi Sigma Kappa Cardinal Principles

To Promote Brotherhood.


Justice, harmony, and brotherly love are essential to the spirit of fraternity. We promise to set an example of true brotherhood not only in our relations with each other, but in our association with people everywhere.


To Stimulate Scholarship.


Wisdom comes with learning. Complementing the mission of higher education, we seek to help our members to combine formal and informal learning experience; to more fully appreciate the importance of both theoretical and practical knowledge; and, by broadening their understanding of human relationships, to produce men of wisdom who will be better prepared to make positive contributions to society and all mankind.


To Develop Character.


Honor is the basis of fraternal relationships. We resolve to instill in each member a devotion to those values which will guide him to ends that are noble and right, so that in all that he represents and in all that he does, he shall be known as a man of honor who inspires others by his example and thus wins admiration and respect for himself and for Phi Sigma Kappa.


World War II

The 1938 Convention adopted the six-degree membership structure to honor the six Founders, especially as a tribute to Founder Brooks, who had died only a few weeks earlier. The first professional manager of the Fraternity was hired that same year, marking still another organizational response to growing need in a critical period. The hardships of World War I and the Great Depression were scarcely overcome when World War II arrived. The extraordinary efforts by which the Fraternity survived are another and longer story; the important fact is that Phi Sig did survive. The 1948 Convention in Boston marked the 75th anniversary of the founding. There were 52 active chapters; the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation had been established, primarily to reward good scholarship among brothers; and the Signet was guaranteed to all members for life under a plan that had few parallels in the Greek world at that time.


Turbulent Times

The post World War II era saw the Fraternity recover from the worst consequences of that crisis, after which Phi Sigma Kappa and all Greek organizations had to address issues related to membership restrictions, hazing, and the need for responsible programming which complements the educational mission of our host institutions. We have responded to these challenges by removing unwarranted restrictions on qualifications for membership, acting in concert with other NIC fraternities to eliminate hazing, and revising our membership education program to reflect its purpose of building a true appreciation of our fraternal principles. Still, another challenge to fraternities occurred with the anti-Greek feeling which spread throughout the country in the late 1960s and 1970s. Membership in Greek organizations declined significantly during these years, and a number of chapters were lost.


Racism Controversy

Although the Grand Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa had never previously provided restrictions on membership in its written charter or regulations, an informal "Gentleman's Agreement" encouraged local chapters not to admit minorities to membership.[citation needed] In a letter dated June 28, 1954, D.R. "Spec" Collins, the then-President of Phi Sigma Kappa, announced that from his point of view, "the entire fraternity system-which is truly an American institution engaged in the service of building good American citizens–is being challenged. Challenged by those subversive elements who, by encouraging us to quarrel among ourselves may cause us to destroy ourselves. The 'divide and conquer strategy' that might well eliminate a great American institution." [1] According to President Collins, members should be warned that an anti-discrimination issue would be raised at the next Phi Sigma Kappa convention, and that members should guard against "subversive elements." [2] is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At Phi Sigma Kappa's 1952 General Convention in Roanoke, Virginia, Phi Sigma Kappa's formerly unofficial "Gentlemen's Agreement" was written into the national organization's bylaws as the Bedford Resolution and was adopted by a small majority. The Bedford Resolution read, "That the fraternity's tradition be maintained in the sense that there be no pledging or initiating of Negro men until such time as they are acceptable to all chapters." Chapters at Boston University and Knox College were both expelled from the Grand Chapter in 1953 for pledging an African-American student. The Tau Chapter at Dartmouth College disaffiliated from Phi Sigma Kappa, citing racist membership policies of the fraternity as its motivation. It became a local fraternity, keeping the "Phi" of Phi Sigma Kappa" and the "Tau" from being the Tau Corporation of Phi Sigma Kappa, becoming the new organization of Phi Tau, in May 1956. Phi Sigma Kappa repealed the Bedford Resolution at its next General Convention in 1954. For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Knox College is a four-year coeducational private liberal arts college located in Galesburg, Illinois. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Phi Tau is a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Phi Tau is also a commonly used abbreviation for Phi Kappa Tau, a (completely separate) national fraternity found on many college campuses throughout the United States. ...


The Merger

The merger of Phi Sigma Kappa with Phi Sigma Epsilon was first discussed in 1984. The two organizations were placed next to each other during conferences by virtue of the names' similarity, but discovered that they had more in common than the first two letters of their names. PSE's beliefs in justice, wisdom, and honor closely paralleled PSK's cardinal principles of brotherhood, scholarship, and character; and many of their rituals shared similarities as well. It only seemed natural that the two groups come together, and on August 15, 1985, the merger was formalized. At the Convention in 1987 in Long Beach, California, two years following the merger, the crest and flag were changed in order to incorporate the symbolism of Phi Sigma Epsilon. Phi Sigma Epsilon was a North American social fraternity that operated for 75 years (20 February 1910 - 14 August 1985) until it merged with the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


The Fraternity Today

Many new challenges have faced Phi Sigma Kappa over the last decade, including risk management, the decline in interest in joining fraternities, and changes in the whole face of higher education. Differences in opinion led the fraternity to leave the North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC). After an absence from the NIC, Phi Sigma Kappa rejoined in 2006 and continues to play an active role in that organization's leadership. Phi Sigma Kappa remains a vital force in the Greek system by maintaining national service projects, implementing leadership development programs, and running what is considered to be one of the best websites of any fraternity.[citation needed] For non-business risks, see risk or the disambiguation page risk analysis. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...


The Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation

The Foundation, incorporated as an entity separate from the Grand Chapter in 1947, serves as the financial backbone of the fraternity. It is facilitated by a Board of Trustees which appropriates funds for various programs and scholarships administered by the Grand Council. The money for this comes from member dues, pledges, and donations. The Foundation is immensely important to the growth and maintenance of the Fraternity. Some of the programs it funds are Leadership School, Undergraduate Scholarships, the Grand Chapter website, and Regional Conclaves.


Degrees of Membership

  • First Degree: members of undergraduate chapters
  • Second Degree: members elected to symbolic offices
  • Third Degree: alumni and those initiated as graduates, former students, faculty, or honorary members
  • Fourth Degree: members appointed to an office by the Grand Council or Grand President
  • Fifth Degree: members elected to the Grand Council
  • Sixth Degree: members who have been elected Grand President

Flag

The official flag is 7x5 feet in dimension and includes three horizontal bars of equal height. The bottom bar is red and symbolizes First and Second Degree members, the foundation of the fraternity. The middle bar is silver for Third and Fourth Degree members, indicative of the field of fraternal service. The Greek letters ΦΣΚ are located in the center of this bar. The top bar, also red, commemorates Fifth and Sixth Degree members, who are those of Grand Chapter recognition. The silver and red tumbling T's logo inscribed in a triangle of silver is located at the left end of the upper bar. Image File history File links Phi Sigma Kappa Flag File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Local Chapter Executive Board Structure

Each chapter's executive board is composed of six officers according to the ritual of Phi Sigma Kappa:

  • President - Presides over the entire chapter and other executive board members
  • Vice President - Manages chapter committees
  • Secretary - Records the minutes and handles correspondence
  • Treasurer - Works with the chapter's finances
  • Sentinel - Guards and presides over chapter rituals and also manages risk.
  • Inductor - Presides over the current class of associates

Other Officers & Committee Chairman

Depending on their specific size and needs, many chapters have a number of chairmen assigned to a variety of tasks. The specific titles, duties, and organization of these chairmen are suggested by the Grand Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa, but are not regulated and differ greatly between chapters.


Notable Brothers

Main article: List of Notable Phi Sigma Kappa Brothers

This is a list of notable brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa. ...

Chapters

Main article: List of Phi Sigma Kappa Chapters

. ...

See also

Phi Sigma Epsilon was a North American social fraternity that operated for 75 years (20 February 1910 - 14 August 1985) until it merged with the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. ... Phi Tau is a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Phi Tau is also a commonly used abbreviation for Phi Kappa Tau, a (completely separate) national fraternity found on many college campuses throughout the United States. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...

External links

  • Most factual information can be found and verified in the book: "All The Phi Sigs - A History" Copyright 1993. Written by Rand, Frank Prentice; Watts, Ralph; Sefton, James E., Self-published.
  • Phi Sigma Kappa National Website
  • Phi Sigma Kappa Wiki (Site is frequented by malicious spammers)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Phi Sigma Kappa - Epsilon Epsilon Chapter - Our National History (3036 words)
Phi Sigma Kappa was one of the early leaders in such efforts and remains one of the strongest alumni-0oriented groups.
There were 52 active chapters; the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation had been established, primarily to reward good scholarship among brothers; and the SIGNET was guaranteed to all members for life under a plan that had few parallels in the Greek world at that time.
Phi Sigma Epsilon was considered an outlaw organization and frowned upon by many of the college autorities and citizens.
Phi Sigma Kappa - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2374 words)
Phi Sigma Kappa is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character.
Phi Sigma Kappa was adopted as the group's official name that same year-after four years of debate and the work of seven committees.
There were 52 active chapters; the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation had been established, primarily to reward good scholarship among brothers; and the Signet was guaranteed to all members for life under a plan that had few parallels in the Greek world at that time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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