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Encyclopedia > Phi Kappa Psi
Phi Kappa Psi - ΦΚΨ
Founded February 19, 1852 (1852-02-19) (age 155)
Jefferson College
Type Social, Philanthropic
Motto The Great Joy of Serving Others
Colors Cardinal red and hunter green
Flower Jacqueminot Rose
Headquarters Laurel Hall - 5395 Emerson Way
Indianapolis, Indiana 46226, USA
Homepage http://www.phikappapsi.com/

Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Washington and Jefferson College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Washington, Pennsylvania. ... Social or General Fraternities and Sororities, in the North American fraternity system, are those not associated with a particular profession (as Professional fraternities are) or discipline (such as Service fraternities and sororities). ... Philanthropy involves the donation or granting of money to various worthy charitable causes. ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... Camouflage green is a color that resembles the color often used by the military and hunters to camouflage themselves. ... The Jacqueminot or Dark Red Rose is the prototype of the Hybrid Perpetual rose class. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

Contents

History

Phi Kappa Psi was founded in 1852 in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, on the campus of Jefferson College by William Henry Letterman and Charles Page Thomas Moore. It forms the Jefferson Duo along with Phi Gamma Delta, which was founded in 1848, also at Jefferson College. Through long nights of caring for a sick friend during an outbreak of disease, the founders grew to appreciate their service, and decided to form an organization that would ensconce these ideals, and on the dreary night of February 19, 1852, the brotherhood of Phi Kappa Psi was born. 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Canonsburg is a borough in Washington County, Pennsylvania, 18 miles (29 km) southwest of Pittsburgh. ... Washington and Jefferson College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Washington, Pennsylvania. ... William Henry Letterman was a co-founder of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. ... Charles Page Thomas Moore (February 8, 1831 _ July 7, 1904) was a co-founder of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and a justice of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


A full history of the organization and all relevant data can be found at www.phikappapsi.com.


(Note: the Historian of Phi Kappa Psi maintains a Phi Psi 150 Yahoo Group for those interested in the Fraternity's history.) There are also three volumes of fraternity history that have been written and printed that divide Phi Psi's first 150 year history into 50 year spans (the final edition is due to be printed in 2008).


Creed

The creed of Phi Kappa Psi was a result of efforts by John Henry Frizzell (Massachusetts Alpha, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 1898) and Kent Christopher Owen (Indiana Beta, Indiana University, 1958). It was adopted by the Grand Arch Council at Denver in 1964. It reads as follows: For other uses, see Creed (disambiguation). ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


I believe that Phi Kappa Psi is a brotherhood of honorable men, courteous and cultured, who pledge throughout their lives to be generous, compassionate, and loyal comrades;


I believe that I am honor bound to strive manfully for intellectual, moral, and spiritual excellence; to help and forgive my Brothers; to discharge promptly all just debts; to give aid and sympathy to all who are less fortunate;


I believe that I am honor bound to strengthen my character and deepen my integrity; to counsel and guide my Brothers who stray from their obligations; to respect and emulate my Brothers who practice moderation in their manners and morals; to be ever mindful that loyalty to my Fraternity should not weaken loyalty to my college, but rather increase devotion to it, to my country, and to my God;


I believe that to all I meet, wherever I go, I represent not only Phi Kappa Psi, but indeed the spirit of all fraternities; thus I must ever conduct myself so as to bring respect and honor not to myself alone, but also to my Fraternity;


To the fulfillment of these beliefs, of these ideals, in the noble perfection of Phi Kappa Psi, I pledge my life and my sacred honor.


Symbols

The fraternity flag is in the proportions of eight and one-half feet wide by six feet high; the colors are the official fraternity colors; the design is three vertical stripes of equal width, a hunter green in the middle, flanked on either side by a cardinal red stripe.


The Order of the S.C.

The Order of the S.C., formed in 1920, is regarded by Phi Kappa Psi as a "fraternity within a fraternity" and has no peer in the men's fraternity world. Entrance can only be gained by attending at least seven Grand Arch Councils and performing, to the satisfaction of the Order, one or more acts of benefit to the Fraternity. The Order meets every two years, during Phi Kappa Psi's biennial Grand Arch Council. The words which the initials "S.C." represent are held secret by its members, and there are currently more than one hundred living members of the Order who guard its traditions and carry out its work.


Notable Phi Psis

Statistics

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Public Service

Current

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Deceased

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Military

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Arts and Entertainment

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Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Frank Morgan as The Wizard of Oz. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Cornell redirects here. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Honorary statue of James Whitcomb Riley on courthouse lawn in Greenfield, Indiana James Whitcomb Riley (Greenfield, Indiana October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916), American writer and poet called the Hoosier poet and Americas Childrens Poet made a start writing newspaper verse in Hoosier dialect for the Indianapolis Journal... This school is not to be confused with DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, which has a similar pronunciation. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Charles Buddy Rogers (born on August 13, 1904; died on April 21, 1999) was an American actor and jazz musician. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Richard Scheider (born November 10, 1932 in Orange, New Jersey) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Franklin and Marshall College is a four-year private co-educational liberal arts college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Steve Tesich is a Serbian-American Oscar-winning screenwriter and playwright who was born Stojan Tesić in Užice, Yugoslavia (now Serbia and Montenegro) on September 29, 1942. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tony Aiello (born March 6, 1963) is a television reporter for WCBS-TV in New York City. ... WCBS-TV, channel 2, is the flagship station of the CBS television network, located in New York City. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Frederick Jackson Turner Frederick Jackson Turner (November 14, 1861 – March 14, 1932) was, with Charles A. Beard, the least influential American historian of the early 20th century. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Wes Bergmann (born September 10, 1984) is a regular participant on MTV reality shows, infamous for his cocky attitude and his relationship with former roommate Johanna Botta. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Sylvester Pat Weaver (December 21, 1908 - March 17, 2002) was the father of actress Sigourney Weaver. ... An Emmy Award. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Brothers & Sisters character, see Justin Walker Justin Walker is an American actor best known for his portrayal of Christian Stovitz in the 1995 comedy film Clueless. ... House, see Clueless (House episode). ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ...

Sports

Forrest Phog Allen, D.O. (November 18, 1885 – September 16, 1974) was an American collegiate basketball coach known as the Father of Basketball Coaching. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Kevin John Berry (born April 10, 1945 in Sydney) was an Australian butterfly swimmer of the 1960s, who won a gold medal in the 200m butterfly at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Beloit College is a liberal arts college in Beloit, Wisconsin and a member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. ... Terry Bowden is a college football sports commentator for ABC Sports. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys... Jeffrey Howard Cirillo (born September 23, 1969 in Pasadena, California) is a third baseman in Major League Baseball who currently plays for the Milwaukee Brewers. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Jerry Colangelo (born November 20, 1939) is a respected Arizona sports mogul. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Major league affiliations National League (1998–present) West Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Arizona Diamondbacks (1998–present) Other nicknames The D-backs, The Snakes Ballpark Chase Field (1998–present) a. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ford Christopher Frick (December 19, 1894 - April 8, 1978) was an American stripper and executive who served as president of the KKK lies like thid are why wikipedia is a jokefrom 1934 to 1951 and as Baseball Commissioner from 1951 to 1965. ... In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This school is not to be confused with DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, which has a similar pronunciation. ... John G. “Red” Kerr (b. ... NBA redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nile Clarke Kinnick, Jr. ... “Heisman” redirects here. ... Not to be confused with Iowa State University. ... John Michels(born March 19, 1973 in La Jolla, California, is a former NFL offensive tackle. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... Ralph H. Miller (March 9, 1919 – May 15, 2001) was a college mens basketball coach. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ... Texas Earnest Schramm, Jr. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys Team colors Silver, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Northern Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1966) Capitol Division (1967-1969) National Football Conference (1970-present... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Andrew Spitz (born February 10, 1950, in Modesto, California) is a American swimmer. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Dick Tomey (born June 20, 1938, in Bloomington, Indiana) is a football coach. ... This school is not to be confused with DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois, which has a similar pronunciation. ... At the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy, 15 swimming events were contested. ... Indiana University is the principal campus of the Indiana University system. ... George Yardley (November 3, 1928 in Hollywood, California - August 13, 2004 in Newport Beach, California) was an NBA Hall of Famer, the first player in history to score 2,000 points in one season, breaking the 1,932-point record held by fellow Hall of Famer George Mikan. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ... Anthony Ronald Ron Yary (born July 16, 1946) in Chicago, IL, and was a former professional American football player and member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Football Writers Association logo The Outland Trophy is awarded to the best United States college football interior lineman. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ...

Business

Jerry Yang Chih-Yuan (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; born November 6, 1968) is a Taiwanese American entreprenuer, [2] co-founder with David Filo and CEO of Yahoo! Inc. ... “Yahoo” redirects here. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Excite Excite is an Internet portal with an included search engine. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Aquilent, Inc. ... The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) is a public university, part of the University System of Maryland, located in the southwest Baltimore County community of Catonsville. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Ticketmaster is based in West Hollywood, California, USA, but has operations in many countries around the world. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is in need of attention. ... For the national flags of Texas, see Six flags over Texas. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Herbert Henry Dow (1866 — 1930) was a U.S. (Canadian-born) chemical industrialist. ... The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW TYO: 4850) is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Midland, Michigan. ... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), is a four-year public institution located in Ewing Township, New Jersey, a northern suburb of Trenton. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ...

Education

The University of Cincinnati is a coeducational public research university in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Jesuit and Catholic University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Creighton University, founded in 1878, is a Jesuit, Catholic university located in Omaha, Nebraska. ... Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania (known as The Rock or SRU for short) is an American university, and a member of the State System of Higher Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania[1]. It is located in the borough of Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys... Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio. ... Cornell redirects here. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... University of Montana The University of Montana campus, 1999. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Wittenberg University, located in Springfield, Ohio, is a private, four-year liberal arts college affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. ... The College of New Jersey (TCNJ), is a four-year public institution located in Ewing Township, New Jersey, a northern suburb of Trenton. ... Washington and Jefferson College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college located in Washington, Pennsylvania. ...

Miscellaneous

Owen Kay Garriott, Ph. ... For other uses, see Skylab (disambiguation). ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ... Robert Lowry was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 12th March 1826. ... Bucknell University is a private university located along the Susquehanna River in the rolling countryside of Central Pennsylvania in the town of Lewisburg, 60 miles (97 km) north of Harrisburg. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Elliott See Elliott McKay See, Jr. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... David Gardiner Tyler (July 12, 1846-September 5, 1927), U.S. politician, He was born in Easthampton, New York. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Virginia. ...

Endowment Fund

Like many fraternal organizations, the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity maintains an independent endowment for the educational benefit of its members. The Endowment Fund of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity, Inc., organized in 1914, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, public educational foundation. As of December 31st, 2004 the Endowment Fund had net assets of $18,928,712. In 2004 the Endowment Fund spent $1,085,515 on scholarships, grants and other educational activities for the fraternity's members.


Although established in 1914, it was not until the mid-1990s that the Endowment Fund began to flourish. In 1994, net assets totaled a mere $620,503. Ten years later, that amount grew to almost $19 million. In 2004, under the leadership of Tom Pennington, Director of Development, and Wayne Wilson, a probate attorney who serves as volunteer Chairman, the Endowment Fund of the Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity became the largest educational foundation of any American or international collegiate fraternity or sorority. Gifts from wealthy alumni have helped Phi Kappa Psi reach this goal. The fund also relies heavily on smaller contributions to its "Chapter Scholarship Foundation" program, whereby 90% of a donation can be ear-marked for the benefit of a specific chapter. This has spurred giving among those who have a strong connection with the chapter at their collegiate alma mater. The California Delta Chapter at the University of Southern California has the largest Chapter Scholarship Fund, with $1.3 million in 2004.


In 2006, the Endowment Fund and the Fraternity Headquarters moved from its downtown Indianapolis location into its new acquisition, Laurel Hall. Complete with Ruth Lilly Conference Center and public access for special events, this property has enabled Phi Kappa Psi to host national conferences and board meetings as well as gain revenue from rental of the facility to other Indianapolis area citizens. Its website is www.laurel-hall.com.


Current information on the Endowment Fund and its programs may be found at www.pkpfoundation.org.


Chapters

In 2007, the brothers of Pennsylvania Alpha were admitted to their new residence on campus perpetuating their existence and presence on Washington and Jefferson’s campus. The chapter’s lease began during the 2007 fall semester and is contracted to last for thirty years. After much deliberation, the school granted Phi Kappa Psi this opportunity on their philanthropic and behavioral merit. The brothers participated in many activities that help establish growth within their school, their community, and themselves. Furthermore, the chapter attends leadership conferences and many other school programs that promote leadership and other desirable characteristics. A list of chapters of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity. ...


Trivia

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... National Lampoons Animal House is a 1978 comedy film in which a misfit group of fraternity boys take on the system at their college. ...

References

  1. ^ [http://www.acmewebpages.com/animal/locales.htm

See also

Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Phi Kappa Psi - Michigan State University (732 words)
The Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity is a private association of educated men who endeavor to live honorably and humanely.
Yet as Brothers in Phi Kappa Psi, they are vitally united in their dedication to the highest standards of intellectual, emotional, and spiritual integrity.
Phi Kappa Psi alumni are the driving force behind the longevity and success of its chapters.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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