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Encyclopedia > Phi Beta Kappa Society
The Phi Beta Kappa Society

The Phi Beta Kappa Key
The Phi Beta Kappa Key Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 3072 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Motto Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης
Love of learning is the guide of life
Formation December 5, 1776
Type Honor society
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
Location United States
Membership Over 500,000
Official languages English
Secretary John Churchill
Website Phi Beta Kappa Homepage

The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of "fostering and recognizing excellence" in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences.[1] Founded at the College of William and Mary on December 5, 1776, it was the first collegiate organization to adopt a Greek-letter name and is the oldest honor society in the United States.[2] Today there are 276 chapters and over half a million living members.[3] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... In the United States, an honor society is an organization of rank, the induction into which recognizes excellence among ones peers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... In the United States, an honor society is an organization of rank, the induction into which recognizes excellence among ones peers. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Phi Beta Kappa (ΦΒΚ) stands for Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης or philosophia biou kubernetes — "Love of learning is the guide of life."[4]

Contents

Membership

Although each individual chapter determines its specific applicants of the Phi Beta Kappa Council's 1952 Stipulations Concerning Eligibility for Membership and sets its own academic standards, even the most generous chapter will typically elect fewer than 10% among the candidates for degrees at that College of Arts and Sciences.


Phi Beta Kappa is generally considered the most prestigious liberal arts American college honor society,[5] and membership is one of the highest honors that can be conferred on undergraduate liberal arts and science students.


However, in the last two decades, rates of acceptance of Phi Beta Kappa membership invitations by students or "members in course" have significantly dropped. During the last triennial convention held in October 2006, the national secretary (chief executive officer) of Phi Beta Kappa admitted in his annual State of the Society address that:

The data show a generally heartening, but not entirely untroubled picture. At about a third of our chapters, essentially no one turns down the invitation. At almost another third, the acceptance rate is above 80 percent. But at the remaining chapters, almost 100, the rates are lower. At a small number of chapters, the percentage of invited students who are subsequently initiated is as low as 40 percent and 30 percent. Some who have seen these figures question the viability of those campuses as sheltering institutions.[6]

The national secretary then admitted, "It is distressing that anyone should decline this honor. Our aim is to have strong acceptance rates at all our chapters."[6]


History

Student associations of a social nature were formed hundreds of years ago in European universities. These student groups, guilds and other social, literary, and religious associations, existed in Europe over many centuries and in many forms. By the time colleges were founded in the American colonies, however, nearly all traces of student organizations and independence in lifestyle had been eliminated. Thus, the institution of American college Greek-letter fraternities is the unique development of American students.


Of the nine colonial colleges established in the 1600s and 1700s, the College of William and Mary was among the most prominent and had some of the best classroom and residential buildings. Founded in 1693, it is second in age only to Harvard. It was at William and Mary, during the Revolutionary War, that the first Greek-letter college fraternity was established. The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


When the United States Declaration of Independence was read in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776, it proclaimed the right of the colonials to have government "of the people, by the people, and for the people." Adoption of that galvanizing idea soon reached Williamsburg, Virginia, a hotbed of agitation for independence. The flame of revolution spread among students at William and Mary, and they were eager to discuss the burning issues of the day, especially topics more directly affecting student life. The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ...


However, the opportunity for students to form a group and to debate any issue was severely restricted within college walls, so students gathered in the Apollo Room of the Raleigh Tavern in Williamsburg for the limited discussions which were possible. In this atmosphere, on December 5, 1776, five close and trusted friends remained after other students returned to campus. They formed the first permanent Greek-letter society in North America. The name they chose was Phi Beta Kappa (PhiBetaKappa,).


It is believed that Phi Beta Kappa grew out of an older William and Mary organization, founded in 1750, named the Flat Hat Society; notably, Thomas Jefferson was a member. Phi Beta Kappa was, of necessity, a secret society. To protect its members, it had all of the attributes of most modern fraternities--an oath of secrecy, a badge or key, mottos in Greek, an initiation and a handshake. The Flat Hat Club (as it was known outside its membership) or F.H.C. Society was the first of the collegiate secret societies or fraternities founded in the present United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Before the British invasion of Virginia forced closure of the College of William and Mary and the disbandment of Phi Beta Kappa in early 1781, students in New England colleges established other branches of the society. The second chapter was founded at Yale University in late 1780, the third at Harvard University in 1781, and the fourth at Dartmouth College in 1787. From them, Phi Beta Kappa evolved from a fraternity with principally academic and some social purposes to an entirely honorary organization recognizing scholastic achievement. While Phi Beta Kappa developed the distinctive characteristics of Greek-letter fraternities, it was left to other students to fill the natural human need for fellowship with kindred students by extension of fraternity to a social context. “Yale” redirects here. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ...


Further chapters appeared at Union College in 1817, Bowdoin College in 1825, and Brown University in 1830. The original chapter at William & Mary also was reestablished. Secrecy was abandoned in 1831 during a period of strong anti-Masonic sentiment. The first chapter established after becoming an "open" society was at Trinity College in 1845. This article is about the Union College in New York. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ...


As the first collegiate organization of its type to adopt a Greek-letter name, it is generally considered the forerunner of modern college fraternities as well as the model for later honor societies. Ironically, it was partly the rise of true "social" fraternities modeled after Phi Beta Kappa later that century which obviated the social aspects of membership in the organization, transforming it into the honor society it is today. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


By 1883, when the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa were established, there were 25 chapters. The first women were elected to the society at the University of Vermont in 1875, and the first African-American member was elected at the same institution two years later. The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, or simply The University of Vermont, is a public university located in Burlington, Vermont. ...


Each chapter is designated by its state and a Greek letter indicating the order in which that state's chapters were founded. For example, Alpha of Pennsylvania refers to the chapter at Dickinson College (1887); Beta of Pennsylvania at Lehigh University (1887); Gamma of Pennsylvania at Lafayette College (1890); and Delta of Pennsylvania at the University of Pennsylvania (1892). A mermaid sits atop Dickinson Colleges Old West. ... Lehigh University is a private, co-educational university located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, in the Lehigh Valley region of the United States. ... Lafayette College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Easton, Pennsylvania, USA. The school, founded in 1826 by citizens of Easton, first began holding classes in 1832. ... The University of Pennsylvania (also known as Penn[3][4]) is a private, coeducational research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ...


By 1920, there were 89 chapters at a variety of schools. New chapters are continuously added; currently there are 270. In 1988, the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa officially changed its name to The Phi Beta Kappa Society.


In 2005, a controversy surrounding the revocation of a speaking invitation to filmmaker and activist Michael Moore derailed the membership application of George Mason University. Economics Professor James Bennett, faculty senate chairman, was disappointed by the decision, telling the Washington Post that "Phi Beta Kappa is the ultimate recognition of undergraduate academic achievement. We owe it to our students [to establish a chapter]." [1] George Mason will become eligible for consideration again in 2008. Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American political-activist, a film director, author, social commentator, and political humorist. ... George Mason University, also known as GMU or simply Mason, is a public university in the United States. ... ...


The Key

The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key engraved on the obverse with the image of a pointing finger, three stars, and the Greek letters from which the society takes its name. The stars are said today to represent the ambition of young scholars and the three distinguishing principles of the Society: friendship, morality, and learning. On the reverse are found the initials "SP" in script, which stand for the Latin words societas philosophiae, or "society of philosophy".


The "key" of Phi Beta Kappa did not actually begin as a (watch) key in 1776. The first were in fact medallions, or better, watchfobs, essentially squares of metal with a loop forged integrally to the body of the fob in order to allow for suspension from a watch chain. The post or stem, designed for the winding of pocketwatches, did not appear on fobs until the beginning of the 19th century. The fobs weren't even gold at first; the earliest extant 18th century models were made of silver or pewter, and again it was not until the first quarter of the 19th century that gold largely supplanted the use of silver or pewter; some notable exceptions did occur, such as at Harvard, which continued the use of silver or pewter for some of its keys up until the first decade of the 20th century. While several stylistic features have survived since the earliest days - the use of the stars, pointing hand, and Greek letters on the obverse, for example - a number of differences are noted with older keys when compared to more modern examples. For one, the name of the recipient was not engraved on the earliest fobs or keys, and it was not until the first decade of the 19th century that examples are known on which is engraved the name of the recipient of the honor. The name of the school from which the fob or key came was also not routinely included on the earliest models, and sometimes the only way to trace a key to a particular school's chapter is by researching the name of the recipient against surviving class records (which is possible only regarding keys with the owner's name engraved). The number of stars on the obverse has also changed over the years, with never fewer than three, but on some known examples with as many as a dozen (the explanation as to the meaning of the stars in these early cases varies from chapter to chapter). Also, the date of the awarding of the honor is only seen on relatively later models (from the second quarter of the 19th century onward). Some people mistake the date that appears on the fob or key - December 5th, 1776 - as the date that a particular fob or key was awarded, when in fact that is merely the date of the founding of the society. Finally, in 1912, the key was standardized such that its size, golden appearance (some are plated), and engraving with the school's name, recipient's name, and date of the award all became standard, and the key lost much of its earlier archaic charm.


Activities and publications

The Phi Beta Kappa Society publishes The Key Reporter, a newsletter distributed quarterly to all contributing members and biannually to all other members, and The American Scholar, a quarterly subscription-based journal that accepts essays on literature, history, science, public affairs, and culture. The American Scholar is the literary quarterly of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, founded in 1932. ...


Phi Beta Kappa also funds a number of fellowships, visiting scholar programs, and academic awards.


Notable members

Elected as undergraduates

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Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Republican Senator from Indiana. ... Victor S. Navasky (b. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American writer. ... Reynolds Price Reynolds Price (born February 1, 1933, as Edward Reynolds Price) is a U.S. novelist, poet, dramatist, essayist and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Gloria Steinem at news conference, Womens Action Alliance, January 12, 1972 Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist icon, journalist and womens rights advocate. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator representing the state of North Carolina. ... Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) has been an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1988. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... Daniel Robert Graham (born November 9, 1936) is an American politician. ... Robert Nozick (November 16, 1938 – January 23, 2002) was an American philosopher and Pellegrino University Professor at Harvard University. ... Richard A. Posner Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939 in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ... Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is an American financier and businessman who served as the 70th United States Secretary of the Treasury during President Clintons administration. ... Lester Carl Thurow is a former dean of the MIT Sloan School of Management and author of numerous bestsellers on mainstream economics. ... Francis Thomas Fay Vincent, Jr. ... Patricia Schroeder (born July 30, 1940), American politician, was a twelve-term Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Colorado, serving from 1972 to 1996. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... Thomas John Brokaw (born February 6, 1940 in Webster, South Dakota) is a popular American television journalist, Previously working on regularly scheduled news documentaries for the NBC television network, and is the former NBC News anchorman and managing editor of the program NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw. ... Lynne Ann Vincent Cheney (born August 14, 1941) , is a novelist, conservative scholar, and former talk-show host who is the wife of Vice President Richard B. Cheney. ... Richard Epstein Richard A. Epstein, born in 1943, is currently the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. ... David Satcher David Satcher (b. ... John Edgar Wideman (born June 14, 1941 in Washington, DC) is an American writer. ... Robert James Woolsey, Jr. ... David Boies (born March 11, 1941) is a lawyer and a managing partner of Boies, Schiller & Flexner (BSF). ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American socialist organizer, professor who was associated with the Black Panther Party (BPP) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Terrence Terry Malick (born November 30, 1943 in Waco, Texas) is an Assyrian American film director. ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Philip Lader served as the US Ambassador to the Court of St. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Henry Merritt Hank Paulson, Jr. ... Laurie Anderson (born Laura Phillips Anderson, on June 5, 1947, in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) is an American experimental performance artist and musician. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... Edna Annie Proulx (pronounced ) (born August 22, 1935) is an American journalist and author. ... Frank Hoover Easterbrook (born 1948) has been a judge on the United States Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals since 1985. ... Louis Freeh was the fifteenth director of the FBI. He oversaw the agency for nearly 10 years during one of the most difficult periods of its history. ... A portait of Nadine Strossen Professor Nadine Strossen is president of the American Civil Liberties Union. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... Benazir Bhutto (Sindhi:بینظیر ڀھٽو ) (Urdu: بینظیر بھٹو) (b. ... John Ellis Jeb Bush (born February 11, 1953), a Republican, is the forty-third and current Governor of Florida. ... E.J. Dionne, Jr. ... Rita Frances Dove (born August 28, 1952 in Akron, Ohio, USA) is an African American United States poet and author. ... Glenn Close (born March 19, 1947) is a five-time Academy Award-nominated American film and stage actress. ... Christie Hefner (born November 8, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois) is the chairman and chief executive officer for Playboy Enterprises Inc. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Ben Shalom Bernanke[1] (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bÉ™r-nan-kÄ“ or ), is an American economist and current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve. ... Susan Margaret Collins (born December 7, 1952, in Caribou, Maine) is an American politician, the junior U.S. Senator from Maine and a Republican. // Collins is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of St. ... Harold Hongju Koh (born December 8, 1954, Boston, MA, United States) is a Korean-American lawyer, legal scholar, former U.S. State Department official, and current Dean of the Yale Law School (since July 1, 2004). ... Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton Gale Ann Norton (born March 11, 1954) is the current 48th United States Secretary of the Interior, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Robert B. Zoellick Robert Bruce Zoellick (IPA: ) (born July 25, 1953) is an American politician and (effective July 1, 2007) the eleventh president of the World Bank. ... Lawrence B. Lindsey was Director of the National Economic Council (2001-2002), and the Assistant to the President on Economic Policy for the U.S. President George W. Bush. ... This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Andrew Z. Fire Andrew Zachary Fire (born on April 27th 1959) is an American professor of pathology and of genetics at the Stanford University School of Medicine. ... Karen Parfitt Hughes (born December 27, 1956 in Paris, France) is a Republican U.S. political professional from the state of Texas. ... David Addington (b. ... Paula Franzese is an American law professor, specializing in real property and ethics. ... Jennifer Mulhern Granholm (born February 5, 1959) is a Canadian-born American politician and the current Governor of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Nicholas D. Kristof Nicholas Donabet Kristof (born April 27, 1959) is an American political scientist, author, and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist specializing in East Asia. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kateryna Yuschchenko with her husband Viktor Yushchenko Kateryna Mykhaylivna Yushchenko-Chumachenko is the current and second wife of Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko. ... Patrick J. Fitzgerald (born December 22, 1960) is an American attorney and the current United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois. ... Miguel Angel Estrada (born September 25, 1961) is an American lawyer who became embroiled in controversy following his 2001 nomination by President George W. Bush to the United States Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. ... Dinesh DSouza Dinesh DSouza (born April 25, 1961 in Bombay, India) is an author and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. ... David J. Morrow (Dec 18, 1960) is an American journalist and the current editor-in-chief of TheStreet. ... Daniel Pearl (October 10, 1963 – February 1, 2002) was an American journalist who was kidnapped and murdered in Karachi, Pakistan. ... Carol Queen is a notable American author, editor, and sexologist active in the sex-positive feminist movement. ... Jeffrey Preston Bezos (born January 12, 1964) is the founder, president, chief executive officer, and chairman of the board of Amazon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ashley Judd (born Ashley Tyler Ciminella on April 19, 1968) is an American actress. ... Joshua Redman (born February 1, 1969) is a prominent American Neo-bop jazz saxophonist who records for Nonesuch Records. ... Paul Adelstein (born April 29, 1969 in Chicago, Illinois) is an actor who plays agent Paul Kellerman in the hit TV series Prison Break. ... Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (born December 3, 1970) is an American lawyer and Democratic politician, currently serving as the sole member of the House of Representatives from South Dakota. ... Emily Bergl is an English-American actress. ... Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana)[1] is an American football quarterback for the Indianapolis Colts NFL franchise. ... Rivers Cuomo (born June 13, 1970), is the lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter of the rock band Weezer. ...

Honorary members

Angela Yvonne Davis (born January 26, 1944 in Birmingham, Alabama) is an American socialist organizer, professor who was associated with the Black Panther Party (BPP) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 - 2 August 1922) was a Scottish scientist, inventor and innovator. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... FDR redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American Jewish author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer. ... Carl Sandburg in 1955 Carl August Sandburg (January 6, 1878 – July 22, 1967) was an American poet, historian, novelist, balladeer, and folklorist. ... Portrait of William Tecumseh Sherman by Mathew Brady William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, and author. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... Eudora Welty (b. ...

References

  1. ^ The Phi Beta Kappa Society. Phi Beta Kappa. Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  2. ^ A Brief History of Phi Beta Kappa. About ΦΒΚ. Phi Beta Kappa. Retrieved on 2007-08-09.
  3. ^ Phi Beta Kappa Awards Chapter to Washington College. Washington College. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  4. ^ Students Initiated into New Phi Beta Kappa Chapter at Xavier University. Xavier University News. Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  5. ^ Thomson, Susan C.. "Phi Beta Kappa Is Not A Social Fraternity" (Abstract), The Washington Post, Jun 20, 2004, p. A 18. Retrieved on 2007-08-09. “Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest and most prestigious liberal arts college honor society, isn't ringing the same old bell with college students. 
  6. ^ a b John W. Churchill, "State of the Society Address", 41st Triennial Convention of Phi Beta Kappa, Atlanta, Georgia, October 2006.

The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... See Washington University (disambiguation) for institutions with similar names. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Xavier University is a private, Jesuit, co-educational Catholic university in the United States located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Phi Beta Kappa -- Penn State (1551 words)
Phi Beta Kappa keys, which are available in several sizes and styles, may be obtained by application to the Phi Beta Kappa Society or to the chapter secretary.
The Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa Professorship carries a stipend of $6,000 and is awarded annually to a philosopher on the faculty of an institution with a Phi Beta Kappa chapter.
Phi Beta Kappa was instrumental a generation ago in creating the National Faculty, now an Atlanta-based organization devoted to fostering the professional development of teachers at all levels of public education.
Phi Beta Kappa Society - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1451 words)
The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of "fostering and recognizing excellence" in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences.
While Phi Beta Kappa developed the distinctive characteristics of Greek-letter fraternities, it was left to other students to fill the natural human need for fellowship with kindred students by extension of fraternity to a social context.
For example, Alpha of Pennsylvania refers to the chapter at Dickinson College (1887); Beta of Pennsylvania at Lehigh University (1887); Gamma of Pennsylvania at Lafayette College (1890); and Delta of Pennsylvania at the University of Pennsylvania (1892).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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