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Encyclopedia > Phalanges of the foot
Bone: Phalanges of the foot
Plan of ossification of the foot.
Bones of the right foot. Plantar surface.
Latin ossa digitorum pedis, phalanges digitorum pedis
Gray's subject #65 275
Dorlands/Elsevier o_07/12598297

The phalanges of the foot correspond, in number and general arrangement, with those of the hand; there are two in the great toe, and three in each of the other toes. They differ from them, however, in their size, the bodies being much reduced in length, and, especially in the first row, laterally compressed. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (649x1184, 95 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Elseviers logo. ... The hands (med. ...

  • First Row: The body of each is compressed from side to side, convex above, concave below. The base is concave; and the head presents a trochlear surface for articulation with the second phalanx.
  • Second Row: The phalanges of the second row are remarkably small and short, but rather broader than those of the first row.

The ungual phalanges, in form, resemble those of the fingers; but they are smaller and are flattened from above downward; each presents a broad base for articulation with the corresponding bone of the second row, and an expanded distal extremity for the support of the nail and end of the toe.

Contents

Articulations

In the second, third, fourth, and fifth toes the phalanges of the first row articulate behind with the metatarsal bones, and in front with the second phalanges, which in their turn articulate with the first and third: the ungual phalanges articulate with the second. The metatarsus consists of the five long bones of the foot, which are numbered from the medial side (ossa metatarsalia I.-V.); each presents for examination a body and two extremities. ...


See also

The Phalanges of the hand are fourteen in number, three for each finger, and two for the thumb. ...

Additional images

External links

  • Diagram at shockfamily.net

This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
II. Osteology. 6d. 3. The Phalanges of the Foot. Gray, Henry. 1918. Anatomy of the Human Body. (559 words)
The phalanges of the foot correspond, in number and general arrangement, with those of the hand; there are two in the great toe, and three in each of the other toes.
The ungual phalanges, in form, resemble those of the fingers; but they are smaller and are flattened from above downward; each presents a broad base for articulation with the corresponding bone of the second row, and an expanded distal extremity for the support of the nail and end of the toe.
Ossification of the Bones of the Foot (Fig.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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