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Encyclopedia > Peyton Randolph

Peyton Randolph Peyton Randolph (1779-1828) Virginia politician. ...

Born September 1721
Williamsburg, Virginia
Term September 5, 1774-October 22, 1774 and May 10, 1775-October 22, 1775
Died October 22, 1775
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Peyton Randolph (c. 1721October 21, 1775) was the first President of the Continental Congress. He presided from September 5 to October 21, 1774, and then again for a few days in 1775 from May 10 to May 23. He was succeeded in office by Henry Middleton. Peyton Randolph (from life by John Wollaston) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... Year 1721 (MDCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... The President of the Continental Congress was the presiding officer of the Continental Congress. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Year 1775 (MDCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Middleton (1717 – June 13, 1784) of South Carolina was the second President of the Continental Congress, and thus the leader of what was to become the United States, from October 22, 1774 until Peyton Randolph was able to resume his duties briefly beginning on May 10, 1775. ...


Randolph was born in Virginia. His parents were Sir John Randolph and Susannah Beverley. He was also the grandson of William Randolph. He attended the College of William and Mary, and later studied law at Middle Temple at the Inns of Court in London, becoming a member of the bar in 1743. He then returned to Williamsburg and was appointed Attorney General of the Virginia colony the next year. This article is about the U.S. state. ... William Randolph (1650 - April 11, 1711) was a founding father, colonist and land owner who played an important role in Virginian history and politics. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Combined arms of the four Inns of Court The Inns of Court, in London, are the professional associations to one of which every English barrister (and those judges who were formerly barristers) must belong. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ...


He served several terms in the Virginia House of Burgesses, beginning in 1748. It was his dual roles as attorney general and as burgess that would lead to an extraordinary conflict of interest in 1751. Patrick Henry before the House of Burgesses in an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel The Virginia House of Burgesses formed, the first legislative body in colonial America. ... Year 1748 (MDCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 25 - For the last time, New Years Day is legally on March 25 in England and Wales. ...


The new governor, Robert Dinwiddie, had imposed a fee for the certification of land patents, which the House of Burgesses strongly objected to. The House selected Peyton Randolph to represent their cause to Crown authorities in London. In his role as attorney general, though, he was responsible for defending actions taken by the governor. Randolph left for London, over the objections of Governor Dinwiddie, and was replaced for a short time as attorney general. He was reinstated on his return at the behest of officials in London, who also recommended the Governor drop the new fee. Robert Dinwiddie, lieutenant governor of Virginia Michael Dinwiddie (1693 – July 27, 1770) was a British colonial administrator who served as lieutenant governor of colonial Virginia from 1751 to 1758, first under Governor Willem Anne van Keppel, 2nd Earl of Albemarle, and then, from July 1756 to January 1758, as deputy...


In 1765 Randolph found himself at odds with a freshman burgess, Patrick Henry, over the matter of a response to the Stamp Act. The House appointed Randolph to draft objections to the act, but his more conservative plan was trumped when Henry obtained passage of five of his seven Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions. This was accomplished at a meeting of the House in which most of the members were absent, and over which Randolph was presiding in the absence of the Speaker. Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. ... Patrick Henrys speech on the Virginia Resolves (an 1851 painting by Peter F. Rothermel) The Virginia Resolves were a series of resolutions passed by the Virginia General Assembly in response to the Stamp Act of 1765. ...


Randolph resigned as attorney general in 1766. As friction between Britain and the colonies progressed, he became more in favor of independence. In 1769 the House of Burgesses was dissolved by the Governor in response to its actions against the Townshend Act. Randolph had been Speaker at the time. Afterwards, he chaired meetings of a group of former House members at a Williamsburg tavern, which worked toward responses to the unwelcome tax measures imposed by the British government. 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Townshend Acts were passed in 1767 by the British Parliament, having been proposed by Charles Townshend as Chancellor of the Exchequer just before his death. ...


Randolph was selected to chair in both the First and Second Continental Congresses, in large part due to his reputation for leadership while in the House of Burgesses. He did not, however, live to see independence for the nation he led; Randolph died in Philadelphia, and was buried at Christ's Church. He was later re-interred at the College of William and Mary chapel. Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Family ties

His nephew, Edmund Randolph, became the first United States Attorney General. Randolph County, North Carolina, formed in 1779, and two US Navy ships called USS Randolph were named in his honor. His wife was the sister of Benjamin Harrison V. His first cousin once removed was President Thomas Jefferson. (Jefferson's daughter Martha Jefferson Randolph's husband Thomas Mann Randolph was a descendant of Peyton's uncle Richard Randolph and his wife Jane Bolling, a descendant of Pocahontas.) His first cousin twice removed was Supreme Court Justice John Marshall. His niece Lucy Grymes married Virginia Governor Thomas Nelson Jr; her first cousin once removed, also named Lucy Grymes, married Henry Lee II (who was in fact Peyton Randolph's first cousin once removed), and was the mother of Henry Lee, who was the father of Confederate General Robert Edward Lee-{also related to Confederate Generals Fitzhugh Lee; Edmund Jennings Lee; Nelson Pendelton Lee; Richard L. Page; US Admiral Samuel P. Lee; Confederate General John Pegram married Hetty Cary, a cousin to the Randolphs. Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Randolph County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have been named USS Randolph, after Peyton Randolph, a member and first president of the Continental Congress. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison (V) (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Martha Washington Jefferson Randolph (September 27, 1772 – October 10, 1836) , was the daughter of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, and his wife Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson. ... For other uses, see Pocahontas (disambiguation). ... In order to become a Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States, an individual must be nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... For other persons named John Marshall, see John Marshall (disambiguation). ... Thomas Nelson, Jr. ... Lee Family Coat of Arms Maj. ... Henry Lee (portrait by William Edward West) Lee Family Coat of Arms Henry Lee III, called Light Horse Harry, (January 29, 1756 – March 25, 1818) was a cavalry officer in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. ... For the author of Inherit the Wind and other works, see Robert Edwin Lee. ... Fitzhugh Lee in the Civil War Fitzhugh Lee (November 19, 1835 – April 18, 1905), nephew of Robert E. Lee, was a Confederate cavalry general in the American Civil War, Governor of Virginia, diplomat, and U.S. Army general in the Spanish-American War. ... Richard Lucian Page Richard Lucian Page (December 20, 1807 – August 9, 1901) was a U.S. Navy officer who joined the Confederate States Navy and later became a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... Samuel Phillips Lee, United States Navy Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee (13 February 1812 – 7 June 1897) was a Rear Admiral of the United States Navy. ... For the Confederate general with a similar name, see John Pegram (general). ... Cary may refer to: // Cary family Alice Cary Annie Louise Cary Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount Falkland Caitlin Cary Diana Serra Cary Diane Cary Elizabeth Cary Elizabeth Cabot Cary Frank T. Cary Glover H. Cary Henry Cary Henry Cary, 1st Viscount Falkland Howard Cary (1908-1991), founder of Applied Physics Corporation...


Further reading

  • Klos, Stanley L. (2004). President Who? Forgotten Founders. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Evisum, Inc., 261. ISBN 0-9752627-5-0. 
  • John Reardon; Peyton Randolph, 1721-1775: One Who Presided; 1981, Carolina University Press; ISBN 0-89089-201-6.

External links

Preceded by
(none) - British Secretary of State for the Colonies William Legge, 2nd Earl of Dartmouth
President of the First Continental Congress
September 5, 1774October 21, 1774
Succeeded by
Henry Middleton
Preceded by
Henry Middleton
(as President of the First Continental Congress)
President of the Second Continental Congress
May 10, 1775May 23, 1775
Succeeded by
John Hancock

  Results from FactBites:
 
Peyton Randolph (2062 words)
Peyton Randolph was appointed chairman of a committee to draft protests to the king, the House of Lords, and the House of Commons maintaining the colony's exclusive right of self-taxation.
Peyton Randolph was elected Speaker on November 6, 1766, succeeding the deceased Robinson and defeating Richard Henry Lee.
Peyton Randolph was in the chair again at the Second Virginia Convention in Richmond on March 23 when Patrick Henry rose and made his "Liberty or Death" speech in favor of the formation of a statewide militia.
Edmund Randolph - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (589 words)
Randolph was born at Tazewell Hall to the prominent colonial Randolph family in Williamsburg, Virginia, and he was educated in law at the College of William and Mary.
Upon the death of his uncle Peyton Randolph he went to Virginia to act as executor of the estate, and while there was elected as a representative to the state constitutional convention.
Randolph, however, refused to sign the final document, believing the form of government it would engender had insufficient checks and balances, and published an account of his objections in October 1787.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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