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Encyclopedia > Petersburg, Virginia
Petersburg, Virginia
Official seal of Petersburg, Virginia
Seal
Nickname: The Cockade City
Location in the State of Virginia
Coordinates: 37°12′46″N 77°24′1″W / 37.21278, -77.40028
Country United States
State Virginia
County Independent city
Founded December 17, 1748
Government
 - Mayor Annie M. Mickens
Area
 - City  23.2 sq mi (60.1 km²)
 - Land  22.9 sq mi (59.3 km²)
 - Water  0.3 sq mi (0.8 km²)
Elevation  134 ft (40 m)
Population (2004)
 - City 32,757
 - Density 697.3/sq mi (269.2/km²)
 - Metro 1,126,262
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: http://www.petersburg-va.org/

Petersburg is an independent city in Virginia, United States. The population was 33,740 at the 2000 census. It is in Tri-Cities area of the Richmond-Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Petersburg (along with Colonial Heights) with neighboring Dinwiddie County for statistical purposes. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Adapted from Wikipedias VA county maps by Seth Ilys. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states, which are... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... The Commonwealth of Virginia is divided into 95 counties and 39 independent cities, which are considered county-equivalents for census puposes. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April 24 - A congress assembles at Aix-la-Chapelle with the intent to conclude the struggle known as the War of Austrian Succession - at October 18 - The Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle is signed to end the war Adam Smith begins to deliver public lectures in Edinburgh Building of... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The or meter (see spelling differences) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Metropolitan area in Western Tokyo as seen from Tokyo Tower A metropolitan area is a large population center consisting of a large city and its adjacent zone of influence, or of several neighboring cities or towns and adjoining areas, with one or more large cities serving as its hub or... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The Tri-Cities of Virginia (also known as the Tri-City area or the Appomatox Basin) is an area in the Greater Richmond Region which includes the three independent cities of Petersburg, Colonial Heights, and Hopewell and portions of the adjoining counties of Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, and Prince George in south... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... In the United States, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) has produced a formal definition of metropolitan areas, which are organized around county boundaries. ... The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides a comprehensive statistical picture of the economy of the United States. ... Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent city Incorporated 1948 Government  - Mayor John T. Wood Area  - City  7. ... Dinwiddie County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ...

Contents

History

Founding and early history

At the time the English arrived in Virginia in the early 1600s, the site was occupied by a significant Powhatan settlement, shown on Captain John Smith's map as Appamatuck, and was the seat of a sub-tribe of Native Americans of the same name, governed by a "queen" who was affliated with Chief Powhatan and the Powhatan Confederacy. Chief Powhatan in a longhouse at Werowocomoco (detail of John Smith map, 1612) The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), or Powhatan Renape (literally, the Powhatan Human Beings), is the name of a Native American tribe, and also the name of a powerful confederacy of tribes that they dominated. ... John Smith (1580-1631) was an English soldier and sailor, now chiefly remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English colony in North America, and his brief association with the Native American princess Pocahontas. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... Chief Powhatan (detail of map published by John Smith (1612) Chief Powhatan ( 1547— 1618) , whose proper name was Wahunsenacawh or (in seventeenth century English spelling) Wahunsunacock, was the leader of the Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten), a powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in... The Powhatan (also spelled Powatan and Powhaten) were a very powerful tribe of Native Americans, speaking an Algonquian language, who lived in what is now Virginia at the time of the first European-Native encounters. ...


Petersburg grew from the former Fort Henry, established on the south bank of the Appomatox in 1645. The city developed rapidly, and the Virginia General Assembly formally organized it in 1784. The Battle of Petersburg in 1781 was a part of the British attempt to regain control of Virginia. // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the Commonwealth of Virginia, a U.S. state. ... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The Port of Petersburg became renowned as a commercial center for transporting and processing cotton, tobacco and metal, produced and shipped from the region. As travel technology developed, Petersburg became established as a railroad center, with links completed to Richmond to the north, Farmville and Lynchburg to the west, and Weldon, North Carolina to the south. The last major line was to the east, when the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad was completed in 1858. Cotton ready for harvest. ... This article is about the product manufactured from Tobacco plants (Nicotiana spp. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Weldon is a town located in Halifax County, North Carolina. ... Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad map, circa 1858-1870, issued by William Mahone, President The Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad was built between Norfolk and Petersburg, Virginia and was completed by 1858. ...


Paved streets began to appear in 1813, soon followed by a canal bypassing the Appomattox falls; railroad lines linking it to all points of the compass came next, gaslights were introduced in 1851, and a new municipal water system was installed by 1857. All these civic improvements helped attract and hold a substantial business community, based on manufacture of tobacco products, but also including cotton and flour mills and banking. Year 1813 (MDCCCXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Civil War

The courthouse of Petersburg in 1865

Petersburg's 1860 population was 18,266, half of whom were black, and nearly a third of them were free blacks. Petersburg had the highest percentage of free men and women in the slave holding states of the Confederacy and the Union. Ninety percent of the white half were native Virginians, whose devotion to the cause during the War of 1812 inspired the nickname "Cockade City" in honor of the rosette they wore on their caps. When the Civil War came in 1861, Petersburg's men again responded, and they provided the South several infantry companies and artillery units, as well as three troops of cavalry. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 604 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1016 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Petersburg, Virginia courthouse in 1865 source [1] This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 604 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1016 pixel, file size: 234 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Petersburg, Virginia courthouse in 1865 source [1] This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries... Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


In 1864, Petersburg came to be of importance in the American Civil War during the Overland Campaign of Union General Ulysses S. Grant. Because of the railroads, Petersburg was the lifeline to Richmond, the Capital of the Confederacy. After the Battle of Cold Harbor, Grant stayed east of Richmond and headed south to Petersburg. Grant decided to cut off the rail lines into Petersburg, and thus Richmond's supplies. On June 9, troops under William F. "Baldy" Smith, of the 9th Corps, attacked the Dimmock Line, a set of defensive breastworks originally constructed in 1861 and 1862 to protect Petersburg against the Army of the Potomac under General George McClellan during the Peninsula Campaign. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, opposing commanders in the Overland Campaign The Overland Campaign, also known as Grants Overland Campaign and the Wilderness Campaign, was a series of battles fought in Virginia during May and June 1864, in the American Civil War. ... Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 108,000 62,000 Casualties 13,000 2,500 The Battle of Cold Harbor, the final battle of Union Lt. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... Wiiliam F. Smith may refer to: William Farrar Smith -- Union Army General William French Smith -- U.S. Attorney General This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... IX Corps (Ninth Corps) was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War that distinguished itself in combat in multiple theaters: the Carolinas, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi. ... Earthworks can refer to: Civil engineering earthworks based on moving massive quantites of soil; The Earthworks audio equipment company; The novel Earthworks by Brian Aldiss; The earthworks style of art. ... Generals Burnside, Hancock, Couch, Ferro, Patrick, Wilcox, Cochrane, Buford and others. ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... McClellan and Johnston of the Peninsula Campaign The Peninsula Campaign (also known as the Peninsular Campaign) of the American Civil War was a major Union operation launched in southeastern Virginia from March through July 1862, the first large-scale offensive in the Eastern Theater. ...


The Confederate troops at this time numbered around 2,000. The lines could have easily been taken, but with the memory of Pearl Harbor still fresh, Generals Smith and Hancock were reticent to attack a fortified line. Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard, commanding the troops at this time, alerted Lee that he was facing the Army of the Potomac at Petersburg. Lee later arrived, and the 292-day Siege of Petersburg began. Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 - February 9, 1886) was born in Montgomery Square, Pennsylvania and named after the famous general Winfield Scott. ... Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (BO-rih-gahrd) (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant Robert E. Lee Strength 67,000 – 125,000 average of 52,000 Casualties 53,386 ~32,000 The Richmond-Petersburg Campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 15, 1864, to March...


On the Eastern Front, the trench lines were very close together. One soldier in the 48th Pennsylvania, a coal miner in his civilian life, remarked aloud "We could blow that battery into oblivion if we could dig a mine underneath it." Colonel Henry Pleasants, division commander, took this idea seriously and moved it up the chain of command. The plan was given the go ahead. On August 9, the mine was exploded. Due to poor Union leadership and the timely arrival of Confederate General William Mahone, the Union lost the Battle of the Crater, suffering over 4,000 casualties. This famous battle is portrayed in the motion picture Cold Mountain. Brig. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William Thomas Mahone (December 1, 1826 – October 8, 1895), of Southampton County, Virginia was a civil engineer, teacher, soldier, railroad executive, and a member of the Virginia General Assembly and U.S. Congress. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ambrose E. Burnside Robert E. Lee Strength IX Corps elements of the Army of Northern Virginia Casualties 5,300 total 1,032 total The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege... This article is about the film. ...


The Siege of Petersburg ended in early April 1865, and preceded Robert E. Lee's surrender and the end of the war. Confederate General Ambrose P. (A.P.) Hill died on the last day the Confederates occupied the Petersburg trenches. The extended network of fortified entrenchments around Petersburg established a precedent in warfare that would be magnified in Europe during World War I. Ambrose Powell Hill (November 9, 1825 _ April 2, 1865), was a Confederate States of America general in the American Civil War. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Postbellum history

The city was ringed with a series of fortifications during the years of "Reconstruction" following the war; many of these have been preserved in Pamplin Park. As reconstruction policies were instituted after slavery during the 1870s John Mercer Langston was elected to the United States Congress. Reconstruction was the attempt from 1865 to 1877 in U.S. history to resolve the issues of the American Civil War, when both the Confederacy and slavery were destroyed. ... John Mercer Langston John Mercer Langston (December 14, 1829–November 15, 1897) was born in Louisa County, Virginia. ...


In 1874 during Reconstruction, James M. Wilkerson, Sr. founded a business named the Wilkerson Undertaking Company, which is currently operating as the James M. Wilkerson Funeral Establishment, Inc. [1]. It is one of the oldest black-owned firms in the United States. Central State (psychiatric) Hospital and Fort Lee, housing the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps Center and School, are also located nearby. Fort Lee is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince George County, Virginia, United States. ... The Quartermaster Corps is a combat service support branch of the United States Army. ...


The Petersburg area is home to Virginia State University, founded in 1882 (in Ettrick), one of the first fully state-supported four-year institutions of higher learning for African-Americans. Virginia State University, located in Ettrick, Virginia (near Petersburg, in the Richmond area), was founded on March 6, 1882. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ...


Petersburg at present is an evolving small city, yet still suffers from the effects of the war and siege now more than 140 years in the past. The former downtown area, once vibrant near the north end of Sycamore Street, is now having a rebirth. Many restaurants, speciality shops, and up-scale apartments and condos are booming, with more underway. Recently, this area has been featured in Southern Living magazine, and also on HGTV's "What You Get For The Money". The Downtown area has also become a booming arts center, with both an area Arts League as well as a Performing Arts Center and restaurant, the Sycamore Rouge. The city also celebrates a "Friday of the Arts" on the second Friday of each month in which many locations feature local artwork and live music.


Wellotson Holdings, LLC, a small investment firm based in Fruit Heights, Utah has purchased many buildings in the area and has renovated several into stores, restaurants, and a large Antique Mall, called The Oak Antique Mall. Wellotson Holdings is currently renovating many other buildings in Old Towne for both housing and commercial development.


Location

Located along the eastern seaboard, approximately halfway between New York and Florida, Petersburg is at the juncture of Interstates 95 and 85, just 23 miles south of Virginia's state capital, Richmond. The city is one of 13 jurisdictions that comprise the Richmond-Petersburg Metropolitan Statistical Area. Petersburg is a part of the Tri-cities, Virginia regional economy known as the "Appomattox Basin" that includes the counties of Dinwiddie and Prince George, the southern part of Chesterfield County, and the cities of Hopewell and Colonial Heights. Categories: US geography stubs ... NY redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Richmond-Petersburg is a region located in a central part of the state of Virginia in the United States. ... The Tri-Cities of Virginia (also known as the Tri-City area or the Appomatox Basin) is an area in the Greater Richmond Region which includes the three independent cities of Petersburg, Colonial Heights, and Hopewell and portions of the adjoining counties of Chesterfield, Dinwiddie, and Prince George in south...


Industry and revitalization

Petersburg has a long history as an industrial center for Virginia. Though tobacco giant Brown & Williamson left the town, firms like Remmie Arnold Pen Co., Seward Trunk Co. and Titmus Optical are well known brand names associated with the town. Brown & Williamson is an American tobacco company, which produces cigarette brands. ... Founded in 1878 by Simon Seward, the Petersburg, Virginia-based Seward Trunk Co. ...


Since the departure of Brown & Williamson, Petersburg has invested heavily in historic preservation of architecture, as the city has a large inventory of 18th, 19th and 20th century structures in its historic neighborhoods. Groups like Historic Petersburg Foundation and Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities have worked to restore many of the city's buildings. Historic preservation, heritage management, or heritage conservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... Founded in 1889, the Richmond, Virginia-based Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities was the United States first statewide historic preservation group. ...


Geography

Petersburg is located at 37°12′46″N, 77°24′1″W (37.21295, -77.400417)GR1.


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 60.1 km² (23.2 mi²). 59.3 km² (22.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.8 km² (0.3 mi²) of it (1.29%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ...


Petersburg is located on the Appomattox River at the fall line, which marks the area where an upland region (continental bedrock) and a coastal plain (coastal alluvia) meet. The fall line is typically prominent where a river crosses it's rocky boundary as there are rapids or waterfalls. River boats could not travel any farther inland, making the location the head of navigation. The need of a port and abundant supply of water power causes settlements to develope where a river crosses the fall line. The Appomattox River at Matoaca, Virginia The Appomattox River is a tributary of the James River, approximately 137 mi (220 km), in central and eastern Virginia in the United States. ... The fall line has meanings in both geographical features and the sport of alpine skiing. ... Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... In geography, a coastal plain is an area of flat, low-lying land adjacent to a seacoast and separated from the interior by other features. ... Alluvium (from the Latin, alluvius, from alluere, to wash against) is soil or sediments deposited by a river or other running water. ... Head of navigation is a term used to describe the farthest point above the mouth of a river that can be navigated by ships. ...


The most prominent example of fall line settlement was the establishment of the cities along the eastern coast of the United States where the Appalachian Rise and the coastal plains meet. A rainy day in the Great Smoky Mountains, Western North Carolina The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of North American mountains mostly in the United States, and partly in Canada, forming a zone, from 100 to 300 miles wide, running from the island of Newfoundland some 1,500 miles...


Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 33,740 people, 13,799 households, and 8,513 families residing in the city. The population density was 569.4/km² (1,474.6/mi²). There were 15,955 housing units at an average density of 269.2/km² (697.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 18.52% White, 78.97% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.37% of the population. Following school integration in the 1960s, many white families moved to suburban Colonial Heights, Va. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 13,799 households out of which 27.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.1% were married couples living together, 26.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.98. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


In the city, the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 22.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 84.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.7 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $28,851, and the median income for a family was $33,955. Males had a median income of $27,859 versus $21,882 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,989. About 16.7% of families and 19.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.1% of those under age 18 and 15.8% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Famous residents of Petersburg

Joseph Cheshire Cotten (May 15, 1905–February 6, 1994) was an American stage and screen actor. ... White House portrait Nancy Davis Reagan (born July 6, 1921 (or, according to herself, 1923)) is the widow of President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ... Victoria Jackson Gray Adams (November 5, 1926 - August 12, 2006) was a pioneering civil rights activist from Hattiesburg, Mississippi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Fannie Lou Hamer (born Fannie Lou Townsend on October 6, 1917 – March 14, 1977) was an American voting rights activist and civil rights leader. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Mark Andre West (born November 5, 1960 in Petersburg, Virginia) is a former professional basketball player. ... Mickey Smith is a fictional character in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, played by Noel Clarke. ... City Houston, Texas Team colors Deep Steel Blue, Battle Red, and Liberty White Head Coach Gary Kubiak Owner Robert C. McNair General manager Rick Smith Mascot Toro League/Conference affiliations National Football League (2002–present) American Football Conference (2002-present) AFC South (2002-present) Team history Houston Texans (2002–present... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Ricky Hunley (born November 11, 1961 in Petersburg, Virginia) has been the running backs coach for the NFLs Cincinnati Bengals since 2003. ... Joseph Jenkins Roberts (March 15, 1809 â€“ February 24, 1876) was the first President of Liberia (1848–1856, 1872–1876). ... Vernon Johns (April 22, 1892 - June 11, 1965) was an American minister, and inspirational civil rights leader. ... Forrest Gump is the eponymous protagonist of a heavily satirical novel by Winston Groom, and of a 1994 Paramount Pictures film based on the novel. ... Glory is a 1989 drama based on the history of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Regiment during the American Civil War. ... Stonewall W. Jackson (February 27, 1961) is an African-American character actor. ... Wyatt Tee Walker (born August 16, 1929) is a United States black civil rights leader. ... The Apollo Theater on 125th Street; the Hotel Theresa is visible in the background. ... Photo of the entire cast of The Cosby Show. ... Blair Underwood (born August 25, 1964, in Tacoma, Washington) is an American television and film actor. ... Dee Dee Ramone, 1979 Dee Dee Ramone (Douglas Glenn Colvin) (September 18, 1952 - June 5, 2002) was an American songwriter and bassist, best remembered as a founding member of punk rock band the Ramones. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tyra Bolling is an R&B singer for an independent label, GG&L music, from Virginia. ...

See also

Petersburg High School is located in Petersburg, Virginia. ... Parking Yes; free Baggage check Yes Other information Accessible Code PTB Traffic Passengers (2006) 18,296 5% The Petersburg (Amtrak station) is located at 3516 South Street Ettrick Station in Petersburg, Virginia. ...

External links

  • Petersburg People's News Community Web-blog

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Petersburg, Virginia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1245 words)
Petersburg is located on the Appomattox River at the fall line, which marks the area where an upland region (continental bedrock) and a coastal plain (coastal alluvia) meet.
Petersburg grew from the former Fort Henry, established on the south bank in 1645.
Petersburg is a part of the Tri-cities, Virginia regional economy known as the "Appomattox Basin" that includes the counties of Dinwiddie and Prince George, the southern part of Chesterfield County, and the cities of Hopewell and Colonial Heights.
Petersburg, Virginia - definition of Petersburg, Virginia in Encyclopedia (921 words)
It is located in the Richmond-Petersburg region and is a portion of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).
During the American Civil War, Union General Ulysses S. Grant came in pursuit to destroy the Petersburg Transportation System, primarily the railroads which were key to the support of Richmond, Capital of the Confederacy.
Petersburg is the center of the Appomattox Basin regional economy that includes the counties of Dinwiddie and Prince George, the southern part of Chesterfield County, and the cities of Hopewell and Colonial Heights.
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