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Encyclopedia > Peterhouse, Cambridge
Colleges of the University of Cambridge

Peterhouse This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...

Peterhouse heraldic shield
       
College name Peterhouse
Named after Saint Peter
Established 1284
Previously named The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely
Saint Peter’s College
Location Trumpington Street
Admittance Men and women
Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn
Undergraduates 284
Graduates 130
Sister college Merton College, Oxford
Official website
Boat Club website

Peterhouse is the oldest college in the University of Cambridge. It was founded in 1284 by Hugo de Balsham, Bishop of Ely. Peterhouse has 253 undergraduates, 125 graduate students and 45 fellows, making it the smallest College in Cambridge, except for the specialized colleges that admit only women, graduates, or mature (over 21 years of age) students, some of which are smaller because of their specialized membership. The modern name of the college does not include the word "college", but rather is denoted solely by "Peterhouse". However, in official University of Cambridge documents (such as documents relating to the annual conferral of degrees) the College is referred to using its formal title, "The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely, Saint Peter’s College."[citation needed] Image File history File links Peterhouse_shield. ... “St Peter” redirects here. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... David Clive Wilson, Baron Wilson of Tillyorn, KT, GCMG (born 14 February 1935) was a British administrator, diplomat and Sinologist. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... and of the Merton College College name The House of Scholars of Merton Named after Walter de Merton Established 1264 Sister college Peterhouse, Cambridge Warden Prof. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Hugo (or Hugh) de Balsham (died 1286) was an English bishop. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... These are colleges within the University of Cambridge. ...

Contents

History

The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court can be seen.
The chapel cloisters, through which Old Court can be seen.

The foundation of Peterhouse dates to 1280, when Hugo de Balsham, the Bishop of Ely, planned to start a college on land that is now part of St John’s College. In 1284, he transferred to the present site with the purchase of two houses to accommodate a Master and fourteen “worthy but impoverished Fellows”, and Peterhouse was founded. A hall was built two years later; this is the oldest college building in Cambridge. Balsham died in 1286, bequeathing a sum of money that was used to buy further land. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 323 KB) Summary Chapel cloisters of Peterhouse, Cambridge, through which Old Court can be seen. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 323 KB) Summary Chapel cloisters of Peterhouse, Cambridge, through which Old Court can be seen. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Arms of the Bishop of Ely The Bishop of Ely is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Ely in the Province of Canterbury. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... // Events War and politics King Charles II of Naples is captured in a naval battle off Naples by Roger of Lauria, admiral to King Peter III of Aragon. ... Events Margaret I of Scotland became queen of Scotland, end of Canmore dynasty. ...


In the late sixteenth century, under the Mastership of Andrew Perne, the College was known as a centre for Arminianism, while master John Cosin promoted a Laudian version of religious observance in the 1630s. Arminianism is a school of soteriological thought in Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacob Hermann, who was best known by the Latin form of his name, Jacobus Arminius. ...


In the twentieth century, Peterhouse has had a reputation for excellence in both science and history. Notable history Fellows have included Adolphus William Ward, Harold Temperley, Herbert Butterfield, Hugh Trevor-Roper, Maurice Cowling and Niall Ferguson - see also Peterhouse school of history. Notable science Fellows have included Aaron Klug, Max Perutz and John Meurig Thomas. Adolphus William Ward (December 2, 1837 _ 1924), English historian and man of letters, was born at Hampstead, London, and was educated in Germany and at the university of Cambridge. ... Harold William Vezeille Temperley (20 April 1879-11 July 1939) was a British historian, Professor of Modern History at the University of Cambridge from 1931, and Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Herbert Butterfield (October 7, 1900-July 20, 1979) was a British historian and philosopher of history (see philosophy of history) who is remembered chiefly for a slim volume entitled The Whig Interpretation of History 1931. ... Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 – January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of Early Modern Britain and Nazi Germany. ... Maurice John Cowling (September 6, 1926 – August 24, 2005) was a British historian and a Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Niall Ferguson Niall Ferguson (b. ... The Peterhouse school of history was named after the Cambridge college of the same name where the history taught concentrated on high politics. That is, the study of fifty or sixty politicians in conscious tension with one another, in the words of Maurice Cowling, the most prominent member of the... Sir Aaron Klug, OM, FRS (born 11 August 1926 in Zelvas, Lithuania) is a Lithuanian-born British chemist and biophysicist, and winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes. ... Max Ferdinand Perutz, OM (May 19, 1914 – February 6, 2002) was an Austrian-British molecular biologist. ... Sir John Meurig Thomas is a leading British chemist, primarily known for his work on heterogeneous catalysis. ...


In the 1980s Peterhouse acquired an association with Conservative, Thatcherite politics. Maurice Cowling and Roger Scruton were both influential Fellows of the College and are sometimes described as key figures in the so-called “Peterhouse right” – an intellectual movement linked to Margaret Thatcher. Michael Portillo and Michael Howard both studied at Peterhouse. This tradition of intellectual political thought has been upheld by the recent establishment of the Peterhouse Politics Society. The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Right Honourable Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925) is a British politician and the first woman Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, a position she held from 1979 to 1990. ... Maurice John Cowling (September 6, 1926 – August 24, 2005) was a British historian and a Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Roger Vernon Scruton (born 27 February 1944) is a British philosopher. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and to date only woman to hold either post. ... Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is an English journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative party politician and Cabinet Minister. ... The Rt Hon. ...


Student Life

The college has an active Junior Combination Room (JCR) and was one of the few student bodies in Cambridge successful in keeping rents low during a series of rent strikes in 2000. Peterhouse JCR’s official title is the Sexcentenary Club, often abbreviated to the "Sex Club".[1] The term Junior Common Room is used in the University of Cambridge, the University of Oxford and the University of Durham to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent college of the university, as well as to a physical room set aside for... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a...


Buildings and grounds

Chapel

Interior of the chapel
Interior of the chapel

Viewed from the main entrance to Peterhouse on Trumpington Street, the altar end of the chapel is the most immediately visible building. The chapel was built in 1628 when the Master of the time Matthew Wren (Christopher Wren’s uncle) demolished the College’s original hostels. The chapel’s style reflects the contemporary religious trend towards Arminianism The Laudian Gothic style of the chapel mixes Renaissance details but incorporated them into a traditional Gothic building. The chapel’s Renaissance architecture contains a Pieta altarpiece and a striking ceiling of golden suns. The original stained glass was destroyed by Parliamentarian forces in 1643, with only the east window’s crucifixion scene (based on RubensLe Coup de Lance) surviving. The current side windows are by Max Ainmuller, and were added in 1855. The cloisters on each side of the chapel date from the seventeenth cenrury. However, their design was classicised in 1709, while an ornamental porch was removed in 1755. The music manuscripts from the early years of the chapel survive, and are one of the most important collections of Tudor and Jacobean church music. The restoration of the 1763 Snetzler organ in the chapel was by Noel Mander. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 365 KB) Summary Chapel of Peterhouse, Cambridge, interior. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 365 KB) Summary Chapel of Peterhouse, Cambridge, interior. ... 1628 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Matthew Wren Matthew Wren (December 3, 1585–April 24, 1667) was an influential English clergyman and scholar. ... Sir Christopher Wren, (20 October 1632–25 February 1723) was a 17th century English designer, astronomer, geometrician, and the greatest English architect of his time. ... Arminianism is a school of soteriological thought in Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacob Hermann, who was best known by the Latin form of his name, Jacobus Arminius. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... This article is about a form of art. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... // Events January 21 - Abel Tasman discovers Tonga February 6 - Abel Tasman discovers the Fiji islands. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 12 - Two-month freezing period begins in France - The coast of the Atlantic and Seine River freeze, crops fail and at least 24. ... 1755 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Old Court

Old Court, facing the chapel
Old Court, facing the chapel

Old Court lies beyond the chapel cloisters. To the south of the court is the dining hall, the only College building that survives from the thirteenth century. It was re-mediaevalised in 1870 with fine panelling, an impressive oriel window, and a new timber roof by the architect George Gilbert Scott. The stained glass, with pieces by William Morris, Ford Madox Brown and Edward Burne-Jones, is a fine example of Pre-Raphaelite glass. The sixteenth-century fireplace now contains tiles, also by Morris. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 401 KB) Summary Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1632x1232, 401 KB) Summary Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Oriel windows are a form of bay window commonly found in Gothic revival architecture, which jut out from the main wall of the building but do not reach to the ground. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... This page is about William Morris, the writer, designer and socialist. ... The Last of England, 1855 Ford Madox Brown (April 16, 1821 – October 6, 1893) was an English painter of moral and historical subjects, notable for his distinctively graphic and often Hogarthian version of the Pre-Raphaelite style. ... Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ...


The north and west sides of Old Court were added in the fifteenth century, and classicised three centuries later. The chapel makes up the fourth, east side to the court. Rooms in Old Court are occupied by a mixture of fellows and undergraduates. The west and north sides of the court also house Peterhouse’s JCR, and the student bar. The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a...


Gisborne Court


Gisborne Court is accessible through an archway leading from the west side of Old Court. It was built in 1825. Its cost was met with part of a benefaction of 1817 from the Rev. Francis Gisborne, a former Fellow. When the gift was announced to the Governing Body its size, £20,000, was so great that the Fellows took it at first as a practical joke. The court is built in white brick with stone dressings in a simple Tudor Gothic style from the designs of William Mclntosh Brookes. Only three sides to the court were built. The College is currently considering plans to build a fourth side in a similar style. Rooms in Gisborne Court are mainly occupied by undergraduates. Many previously housed distinguished alumni, including Lord Kelvin in I staircase. Year 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Fen Court and the Birdwood Building


Beyond Gisborne Court is Fen Court, a twentieth century building partially on stilts. Fen Court was built between 1939 and 1941 from designs by H. C. Hughes and his partner Peter Bicknell.[2] It was amongst the earliest buildings in Cambridge designed in the style of the Modern Movement pioneered by Walter Gropius at the Bauhaus. The carved panel by Anthony Foster over the entrance doorway evokes the mood in Britain as the building was completed. It bears the inscription DE PROFUNDIS CLAMAVI MCMXL (“out of the depths have I cried out 1940″), the first words of Psalm 130, one of the Penitential Psalms, and a depiction of St Peter saved in the midst of the sea. Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... For the British gothic rock band, see Bauhaus (band). ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... 24. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ...


The adjacent bath-house, known as the Birdwood Building, that makes up the western side of Gisborne Court was also designed by Hughes and Bicknell and was built between 1932 and 1934.[3] It is now used as a gym. Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Deer Park

Exterior of the Hall
Exterior of the Hall

The grounds to the south of Gisborne Court have been known as the Deer Park since deer were brought there in the nineteenth century. During that period it achieved fame as the smallest deer park in England. After the First World War the deer sickened and passed their illness onto stock imported from the Duke of Portland’s estate at Welbeck Abbey in an attempt to improve the situation. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 317 KB) Summary Exterior view of the Hall, Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1232x1632, 317 KB) Summary Exterior view of the Hall, Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Duke of Portland is a peerage title created in 1716 for Henry Bentinck, who was already Earl of Portland. ... // Welbeck Abbey, head abbey of the Premonstratensian order in England, and principal residence of the Dukes of Portland. ...


A popular College rumour that the deer in the Deer Park were eaten as a result of rationing during the Second World War is apocryphal. A variation on this urban legend has it that the Fellows ate the deer during the recession of the 1970s, to cut corners on formal hall bills. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The William Stone building


The William Stone building lies to the south of the Deer Park and was funded by a bequest from William Stone (1857-1958), a former scholar of the college. Erected in 1963, it is an eight-storey brick tower which was much admired and photographed in the 1960s and 1970s by architectural students, especially from Japan. It houses a mixture of Fellows and undergraduates. Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


The Burroughs building


The Burroughs building is situated at the front of the college, parallel to the Chapel. It is named after its architect, Sir James Burroughs, the Master of Caius, and was built in 1736. It is one of several Cambridge neo-Palladian buildings designed by Burroughs. Others include the remodelling of the Hall and Old Court at Trinity Hall and the chapel at Clare College. Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... Events January 26 - Stanislaus I of Poland abdicates his throne. ... A villa with a superimposed portico, from Book IV of Palladios I Quattro Libri dellArchitettura, in a modestly priced English translation published in London, 1736. ... College name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1350 Location Trinity Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... Full name Clare College Motto _ Named after Elizabeth de Clare Previous names University Hall (1326), Clare Hall (1338), Clare College (1856) Established 1326 Sister College Oriel College St Hughs College Master Prof. ...


The Master’s Lodge


The Master’s Lodge is situated across Trumpington Street from the College, and was bequeathed to the College in 1727 by a Fellow, Dr Charles Beaumont, son of a former Master, Joseph Beaumont. It is built in red brick in the Queen Anne style. Events 1727 to 1800 - Lt. ... An American Queen Anne style home in Lebanon, Illinois. ...


The Hostel


The Hostel is situated next to the Master’s Lodge. It was built in a neo-Georgian style in 1926 from designs by Thomas Henry Lyon. The Hostel was intended to be part of a larger complex but only one wing was built. It presently houses undergraduates and some fellows. During the World War II the London School of Economics was housed in The Hostel and nearby buildings, at the invitation of the Master and Fellows.[4] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ...


Arms

The College has, during its history, used five different coats of arms. The one currently in use has two legitimate blazons. The first form is the original grant by Robert Cooke, Clarenceux King of Arms, in 1575: In 1916 Robert Cooke and Albert Vandeveer demonstrated the role of heredity in the origins of allergy. ... Clarenceux King of Arms is an officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. ...

Or four pallets Gules within a border of the last charged with eight ducal coronets of the first.

The College did, however, habitually use a version with three pallets and this was allowed at the Herald's Visitation of Cambridgeshire in 1684. The latter version (with three pallets) was officially adopted by the Governing Body in 1935. The construction of the arms is that of the founder, Hugo de Balsham, surrounded by the crowns of the See of Ely.[5] Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... The Diocese of Ely is a Church of England diocese in the Province of Canterbury. ...


Ghost

In 1997 and 1998, Peterhouse was the subject of media interest in the UK after several members of kitchen staff claimed to have seen a ghost in the College’s Combination Room.[6][7] The ghost was said to be that of a former Bursar, Francis Dawes, who is now buried in the churchyard of Little St Mary’s, immediately to the north of the College. Francis Dawes had hanged himself with a bell rope in 1789, following irregularities over the election of Francis Barnes, a highly unpopular master. After the ghost was publicised in a series of newspaper articles, the College was rumoured to have conducted an exorcism. This would have been the college’s third exorcism; there are suggestions that the college conducted an exorcism in the 18th century, to banish a poltergeist. Also, a former Dean carried out a ceremony because of the appearance of a dark presence in a corner of the old courtyard overlooking the graveyard. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Dining Societies

Peterhouse is home to many oddly named dining societies, such as the Strafford Club, the Cocoa Tree Club, and the Adonians. One dining society, the Authenticators, was named in (dis)honour of a previous Master of the college, Lord Dacre of Glanton, who had made the mistake of authenticating the forged Hitler Diaries in the Sunday Times (see the obituary of Maurice Cowling in the Daily Telegraph which mentions his sponsorship of the first dinner [1]). Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 - January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of early modern Britain and Nazi Germany, who became infamous for authenticating the Hitler Diaries, which were later proved to be a hoax. ...


Peterhouse Grace

Benedic nos Domine, et dona Tua, quae de Tua largitate sumus sumpturi, et concede, ut illis salubriter nutriti, Tibi debitum obsequium praestare valeamus, per Christum Dominum nostrum, Amen. Deus est caritas, et qui manet in caritate in Deo manet, et Deus in eo: sit Deus in nobis, et nos maneamus in ipso. Amen.

Bless us, O Lord, and your gifts, which of your bounty we are about to receive, and grant that, fed wholesomely upon them, we may be able to offer due service to you, through Christ our Lord, Amen. God is love, and he who dwells in love dwells in God, and God in him. May God be in us, and we in him. Amen.

Famous Petreans

See also Category:Alumni of Peterhouse, Cambridge

Name Birth Death Career
Tom Askwith 1911 2001 Permanent Secretary
Blue and Olympic oarsman
Richard Baker 1925 Newsreader
Charles Babbage 1791 1871 His analytical engine anticipated the modern computer
Augustus Theodore Bartholomew 1882 1933 Cambridge librarian
Steph Cook 1972 Gold medal Pentathlon Olympian
Richard Crashaw Poet
Richard Eyre 1943 Film and theatre director
Augustus Henry Fitzroy, 3rd Duke of Grafton 1735 1811 British Prime Minister
Colin Charles Greenwood 1969 Bass player of Radiohead
Syed Mohammed Hadi 1899 1971 Olympic athlete
Erich Heller 1911 1990 British essayist
Sir Christopher Heydon 1561 1623 English soldier and writer on astrology
Alexander Ashley Hill Historian
Michael Howard 1941 Former leader of the Conservative Party
James Mason 1909 1984 Actor
James Clerk Maxwell 1831 1879 Physicist
Dan Mazer 1971 Comic writer
Chris Mead 1940 2003 Ornithologist
Sam Mendes 1965 Flm and stage director/producer
Christopher Meyer 1944 Former British ambassador to the USA
David Mitchell 1974 Comedian
Michael Portillo 1953 Former Conservative MP
Ed Smith 1977 Cricketer and author
Anthony St Leger 1732 1786 Soldier, politician, Governor of Saint Lucia
Founder of the St. Leger Stakes
Frank Whittle 1907 1996 Devoped jet propulsion
Peregrine Worsthorne 1923 Journalist

Thomas Garrett Askwith (born May 24, 1911, died July 16, 2001), was Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of African Affairs, and a double Olympian. ... Richard Baker is a British broadcaster, best known as an anchor man for the BBC news. ... Babbage redirects here. ... The analytical engine, an important step in the history of computers, was the design of a mechanical general-purpose computer by the British professor of mathematics Charles Babbage. ... A. T. (Theo) Bartholomew (1882 - 1933) was a bibliographer and a librarian at Cambridge University for over twenty-five years. ... Stephanie Cook was born in Irvine Scotland on 3rd January 1972. ... Richard Crashaw (c. ... Sir Richard Eyre, (born 28 March 1943), is a British film and theatre director. ... Augustus Henry FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton (October 1, 1735 - March 14, 1811), was a British politician of the Georgian era. ... Colin Greenwood (born Colin Charles Greenwood, 26 June 1969, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England), also known as Coz, is a member of English rock band Radiohead. ... Radiohead are an English rock band. ... Syed Mohammed Hadis obituary in the Indian Express newspaper Syed Mohammed (S.M.) Hadi (b. ... Erich Heller (March 27, 1911 — November 5, 1990); British essayist; one of the most important twentieth-century thinkers on the human condition. ... Sir Christopher Heydon, (born in Surrey, England, 14 August 1561, died 1623), was an English soldier and writer on astrology. ... The Rt Hon. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... James Neville Mason (May 15, 1909 – July 27, 1984) was a three-time Academy Award nominated English actor who attained stardom in both British and American films. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. His most significant achievement was aggregating a set of equations in electricity, magnetism and inductance — eponymously named Maxwells equations — including an important modification (extension) of the Ampères... Dan Mazer (born 1971) is a British Comedian, screen-writer, TV and film producer. ... Christopher John (Chris) Mead (b. ... Sam Mendes Samuel Alexander Mendes, CBE (born August 1, 1965) is an English stage and film director born in Reading, Berkshire, England. ... Sir Christophers memoirs Sir Christopher Meyer, KCMG (born 22 February 1944) is a former British Ambassador to the United States (1997–2003), and the current chair of the Press Complaints Commission (since 2003). ... David Mitchell (born 14 July 1974 in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England[1]) is an English comedian, actor and writer. ... Michael Denzil Xavier Portillo (born 26 May 1953) is an English journalist, broadcaster, and former Conservative party politician and Cabinet Minister. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Edward Thomas Smith (born 19 July 1977, Pembury, Kent, UK) is an English cricketer who played three home Test matches against South Africa in 2003. ... Major General Anthony St Leger (1731/32 - 19th April 1786) was a successful soldier, a Member of Parliament for Grimsby, and the founder of the St. ... The St. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of the Flight Propulsion Research Laboratory (Now known as the NASA Glenn Research Center), USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE, FRS, Hon FRAeS (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was an English Royal Air Force officer and is seen as the... Sir Peregrine Gerard Worsthorne (born December 22, 1923) is a British Conservative journalist, writer and broadcaster. ...

Famous Fellows of Peterhouse

See also Category:Fellows of Peterhouse, Cambridge fellows may refer to: the plural of Fellow Fellows, California This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Name Birth Death Career
Kingsley Amis 1922 1995 Novelist
Herbert Butterfield 1900 1979 Historian
Henry Cavendish 1731 1810 Scientist
Christopher Cockerell 1910 1999 Inventor of the hovercraft
Maurice Cowling 1926 2005 Historian
Richard Crashaw 1613 1649 Poet
James Dewar 1842 1923 Scientist
Niall Ferguson 1964 Historian
Thomas Gray 1716 1771 Poet
Lord Kelvin 1824 1907 Physicist
Aaron Klug 1926 Nobel Prize Winner
Archer Martin 1910 2002 Nobel Prize for developing partition chromatography
Edward Norman 1938 Theologian
Andrew Perne 1519 1589 Dean of Ely
Max Perutz 1914 2002 Nobel Prize for chemistry
Roger Scruton 1944 Philosopher
Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton 1914 2003 Historian
John Whitgift 1530 1604 Archbishop

Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Herbert Butterfield (October 7, 1900-July 20, 1979) was a British historian and philosopher of history (see philosophy of history) who is remembered chiefly for a slim volume entitled The Whig Interpretation of History 1931. ... For other persons named Henry Cavendish, see Henry Cavendish (disambiguation). ... Sir Christopher Sydney Cockerell (June 4, 1910 – June 1, 1999) was an English engineer, inventor of the hovercraft. ... A Hovercraft, or Air-Cushion Vehicle (ACV), is an amphibious vehicle or craft, designed to travel over any sufficiently smooth surface - land or water - supported by a cushion of slowly moving, low-pressure air, ejected downwards against the surface close below it. ... Maurice John Cowling (September 6, 1926 – August 24, 2005) was a British historian and a Fellow of Peterhouse, Cambridge. ... Richard Crashaw (c. ... For other persons named James Dewar, see James Dewar (disambiguation). ... Niall Ferguson Niall Ferguson (b. ... For other uses, see Thomas Gray (disambiguation). ... William Thomson, Archbishop of York, has the same name as this man. ... Sir Aaron Klug, OM, FRS (born 11 August 1926 in Zelvas, Lithuania) is a Lithuanian-born British chemist and biophysicist, and winner of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes. ... Archer John Porter Martin was a British chemist and Nobel Prize winner. ... For the Second Person album, see Chromatography (album). ... Dr. Edward Norman was Canon Chancellor of York Minster and is an ecclesiastical historian. ... Andrew Perne (c. ... Max Ferdinand Perutz, OM (May 19, 1914 – February 6, 2002) was an Austrian-British molecular biologist. ... Roger Vernon Scruton (born 27 February 1944) is a British philosopher. ... Hugh Redwald Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre of Glanton (January 15, 1914 - January 26, 2003) was a notable historian of early modern Britain and Nazi Germany. ... John Whitgift (c. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.srcf.ucam.org/pet-jcr/jcr.php
  2. ^ Peterhouse Annual Record 2002/2003
  3. ^ Peterhouse Annual Record 2002/2003
  4. ^ http://www.pet.cam.ac.uk/images/display.html?image=album/hostel/hostel_03.jpg
  5. ^ Peterhouse Annual Record 1999/2000
  6. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/40871.stm
  7. ^ http://www.iol.ie/~afifi/BICNews/Fun/fun8.htm

External links

Coordinates: 52°12′03″N 0°07′06″E / 52.2009, 0.1184 (Peterhouse) Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Peterhouse, Cambridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1694 words)
Peterhouse is the oldest college in the University of Cambridge.
In 1998 Peterhouse was the subject of media interest in the UK after several members of kitchen staff claimed to have seen a ghost in the College's Combination Room.
Peterhouse is home to many oddly-named dining societies, such as the Strafford Club and the Cocoa Tree Club.
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