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Encyclopedia > Peter Milliken
Hon. Peter Andrew Stewart Milliken
Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons
Incumbent
Riding Kingston and the Islands
In office since 1988
Preceded by Flora MacDonald
Born November 12, 1946 (1946-11-12) (age 60)
Kingston, Ontario
Residence Kingston
Political party

Liberal The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Flora MacDonald (1722 – March 5, 1790), Jacobite heroine, was the daughter of Ranald MacDonald of Milton in the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, and his wife Marion, the daughter of Angus MacDonald. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...

Profession(s) Lawyer
Religion United Church of Canada

Peter Andrew Stewart Milliken, MP, BA , MA , LL.B (born November 12, 1946) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. He has been a member of the Canadian House of Commons since 1988, and has served as Speaker of the House since 2001. Milliken represents the Ontario riding of Kingston and the Islands as a member of the Liberal Party. As Speaker of the House of Commons, he is entitled to be styled The Honourable while in office. English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ... 38th Parliament Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of May 17, 2005. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman - Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 106 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area Ranked 4th... In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county, in Australia analogous. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ...


Milliken is the cousin of John Matheson, a former Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) best known for his prominent role in adopting the red maple leaf as the Flag of Canada.[1] The Honourable John Ross Matheson, OC , CD , QC , LL.M. , LL.D. (born November 14, 1917) is a former Canadian politician who helped develop both the maple leaf flag and the Order of Canada. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Maple leaves in fall For other meanings, see maple leaf (disambiguation). ... The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and lUnifolié (French for the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. ...

Contents

Early life and career

Milliken was born in Kingston, Ontario, a descendant of United Empire Loyalists who left the new United States of America after the American Revolution. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Economics from Queen's University (1968), a Bachelor of Arts (1970) and Master of Arts (1978) in Jurisdiction from Oxford University in England, and a Bachelor of Laws (1971) degree from Dalhousie University.[2] He was active in student politics, and served a year as speaker of the student government's assembly at Queen's. In 1967-68, he worked as a special assistant to federal cabinet minister George J. McIlraith.[3] Murney Tower, Kingston The Fort Henry Guard performing an historical demonstration The Prince George Hotel. ... United Empire Loyalists is the name given to individuals who are descendants of British North American loyalists who, during the American War of Independence, left the 13 rebellious American colonies for the future Canada: the two British colonies of Quebec (including the Eastern Townships and modern-day Ontario) and Nova... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... Queens University, generally referred to simply as Queens, is a coeducational, non-sectarian, public university located in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in most common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... Dalhousie University is a university located on the Halifax Peninsula in the Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Alternate meanings in cabinet (disambiguation) A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... The Honourable George James McIlraith, PC (July 29, 1908 - August 19, 1992) was a lawyer and Canadian parliamentarian. ...


Called to the Ontario Bar in 1973, Milliken was a partner in a prestigious Kingston law firm before entering political life. He also lectured on a part-time basis at the Queen's University School of Business from 1973 to 1981, became a governor of the Kingston General Hospital in 1977, and has been a trustee with the Chalmers United Church.[4] A fan of classical music, he has sung with the Pro Arte Singers and the Chalmers United Church Choir as well as serving on the board of the Kingston Symphony Orchestra.[5] In 2001, he was awarded an honorary Bachelor of Laws degree from the State University of New York at Potsdam.[6] He is an honorary member of the Royal Military College of Canada. 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ... The United Church of Canada (French: lÉglise Unie du Canada) is Canadas second largest church (after the Roman Catholic Church), and its largest Protestant denomination. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... SUNY Potsdams Satterlee Hall The State University of New York at Potsdam, also known as SUNY Potsdam, is a public university located in the Village of Potsdam in St. ... The Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), is the military academy of the Canadian Forces and is a full degree-granting university. ...


Milliken has long been active in political matters, having served as president of the Kingston and the Islands provincial Liberal Party Association in the 1980s. He subscribed to the Canadian House of Commons Hansard at age sixteen, and once wrote a thesis paper on Question Period.[7] Unlike most MPs, he was already well-versed in parliamentary procedure at the time of his first election.[8] Hansard is the traditional name for the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. ... Question Period or Oral Questions is a Canadian parliamentary practice similar to the British Prime Ministers Questions in which Members of Parliament submit questions to the government ministers including the Prime Minister for answer. ...


Member of Parliament

Milliken won the Kingston and the Islands Liberal nomination in 1988 over local alderman Alex Lampropoulos,[9] and defeated well-known Progressive Conservative cabinet minister Flora MacDonald by 2,712 votes in the 1988 general election. The Progressive Conservatives won the election with a majority government, and in early 1989 Milliken was named as the Liberal Party's critic for electoral reform, associate critic for senior citizens, and whip for eastern and northern Ontario.[10] Shortly thereafter, he was named to the parliamentary standing committee on elections, privileges, procedures and private members' business.[11] He supported Jean Chr├ętien for the federal Liberal leadership in 1990.[12] Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada or Conseil des ministres) plays an important role in the Government of Canada in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Flora MacDonald (1722 – March 5, 1790), Jacobite heroine, was the daughter of Ranald MacDonald of Milton in the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, and his wife Marion, the daughter of Angus MacDonald. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... In the Westminster System, a majority government is one in which the government enjoys an absolute majority of seats in the legislature or Parliament. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ... Joseph Jacques Jean Chrétien, usually known as Jean Chrétien, PC, QC, BA, BCL, LLD (h. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ...


He was easily re-elected in the 1993 election, as the Liberal Party won a majority government, and was named to a two-year term as parliamentary secretary to the Government House Leader in December 1993. He also became chair of the Commons procedure and House affairs committee.[13] Milliken was a leading candidate for Speaker of the House in January 1994, but lost to Gilbert Parent. Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... In the parliamentary systems of several Commonwealth countries, such as Canada and Australia, it is customary for the prime minister to appoint parliamentary secretaries (in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, parliamentary assistants) from their caucus to assist cabinet ministers with their work. ... The Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (French: Leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes), more commonly known as the Government House Leader, is the Cabinet minister responsible for planning and managing the governments legislative program in the Canadian House of Commons. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Gilbert Parent was a Canadian Member of Parliament. ...


Milliken supported fellow Kingstonian John Gerretsen for the leadership of the Ontario Liberal Party in 1996 and moved to the camp of the eventual winner, Dalton McGuinty, after Gerretsen was eliminated on the second ballot.[14] In the same year, Milliken and fellow Liberal MP John Godfrey introduced the Godfrey-Milliken Bill as a satirical response to the American Helms-Burton Act.[15] The Bill, which would have allowed the descendants of United Empire Loyalists to claim compensation for land seized in the American Revolution, was drafted in response to provisions in the Helms-Burton Act which sought to punish Canadian companies for using land nationalised by Fidel Castro's government in Cuba.[16] Godfrey and Milliken gave a twenty-minute presention on their bill in Washington, D.C. in early 1997, and were greeted with warm applause from local Helms-Burton opponents.[17] John Gerretsen (born June 9, 1942) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Ontario Liberal Party is a center-right provincial political party in the province of Ontario, Canada. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Dalton James Patrick McGuinty Jr. ... Hon. ... Godfrey-Milliken Bill, officially the The American Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Loyalty) Act was a Private Members Bill introduced in the Canadian parliament by Liberal MPs Peter Milliken and John Godfrey. ... The Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996 (better known as the Helms-Burton Act) is a United States federal law which strengthens and continues the United States embargo against Cuba. ... Nationalization is the act of taking assets into state ownership. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ... ... ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Milliken was re-elected for a third term in 1997 election, and became Deputy Speaker of the House for the parliament that followed.[18] 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


Speaker of the House

Milliken was elected Speaker of the House in late January 2001, after five ballots of a secret vote of all MPs held at the first sitting of parliament following the 2000 federal election.[19] He was widely praised by government and opposition MPs for his rulings, which were considered very fair.[20] He also brought new life to the chair in delivering his rulings and remarks with a sarcastic humour. Elected for his fifth term in 2004, he was the unanimous choice of MPs to be re-elected Speaker for the next parliament.[21] 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


In 2005, Milliken prevented an early federal election by breaking a tie vote on the second reading of Bill C-48, an amendment to the 2005 federal budget, which was a confidence motion. The vote was 152 in favour and 152 against prior to his vote, and he voted in favour of the bill. The Speaker does not vote except in the case of a tie, and must vote in such a way as to keep the matter open for further consideration if possible (ie. passing C-48 to allow further debate for a third reading). This was the first time that a Speaker used his tie-breaker vote on a confidence motion.[22] 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... canada is the best but those fucking americans can die fuck sakes they should leave my country and stop bombing my people by a minority government in Canada since the budget presented by the minority government led by Joe Clark in 1979. ... A motion of no confidence, also called a motion of non-confidence, a censure motion, a no-confidence motion, or simply a confidence motion, is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ... Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ...

Wikinews has news related to:
Speaker breaks tie by voting for Canadian budget

Milliken won his riding for a sixth time in the 2006 election, as the Conservative Party won a minority government nationally. Though his party is no longer in government, he was re-elected as Speaker of the House for the 39th Parliament on April 3, 2006, defeating fellow Liberals Diane Marleau and Marcel Proulx on the first ballot.[23] With his re-election, he became only the second Speaker chosen from an opposition party in the history of the House of Commons (James Jerome being the other).[24] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... The initial seat distribution of the 39th Canadian Parliament Stephen Harper is the Prime Minister of the 39th Parliament. ... April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Diane Marleau, PC , MP (born June 21, 1943 in Kirkland Lake, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... Marcel Proulx (born March 6, 1946 in LOrignal, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... James Alexander (Jim) Jerome (born March 4, 1933) is a Canadian jurist and former politician and Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


In February 2007, Milliken rejected the Conservative government's challenge of an opposition bill that commits the government to implement the Kyoto Accord. The government argued that the bill introduced new spending, and could not be introduced by someone who was not a minister. Milliken ruled that the bill did not specifically commit the government to any new spending, and was therefore in order. The bill was approved by the house, despite government opposition.[25] Earth as seen by Apollo 17 The Kyoto Protocol is an amendment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), an international treaty on global warming. ...


Milliken has cast a total of three tie-breaking votes, more than any other speaker in Canadian history.[26]


Tables of offices held

Preceded by
Gilbert Parent
Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons
2001-
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Flora MacDonald
Member of Parliament for Kingston and the Islands
1988-
Succeeded by
Incumbent

Gilbert Parent was a Canadian Member of Parliament. ... Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flora MacDonald (1722 – March 5, 1790), Jacobite heroine, was the daughter of Ranald MacDonald of Milton in the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, and his wife Marion, the daughter of Angus MacDonald. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Peter Milliken's Constituency Website
  • The Speaker of the House of Commons (Canada) Website
  • Federal Political Biography from the Library of Parliament

Electoral record

2006 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Liberal (x)Peter Milliken 28,548 45.86 $51,250.50
     Conservative Lou Grimshaw 16,230 26.07 $60,915.12
     New Democratic Party Rob Hutchison 11,946 19.19 $28,094.39
     Green Eric Walton 5,006 8.04 $18,532.43
     Independent Karl Eric Walker 296 0.48
     Canadian Action Party Don Rogers 222 0.36 $6,359.50
Total valid votes 62,248 100.00
Total rejected ballots 240
Turnout 62,488 65.97
Electors on the lists 94,720
2004 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Liberal (x)Peter Milliken 28,544 52.45 $45,543.70
     Conservative Blair MacLean 12,582 23.12 $83,209.34
     New Democratic Party Rob Hutchison 8,964 16.47 $18,440.27
     Green Janina Fisher Balfour 3,339 6.13 $14,087.39
     Christian Heritage Terry Marshall 481 0.88 $1,652.04
     Independent Rosie The Clown Elston 237 0.44 $134.54
     Canadian Action Party Don Rogers 179 0.33 $6,285.00
     Independent Karl Eric Walker 100 0.18 $670.21
Total valid votes 54,426 100.00
Total rejected ballots 175
Turnout 54,601 60.32
Electors on the lists 90,523
2000 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Liberal (x)Peter Milliken 26,457 51.69 $38,161.64
     Progressive Conservative Blair MacLean 9,222 18.02 $58,975.69
     Canadian Alliance Kevin Goligher 7,904 15.44 $28,534.05
     New Democratic Party Gary Wilson 4,951 9.67 $27,262.77
     Green Chris Milburn 2,652 5.18 $4,200.19
Total valid votes 51,186 100.00
Total rejected ballots 203
Turnout 51,389 58.53
Electors on the lists 87,793
1997 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Liberal (x)Peter Milliken 25,632 49.51 $39,224
     Progressive Conservative Helen Cooper 11,296 21.82 $44,719
     Reform Dave Clarke 6,761 13.06 $33,384
     New Democratic Party Gary Wilson 6,433 12.42 $28,694
     Green Chris Walker 902 1.74 $1,748
     Christian Heritage Terry Marshall 751 1.45 $127
Total valid votes 51,775 100.00
Total rejected ballots 239
Turnout 52,014 62.77
Electors on the lists 82,869
1993 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Liberal (x)Peter Milliken 32,372 56.46 $45,912
     Progressive Conservative Barry Gordon 10,935 19.07 $54,157
     Reform Sean McAdam 7,175 12.51 $32,259
     New Democratic Party Mary Ann Higgs 4,051 7.06 $22,979
     National Chris Papadopoulos 1,768 3.08 $8,171
     Christian Heritage Terry Marshall 663 1.16 $1,442
     Natural Law Chris Wilson 376 0.66 $0
Total valid votes 57,340 100.00
Total rejected ballots 369
Turnout 57,709 60.65
Electors on the lists 95,154
1988 federal election : Kingston and the Islands edit
Party Candidate Votes %
     Liberal Peter Milliken 23,121 40.62
     Progressive Conservative (x)Flora MacDonald 20,409 35.86
     New Democratic Party Len Johnson 11,442 20.10
     Christian Heritage Terry Marshall 1,646 2.89
     Libertarian John Hayes 301 0.53
Total valid votes 56,919 100.00
Total rejected ballots 269
Turnout 57,188 74.26
Electors on the lists 77,014

All electoral information is taken from Elections Canada. Italicized expenditures from elections after 1997 refer to submitted totals, and are presented when the final reviewed totals are not available. Expenditures from 1997 refer to submitted totals. Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-leaning conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada is intending to run a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 Canadian federal election. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Rob Hutchison is a Canadian politician. ... The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. ... The Green Party of Ontario is a minor political party in Ontario, Canada. ... Several independent candidates campaigned as candidates in the 2004 federal election, representing a variety of political viewpoints and ambitions. ... The Canadian Action Party (CAP) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1997. ... Don Rogers is a longtime municipal political in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-leaning conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Blair MacLean is a Canadian politician. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Rob Hutchison is a Canadian politician. ... The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. ... The Green Party of Canada ran a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2004 federal election. ... The Christian Heritage Party of Canada is a federal political party that advocates the governance of Canada according to the inspired, inerrant written Word of God. [1] This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first... The Christian Heritage Party is a minor political party in Canada. ... Several independent candidates campaigned as candidates in the 2004 federal election, representing a variety of political viewpoints and ambitions. ... The Canadian Action Party (CAP) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1997. ... Don Rogers is a longtime municipal political in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... Several independent candidates campaigned as candidates in the 2004 federal election, representing a variety of political viewpoints and ambitions. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Blair MacLean is a Canadian politician. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance fielded several candidates in the 2000 federal election, and won 66 seats to become the Official Opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Gary Wilson (born 1946 in Timmins, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. ... Chris Milburn is the Green Party of Canada candidate in the upcoming Canadian federal election, 2004 in the riding of Sydney--Victoria, Nova Scotia. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Helen Cooper (born November 13, 1946) is a Canadian politician and administrator. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... Dave Clarke (born 1960) is a municipal politician in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... Gary Wilson (born 1946 in Timmins, Ontario) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. ... The Green Party of Canada is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1983. ... The Green Party of Canada ran a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2004 federal election. ... The Christian Heritage Party of Canada is a federal political party that advocates the governance of Canada according to the inspired, inerrant written Word of God. [1] This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first... The Christian Heritage Party is a minor political party in Canada. ... Popular vote map with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario is a political party in Ontario, Canada. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... The Canadian Alliance fielded several candidates in the 2000 federal election, and won 66 seats to become the Official Opposition party in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The New Democratic Party ran a full slate of candidates in the 1993 federal election, and won 9 seats out of 295. ... The National Party was a short-lived Canadian political party that contested the 1993 Canadian election. ... The National Party of Canada ran a number of candidates in the 1993 federal election, none of whom were elected. ... The Christian Heritage Party of Canada is a federal political party that advocates the governance of Canada according to the inspired, inerrant written Word of God. [1] This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first... The Christian Heritage Party is a minor political party in Canada. ... The Natural Law Party of Canada was the Canadian branch of the international Natural Law Party, the political arm of Maharishi Mahesh Yogis Transcendental Meditation movement. ... The Natural Law Party of Canada ran several candidates in the 1993 federal election, none of whom were elected. ... Map of the Popular Vote with bar graphs showing seat totals in the provinces and territories The Canadian Parliament after the 1988 election The Canadian federal election of 1988 was held November 21, 1988, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Kingston and the Islands is a federal and provincial electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1968, and in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario since 1967. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Flora MacDonald (1722 – March 5, 1790), Jacobite heroine, was the daughter of Ranald MacDonald of Milton in the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, and his wife Marion, the daughter of Angus MacDonald. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The New Democratic Party ran a full slate of 298 candidates in the 1988 federal election, and elected 43 members to become the third-largest party in parliament. ... The Christian Heritage Party of Canada is a federal political party that advocates the governance of Canada according to the inspired, inerrant written Word of God. [1] This socially and fiscally conservative party held its founding convention in Hamilton, Ontario in November 1987, where Ed Vanwoudenberg was elected its first... The Christian Heritage Party is a minor political party in Canada. ... The Libertarian Party of Canada is a minor political party in Canada that adheres to the philosophy of libertarianism. ... The Libertarian Party of Canada fielded a number of candidates in the 1993 federal election, none of whom were elected. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ Jennifer Ditchburn, "Peter Milliken fascinated by Commons workings from an early age", Canadian Press, 29 January 2001, 18:04 report.
  2. ^ Peter Milliken biographical sketch, "Canada votes 2006", Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
  3. ^ Judi McLeod, "Gentleman Politician", Kingston Whig-Standard, 5 August 1988, p. 1.
  4. ^ Lynn Messerschmidt, "Longtime Liberal challenges city councillor for nomination", Kingston Whig-Standard, 9 March 1988, p. 1.
  5. ^ Anne Kershaw, "Peter Milliken: Liberal Party", Kingston Whig-Standard, 19 November 1988, p. 1.
  6. ^ Peter Milliken, Commencement Address to the State University of New York at Potsdam, 20 May 2001.
  7. ^ Jeffrey Simpson, "Speaking of politics: a race too close to call", Globe and Mail, 10 January 2001, A15.
  8. ^ Stevie Cameron, "Time will tell whether promising neophytes produce a good show", Globe and Mail, 24 November 1988, A2.
  9. ^ Carol Goar, "The first time Bill MacAleer ...", Toronto Star, 26 May 1988.
  10. ^ Bill Hutchison, "Milliken appointed to shadow cabinet", Kingston Whig-Standard, 7 February 1989, p. 1.
  11. ^ "Milliken appointed to special Commons committee", Kingston Whig-Standard, 18 April 1989, p. 1.
  12. ^ Geoff Pounsett, "Missing Meech deadline won't kill Canada: Chretien", Kingston Whig-Standard, 28 May 1990, p. 2.
  13. ^ Hugh Winsor, "Chretien grooms rookies", Globe and Mail, 7 December 1993, A1; "MPs may try to halt change in ridings", Hamilton Spectator, 15 March 1994, C9.
  14. ^ Murray Hogben, "Local delegates had plenty of decisions to make", Kingston-Whig Standard, 2 December 1996.
  15. ^ "Beware the wrath of the Loyalists", Financial Post, 25 July 1996, p. 12 and Allan Fotheringham, "Ridicule is the best policy when taking on Helms-Burton", Financial Post, 27 July 1996, p. 17.
  16. ^ "MPs mock Helms-Burton at Congress", Globe and Mail, 12 February 1997, N10.
  17. ^ Kathleen Kenna, "U.S. crowd applauds MPs' jabs at Cuba law", Toronto Star, 12 February 1997, A16.
  18. ^ "PM makes Reform MP a deputy Speaker", Globe and Mail, 24 September 1997, A4.
  19. ^ Broadcast News, 29 January 2001, 16:34 report.
  20. ^ Graham Fraser, "It's High Noon and he's the marshal", Toronto Star, 9 June 2001, NR04.
  21. ^ "Peter Milliken is the unanimous choice of M-P's to be speaker of the House of Commons", Broadcast News, 4 October 2004, 11:07 report.
  22. ^ John Ward, "Speaker's tie-breaking vote to save the minority government was a first", Canadian Press, 19 May 2005, 17:54 report.
  23. ^ Brock Harrison, "Speaker's job still available", Kingston Whig-Standard, 7 February 2006, p. 1.
  24. ^ There was also an "opposition speaker" in the 1926, although the circumstances were much different. Rodolphe Lemieux, a Liberal, was chosen as speaker during the Liberal government of William Lyon Mackenzie King, and continued to serve in that capacity after King's government was defeated and a new ministry formed by Arthur Meighen of the Conservative Party.
  25. ^ Allan Woods, "Honour Kyoto, House tells PM", Toronto Star, 15 February 2007, A1.
  26. ^ Donna Jacobs, "Speaker Milliken likes it heated", Ottawa Citizen, 5 June 2006, A2.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Peter Milliken (252 words)
The Honourable Peter Andrew Stewart Milliken (born November 12, 1946) is Speaker of the Canadian House of Commons, a position he has held since 2001.
Having been an avid student of parliamentary procedure since his teens, Milliken was named assistant House Leader for the opposition Liberals, a rarity for a freshman member as new members are not normally familiar enough with the sometimes archaic practices of parliament.
Milliken was re-elected for a third term in Canadian federal election, 1997 and was named Deputy Speaker of the House.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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