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Encyclopedia > Peter Mackay
Hon. Peter Gordon MacKay
Peter MacKay
Minister of National Defence
Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Incumbent
Riding Flag of Nova Scotia Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough (1997-2004)
Flag of Nova Scotia Central Nova (2004-present)
In office since 1997
Preceded by Roseanne Skoke
Born September 27, 1965 (1965-09-27) (age 42)
Flag of Canada New Glasgow, Nova Scotia
Residence Pictou, Nova Scotia
Political party

Conservative The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable ( or formerly The Honble) is a title of quality attached to the names of certain classes of persons. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 393 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1204 × 1835 pixel, file size: 1 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For the ecclesiastical office, see Incumbent (ecclesiastical). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nova_Scotia. ... Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough was a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nova_Scotia. ... Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Roseanne Skoke (born September 11, 1954 in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada) was a Liberal MP for the riding of Central Nova from 1993 to 1997. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Website:http://www. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Pictou is a Canadian town on the northern coast of Pictou County, Nova Scotia. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...

Profession(s) Crown Attorney, lawyer
Spouse Single

Peter Gordon MacKay, Conservative, QC, MP (born September 27, 1965) serves as the member of Parliament (MP) for Central Nova, Nova Scotia, Canada's Minister of National Defence and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency. Crown Attorney or Crown Counsel are the public prosecutor in the legal system of Canada. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The Privy Council Office as it appeared in the 1880s The Queens Privy Council for Canada (French: Conseil privé de la Reine pour le Canada) is the council of advisers to the Queen of Canada, whose members are appointed by the Governor General of Canada for life on the... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... 38th Parliament Members of the House of Commons in the 38th Parliament of Canada, as of May 17, 2005. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ... The Minister of National Defence (French: Ministre de la Défense nationale) is the Canadian politician within the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the Department of National Defence which oversees the Canadian Forces. ... The Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency is the member of the Cabinet of Canada who also serves as the chief executive of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA). ...


MacKay was the final leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC Party). On October 15, 2003, he and Canadian Alliance leader Stephen Harper agreed to merge the two parties, forming the Conservative Party of Canada. In December 2003, members of both parties ratified the merger. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...

Contents

Early life and career

MacKay was born in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, the son of PC cabinet minister and lumber businessman Elmer MacKay. His mother, Macha MacKay, is a psychologist and peace activist, living in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, where Peter grew up with his three siblings. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Acadia University in 1987, MacKay then studied Law at Dalhousie University and was called to the Nova Scotia Bar in June 1991. He worked as a lawyer for the law firm of Thyssen Henschel in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and in Düsseldorf and Kassel, Germany. Website:http://www. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... Elmer MacIntosh MacKay, PC , QC , BA , LL.B (born August 5, 1936) is a retired Canadian politician. ... A psychologist is a scientist or clinician who studies psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior and cognition. ... Wolfville streetscape, spring 2006. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Acadia University is a university located in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Dalhousie University is a university located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... The City of Halifax (1841-1996) was the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, and the largest city in Atlantic Canada. ... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867... The title of this article contains the character ü. Where it is unavailable or not desired, the name may be represented as Duesseldorf. ... This article is about the city of Kassel in Hessen, Germany. ...


In 1993, MacKay accepted an appointment as Crown Attorney for the Central Region of Nova Scotia. He prosecuted cases at all levels, including youth and provincial courts as well as the Supreme Court of Canada. MacKay has publicly stated that the major impetus for his entry into federal politics were his frustrations with the shortcomings in the justice system, particularly his perception that the courts do not care about the impact crime has on victims. Crown Attorney or Crown Counsel are the public prosecutor in the legal system of Canada. ... The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is the highest court of Canada and is the final court of appeal in the Canadian justice system. ...


Member of Parliament

MacKay was first elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the June 2, 1997 federal election for Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough, a riding in northeastern Nova Scotia. He was one of a handful of newly elected "Young Turk" PC MPs (including John Herron, André Bachand and Scott Brison), who were under 35 years old when elected and were considered the future leadership material that might restore the ailing Tories to their glory days. In his first term of office, MacKay served as Justice Critic and House Leader for the Progressive Conservative parliamentary caucus. MacKay was the Tory member of the Board of Internal Economy and the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. He also acted as an associate member of the Standing Committees on Canadian Heritage, Finance and the sub-committee on the Study of Sport. The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... 36th Parliament The Canadian federal election of 1997 was held on June 2, 1997, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough was a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons. ... An electoral district is a geographically-based constituency upon which Canadas representative democracy is based. ... John Herron. ... André Bachand Not to be confused with André Bachand, Liberal MP from Missisquoi André Bachand (born December 8, 1961 in Quebec City, Quebec) is a Canadian politician, who represented the riding of Richmond—Arthabaska as member of the Progressive Conservatives from 1997 to 2003. ... Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967), Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ...


MacKay was re-elected in the 2000 federal election and was frequently touted by the media as a possible successor to PC Party leader Joe Clark. Many of his initial supporters referred to his strong performances in the House of Commons and magnetism as key attributes that would make him a popular leader. MacKay has been voted the "sexiest male MP in the House of Commons" by the Hill Times (a Parliament Hill newspaper) for six years in a row. When asked in a 2001 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation documentary on the resurgence of the PC Party if he would ever consider running for the PC leadership, MacKay quipped, "If there's one thing I've learned in politics it's 'never say never.' Jean Charest taught me that." The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the country’s national public radio and television broadcaster. ... John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. ...


In August 2001, he was one of several PC MPs to engage in open cooperation talks with disaffected Canadian Alliance MPs in Mont-Tremblant, Quebec. Eventually a union of sorts was created between the PCs and the newly formed Democratic Representative Caucus (DRC). MacKay was appointed House Leader of the new PC-DR Parliamentary Coalition Caucus when it was formally recognized as a political body on September 10, 2001. The PC-DR initiative collapsed in April 2002, raising questions about Clark's leadership. Clark announced his impending resignation as party leader at the PC Party's bi-annual convention held in Edmonton, Alberta in August 2002. MacKay's name was one of the first to be raised as a possible leadership contender. Mont-Tremblant, Quebec is a small village in the Laurentian mountains about one hour forty-five minutes north of Montreal. ... , Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Official languages French Government - Lieutenant-Governor Pierre Duchesne - Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 75 - Senate seats 24 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area  Ranked 2nd - Total 1,542,056 km² (595... Democratic Reform Association logo The Democratic Representative Caucus was a group of Canadian Members of Parliament who left the Canadian Alliance in 2001 in protest against the leadership of Stockwell Day. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Edmonton is the capital of the Canadian province of Alberta, situated in the north central region of the province, an area with some of the most fertile farm land on the prairies. ...


2003 leadership race

MacKay ultimately waited to announce his candidacy until many of the "dream candidates" such as provincial Progressive Conservative Premiers Bernard Lord, Mike Harris and Ralph Klein clearly stated their intentions not to run for the leadership. MacKay formally launched his leadership campaign in his hometown of New Glasgow in January 2003. From the onset of the campaign, MacKay insisted that he was "not a merger candidate," and that his primary goal upon assuming the leadership, would be rebuilding the fractured conservative movement from within the PC tent. For much of the race, MacKay was perceived as the clear front-runner. Several opponents, including United Alternative candidate and former PC Party Treasurer Jim Prentice, social conservative candidate Craig Chandler and Red Tory Nova Scotia MP Scott Brison, painted MacKay as a status quo or establishment candidate who could effectively question the Prime Minister, but could never be the Prime Minister. Bernard Lord, LL.B., BA, MLA (born September 27, 1965 in Roberval, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... Michael Deane Harris (born January 23, 1945, in Toronto, Ontario) was the twenty-second Premier of Ontario from June 26, 1995 to April 15, 2002. ... Ralph Phillip Klein (born November 1, 1942) was the premier of the Canadian province of Alberta and leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives from 1992 until his retirement in 2006. ... Website:http://www. ... Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... P. E. James Jim Prentice, PC, MP (born July 20, 1956, in South Porcupine, Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Craig B. Chandler (born 1970) is a Canadian businessman, buffoon, pundit, and political and religious nutbar. ... The Red Tory Tradition: Ancient Roots-New Routes, by Ron Dart Red Tory is a term given to a political philosophy, tradition, and disposition in Canada. ... Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967), Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ...


MacKay's campaign was largely based on his charisma and popularity rather than on policies or new directions. The leadership campaign was challenging for MacKay who described it near the end as "bitter and resentful." His leadership opponents questioned him on a number of issues and from both the progressive and conservative sides of the party's political spectrum. His perceived waffling on the merger issue, his inability to make clear statements on key PC foreign policy platforms and his tough "law and order" stances on justice issues were all challenged by his competitors. Ultimately, MacKay is largely viewed by political analysts as a Blue Tory. While his fiscal conservatism has never been questioned, he remains ambiguously unsupportive of social issues such as same-sex marriage and the decriminalization of marijuana, which alienated him somewhat from the influential Red Tory wing of the PC Party. MacKay generally takes a conservative view towards foreign policy issues, his support of the 2003 invasion of Iraq being a prime example. Blue Tories are, in Canadian politics, members of the former Progressive Conservative Party of Canada and current Conservative Party of Canada who are more ideologically Right wing. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Cannabis (also known as marijuana[1] or ganja[2] in its herbal form and hashish in its resinous form[3]) is a psychoactive product of the plant Cannabis sativa L. subsp. ... The Red Tory Tradition: Ancient Roots-New Routes, by Ron Dart Red Tory is a term given to a political philosophy, tradition, and disposition in Canada. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ...


Convention and controversy

MacKay entered the first ballot of the PC leadership convention held on May 31, 2003 with roughly 41% of the delegates supporting him. However, on the second ballot, MacKay's support dropped to 39%. On the third ballot, MacKay's support reached 45% but many of his supporters were convinced that he had hit his popular peak. Some analysts noted that the eliminated third-place challenger David Orchard, drew his 25% bulk of delegate supporters largely from the Western prairie provinces. All camps were aware that Orchard would likely walk out of the convention if he failed to win the leadership again, freeing up his delegates to vote as they wished. The second-place candidate, Calgary lawyer and former PC Party Treasurer Jim Prentice, was viewed as a logical choice for Orchard's western supporters once Orchard was eliminated. However, as the results of the third ballot were called, MacKay's campaign manager, Tory Senator Noel Kinsella, hastily arranged a backroom meeting between MacKay, Orchard and their campaign advisors. During the meeting, MacKay reached a deal with his rival and Orchard emerged from the room urging his delegates to support MacKay. Press officials immediately demanded to know what had inspired Orchard's surprise move. Orchard repeatedly referred to a "gentleman's agreement" made between himself and MacKay that had led to his qualified support. The 2003 Progressive Conservative leadership convention was held on May 31, 2003 to elect a leader or the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Orchard (born June 28, 1950, in Borden, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian political figure and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... Noël A. Kinsella (born November 28, 1939) is Leader of the Opposition in the Canadian Senate. ...


MacKay won the final ballot with nearly 65% of the delegates supporting him. For the next few weeks, the specific details of the "Orchard deal" remained vague; a secret between MacKay, Orchard and their advisors.[1] However, it was eventually revealed that the infamous "Orchard deal" promised a review of the PC Party's policies on the North American Free Trade Agreement, no merger or joint candidates with the Canadian Alliance, and a promise to redouble efforts to rebuild the national status of the Progressive Conservative Party. The agreement also included re-examining the PC Party's policies on government subsidies for national railways and preserving the environment. The deal also requested that MacKay "clean-up" the party's head office and specifically requested that the party's National Director be fired. Further evidence later revealed Scott Brison's cellphone number written in the margins of the note for some unexplained reason. In an attempt to heal internal rifts after the convention, Mackay edited out the number. After Brison defected to the Liberal party however, Mackay revealed the original copy. The agreement prompted much outrage and controversy amongst United Alternative supporters and was ribaldly referred to by CA MP Jason Kenney as "a deal with the Devil." NAFTA redirects here. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967), Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ... Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... Jason Kenney (born May 30, 1968 in Oakville, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ...


At first MacKay seemed to be willing to adhere to the deal. In June, several Clark appointed personnel were let go from the party's main office and MacKay appointed new experienced staff whose loyalties were more closely linked to himself and former Prime Minister and PC Party leader Brian Mulroney. MacKay also appointed a couple of low level staff workers who had been supportive of David Orchard's leadership bid. In July, MacKay struck up a "Blue Ribbon PC Policy Review Panel" made up of Tory MPs, Senators and Orchard himself, that was to be chaired by Tory MP Bill Casey, in order to reexamine the party's policies on NAFTA. The Committee was scheduled to hold talks across the country and make a report to the leader by January 2004. Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... William D. Casey (born February 19, 1945 in Amherst, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ...


By mid-July, political opponents and fellow Tories began attacking MacKay over the "Orchard deal." MacKay's conservative rival Stephen Harper suggested that the PC Party had hit rock-bottom when its policies and directions would be beholden to a "prairie socialist." The secretive nature of the deal also led to concerns from within the party's headquarters and constituency associations. David Orchard was seen by many within the party as an "outsider" who was attempting to turn the Progressive Conservative Party into the "Prairie Co-operative Party." Some felt that MacKay's credibility and leadership were undermined by the unscrupulousness of the deal and that electoral expectations were low for the upcoming election that was expected to occur in less than a year's time. As media personality Rex Murphy noted in a Globe and Mail column, MacKay's leadership arrived "stillborn" and that perhaps for the first time in recent memory, a party immediately emerged from a leadership convention grievously weakened and even less united than when it entered the convention. Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Socialism is a social and economic system (or the political philosophy advocating such a system) in which the economic means of production are owned and controlled collectively by the people. ... Rex Murphy (born March, 1947, Carbonear, Newfoundland) is a noted Canadian commentator. ... The Globe and Mail is a large English language national newspaper based in Toronto, Canada, and printed in seven cities across Canada. ... The expected result of pregnancy is the birth of a living child. ...


Conservative party merger

The decline in MacKay's popularity upon assuming leadership of the PC Party could be reflected in the fact that an August 17th Ipsos-Reid public opinion poll suggested that by August 2003 the party's national support had dropped to 12% from 19% in May 2003 (the same disappointing level of support the party received in the 2000 election). This could be compared to the increases in support enjoyed by both the Liberal Party of Canada (44%) and the Canadian Alliance (15%). In the same poll, only 5% of Canadians viewed MacKay as a possible future Prime Minister, below Stephen Harper (6%), Jack Layton (17%) and Paul Martin (54%). Ipsos-Reid is a research company founded in 1975 by Didier Truchot, a Paris-based communications specialist. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... John Gilbert Jack Layton, PC, MP, PhD (born July 18, 1950) is a social democratic Canadian politician and current leader of Canadas New Democratic Party (since 2003). ... Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB, LLD (h. ...


Under intense pressure from advisors and public musings that the divided PCs would be marginalized in a future election between a relatively stable western-based CA under Stephen Harper and the massively popular Paul Martin Liberals, MacKay encouraged talks between high-profile members of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives. It should be noted that the PC Party, whose leadership MacKay assumed, was experiencing serious difficulties in raising campaign funds, keeping members and was still faced with paying down the remainder ($6 million) of the party's staggering $10 million dollar debt borrowed for the previous election. According to a strict interpretation of the "Orchard deal", talks regarding merger were permitted, only a full-fledged merger or the running of joint candidates was forbidden. By September 2003, Orchard became openly critical of MacKay's facilitation of merger talks and criticized MacKay for not getting the PC Party into an election footing for a vote that was widely expected to occur in Spring 2004, another stipulation of the agreement.


On October 15, 2003, the merger talks culminated in MacKay and Alliance leader Stephen Harper signing an Agreement in Principle on the establishment of the Conservative Party of Canada, whereby the Progressive Conservatives and the Canadian Alliance would merge to form a new Conservative Party of Canada. While MacKay was roundly criticized in some Red Tory circles for permitting a union under his watch, MacKay's efforts to sell the merger to the PC membership were successful: 90.4% of the party's elected delegates supported the deal in a vote on December 6, 2003. The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Red Tory Tradition: Ancient Roots-New Routes, by Ron Dart Red Tory is a term given to a political philosophy, tradition, and disposition in Canada. ...


Some PC caucus members refused to accept the merger: long-time Tory MP and former Prime Minister Joe Clark continued to sit as a "Progressive Conservative" for the remainder of the Parliament, as did MPs John Herron and André Bachand, while Scott Brison left the new party to join the Liberal Party in December 2003. In January, 2004 several Tory Senators left the party to sit as independents or "Progressive Conservatives." Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), is the Minister of the Crown who is head of the Government of Canada. ... John Herron. ... André Bachand Not to be confused with André Bachand, Liberal MP from Missisquoi André Bachand (born December 8, 1961 in Quebec City, Quebec) is a Canadian politician, who represented the riding of Richmond—Arthabaska as member of the Progressive Conservatives from 1997 to 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


MacKay announced on January 13, 2004, that he would not run for the leadership of the new Conservative Party. On March 22, he was named deputy leader of the new party by newly-elected leader Stephen Harper. He was easily re-elected in the June 28, 2004 federal election in the newly redistributed riding of Central Nova. January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ...


On September 29, 2005, the Premier of Nova Scotia, John Hamm, announced his intention to resign. There was speculation that MacKay would return to the province to pursue provincial politics and enter the Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Party leadership race to become the Premier. MacKay would have been considered a front-runner in the race, however, he decided to remain with the Federal Conservatives. Categories: Stub | Nova Scotia premiers ... Dr. John Frederick Hamm, MLA , MD (born April 8, 1938) is the current premier of Nova Scotia, Canada. ... The Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Party is a centre-right political party in Nova Scotia, Canada. ... The Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative leadership election of 2006 will be held on February 11, 2006 to select a replacement for John Hamm, the Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the Progressive Conservative Association of Nova Scotia. ... Categories: Stub | Nova Scotia premiers ...


The Liberal government lost a motion of non-confidence on November 28, 2005. In the resulting January 2006 election, the Conservative Party was elected with a minority government. MacKay was one of very few Conservatives in the entire country to lose support. He did manage to retain his seat by a comfortable margin against NDP candidate Alexis MacDonald. Alexis MacDonald (right) with NDP MP Alexa McDonough. ...


Personal life

MacKay's longtime fiancée was Lisa Michelle Merrithew, daughter of former Mulroney cabinet minister Gerald Stairs Merrithew. They reportedly ended their engagement in 2004. MacKay was then romantically linked to fellow MP Belinda Stronach in published reports. In an interview in the Toronto Star on January 8, 2005, Stronach confirmed that she and MacKay were dating. Stronach, elected as a Conservative in the 2004 election, crossed the floor to the Liberal Party on May 17, 2005. She declined to comment on what impact this would have on their relationship. Lisa Michelle Merrithew (born May 30, 1972 in Saint John, New Brunswick) is a noted Canadian public relations consultant and was the former fiancee of Peter MacKay, deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada and former leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... Gerald (Gerry) Stairs Merrithew, (September 23, 1931 - September 5, 2004), born at Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada, was an educator and statesman. ... Belinda Caroline Stronach, PC, MP (born May 2, 1966 in Newmarket, Ontario) is a Canadian businessperson, philanthropist, politician, and a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In politics, crossing the floor is to vote against party lines, especially where this is considered unusual or controversial. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ...


On May 18, 2005, MacKay told the CBC that his relationship with Stronach was indeed over, and that it had come as a surprise to him that she had crossed the floor. According to Don Martin, a National Post columnist who wrote a biography titled : "Belinda: the Political and Private Life of Belinda Stronach" in September 2006, MacKay reacted "with volcanic fury" when he learned about her defection. [2] is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the country’s national public radio and television broadcaster. ... Don Martin (May 18, 1931 – January 6, 2000) was a popular American cartoon artist whose best-known work appeared in MAD magazine from 1956 to 1988. ... The National Post is a Canadian English-language national newspaper based in Don Mills, Ontario, a district of Toronto. ...


On October 19, 2006, there was a debate on the Conservative Party's clean air plan was taking place when MP Mark Holland said that a Liberal colleague, David McGuinty asked MacKay about the impact of pollution on humans and animals by asking, "What about your dog?". This was intended as a jab at MacKay in reference to the time he was photographed on his father's farm with the animal after his relationship with Belinda Stronach had ended. Holland claims this is when MacKay allegedly made reference to Belinda Stronach's empty chair (she was absent that day) and said "You already have her." Holland lodged a complaint with the Commons Speaker and has demanded an apology be made by him. Stronach has said that the comment was disrespectful to both herself and Canadian women, as has herself asked for an apology. MacKay has denied referring to Stronach as a "dog".[3] The alleged comment was not heard by Speaker of the House Peter Milliken and it was not recorded in the official Hansard. Afterwards, Milliken and his staff said that he could not hear the remarks on the tape recording.[4] Mark Holland (born October 16, 1974) is the Canadian Member of Parliament for the Ontario riding of Ajax-Pickering. ... David J. McGuinty (born February 25, 1960 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a Canadian politician and the brother of Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty. ... Belinda Caroline Stronach, PC, MP (born May 2, 1966 in Newmarket, Ontario) is a Canadian businessperson, philanthropist, politician, and a Liberal Member of Parliament (MP) in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Current house speaker Peter Milliken In Canada the Speaker of the House of Commons (French: Président de la Chambre des communes) is the presiding officer of the lower house and is elected by fellow MPs. ... Peter Andrew Stewart Milliken, MP, BA , MA , LL.B (born November 12, 1946) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ...


As reported by the Toronto Star on November 29, 2005, "MacKay has recently been linked to the daughter of another dynasty — Sophie Desmarais, whose father is Paul Desmarais from Power Corp." Paul Desmarais, Sr. ... Power Corporation is a major Canadian company with interests in a number of industries, such as media, pulp and paper, and finance. ...


By September, 2006, MacKay's romantic life was once again in the papers, with the New York Times reporting on gossip about his involvement with United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice[5][6] Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ...


MacKay had his driver's licence suspended for two weeks starting May 21, 2005 after being caught speeding twice on November 11 and December 23 of 2004. is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In his spare time, MacKay has served on volunteer boards including New Leaf and Tearmann House. He has also been active in Big Brothers-Big Sisters, the Pictou County Senior Rugby Club and the YMCA. Big Brothers Big Sisters of America was founded in 1904 as New York Big Brothers by Ernest Coulter, who was influenced by Julius Mayer, a judge in the New York Childrens Court. ... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ...


A sports enthusiast, MacKay is active in local adult rugby, baseball, football and hockey teams in Pictou, Nova Scotia. Pictou is a Canadian town on the northern coast of Pictou County, Nova Scotia. ...


Government

Peter MacKay arrives at Rideau Hall to be sworn in as Minister of Foreign Affairs.
Peter MacKay arrives at Rideau Hall to be sworn in as Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Following the Conservative victory in the 2006 election, Prime Minister Stephen Harper named MacKay as Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; he was also tasked to be the political minister for both his home province, and for neighbouring Prince Edward Island, just as his father Elmer had done between 1988 and 1993. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (984x890, 340 KB) Peter MacKay arrives for the swearing in of the new conservative government on February 6, 2006 at Rideau Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (984x890, 340 KB) Peter MacKay arrives for the swearing in of the new conservative government on February 6, 2006 at Rideau Hall. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Patricia Espinosa Cantellano (b. ... Rendition of party representation in the 39th Canadian parliament decided by this election. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister that helps to form foreign policy for sovereign nations. ... The Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency is the member of the Cabinet of Canada who also serves as the chief executive of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA). ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Elmer MacIntosh MacKay, PC , QC , BA , LL.B (born August 5, 1936) is a retired Canadian politician. ...


During the first mandate, his biggest issue was the Lebanon-Israel-Hezbollah crisis that occurred in July 2006. The government decided to evacuate thousands of Canadians from Lebanon to safer locations and many back to Canada. MacKay responded to critics saying that the process was slow, that the boats (those which were used to evacuate) had limited capacity. MacKay's statements in support of the Israeli during the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict created a national debate in Canada, especially among Arabs and Muslim Canadians who opposed MacKay's position. During this period MacKay and the Conservative Party of Canada joined the Bush Administration in opposing the United Nation's call for a ceasefire. MacKay also referred to the popular Lebanese resistance movement Hezbollah as a "cancer" in Lebanon during this period. For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13... Combatants Hezbollah Amal LCP  Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General of Hezbollah) Imad Mughniyeh (Commander of Hezbollahs armed wing)[5] Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[12] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 600-1,000 active fighters 3,000-10,000 reservists[6] 30,000 ground troops (plus IAF & ISC)[13... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ...


On August 14, 2007, Stephen Harper shuffled MacKay from Foreign Affairs to Defence, replacing Gordon O'Connor. Gordon James OConnor, PC, OMM, CD, BA, B.Sc. ...


Quotes

  • "We're going to go after the Hells Angels, not Ducks Unlimited." (On the Conservative Party crime platform during the 2006 election campaign).
  • "I've been called treacherous, venal, stupid, lazy. . . and that's just from the Tories!"[7]
  • "I think I'll go home and walk my dog. . . at least dogs are loyal." (On how he will cope with his recent break up with Belinda Stronach)
  • (when asked the solution to critical comments from Alberta Premier Ralph Klein) "Duct tape."
  • "This isn't the 15th century. You can't go around the world and just plant flags and say 'We're claiming this territory'" in response to Russia's flag planting on the North Pole.

Ralph Phillip Klein (born November 1, 1942) was the premier of the Canadian province of Alberta and leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives from 1992 until his retirement in 2006. ... Desktop Wallpaper from the ECMA website with the ECMA logo. ... Motto: E Mari Merces(Latin) From the Sea, Wealth Coordinates: , Country Canada Province Nova Scotia Established April 1, 1996 Government  - Type Regional Municipality  - Mayor Peter Kelly  - Governing body Halifax Regional Council  - MPs List of MPs Alexa McDonough Geoff Regan Michael Savage Peter Stoffer (Bill Casey) (Gerald Keddy) (Peter MacKay)  - MLAs... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English, Canadian Gaelic Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ CTV News, October 2, 2006, MacKay was 'furious' at Stronach defection: author
  3. ^ "MacKay denies referring to Stronach as a dog", CBC News, 2006-10-19. Retrieved on 2006-10-20. 
  4. ^ [2].
  5. ^ New York Times, 13 September 2006,Dance of Diplomacy is Grist for the Gossip Mill
  6. ^ Toronto Star, 13 September 2006, 'This has been a lovely trip, Peter'
  7. ^ [3]

This article is about the Broadcast Television Network CTV, for the broadcasting television company see CTVglobemedia. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Toronto Star is Canadas highest-circulation newspaper, though its print edition is distributed almost entirely within Ontario. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Peter MacKay
Wikinews has related news:
Condoleezza Rice makes visit to Nova Scotia
  • Official site
  • CBC News coverage of MacKay's PC Leadership Campaign and convention speech
  • Parliament of Canada webpage
28th Ministry - Government of Stephen Harper
Cabinet Posts (3)
Predecessor Office Successor
Gordon O'Connor Minister of Defence
(from 14-Aug-2007)
Incumbent
Joe McGuire Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
(from 6-Feb-2006)
Incumbent
Pierre Pettigrew Minister of Foreign Affairs
(2006–2007)
Maxime Bernier
Political offices
Preceded by
Joe Clark
Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada
2003
Succeeded by
John Lynch-Staunton
(as Leader of the Conservative Party)
Parliament of Canada
Preceded by
District created in 1996. See Central Nova and Cape Breton Highlands—Canso
Members of Parliament from Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough
1997-2004
Succeeded by
district abolished
Preceded by
District created in 2003
Members of Parliament from Central Nova
2004-present
Succeeded by
incumbent
Conservative Maple Leaf Logo

Leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada and its antecedents Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The federal Canadian Cabinet of Prime Minister Stephen Harper was sworn in on February 6, 2006, exactly two weeks after the 2006 election, and nine weeks and six days after the fall of the 38th Canadian Parliament. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Gordon James OConnor, PC, OMM, CD, BA, B.Sc. ... The Minister of National Defence (French: Ministre de la Défense nationale) is the Canadian politician within the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the Department of National Defence which oversees the Canadian Forces. ... The Honourable Joseph McGuire The Honourable Joseph Blair Joe McGuire, PC , MP (born June 20, 1944) is a Canadian politician. ... The Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency is the member of the Cabinet of Canada who also serves as the chief executive of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA). ... Pierre Stewart Pettigrew, PC, (born in Quebec City on April 18, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... The Minister of Foreign Affairs (French: Ministre des Affaires étrangères) is the Minister of the Crown in the Canadian Cabinet who is responsible for overseeing the federal governments international relations section of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. ... Maxime Bernier, PC is Canadas Minister of Industry. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Honourable John Lynch-Staunton (born June 19, 1930 in Montreal) is a former Canadian senator and was the first leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Regions Political culture Foreign relations Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Senate Chamber of Parliament Hill in Ottawa. ... Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ... Cape Breton Highlands—Canso was a former federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Nova Scotia. ... Pictou—Antigonish—Guysborough was a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Central Nova in relation to the other Nova Scotia ridings Central Nova is a federal electoral district in Nova Scotia, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 2004. ... The Cabinet of Canada plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Ronalee Rona Ambrose, PC, BA, MA, MP (born March 15, 1969 in Valleyview, Alberta) is Canadas current Minister of the Environment. ... John Russell Baird, PC, MP (born May 26, 1969) is a Canadian politician. ... Maxime Bernier, PC is Canadas Minister of Industry. ... Jean-Pierre Blackburn (born July 6, 1948 in Jonquière, Quebec) is a Canadian politician. ... Hon. ... Anthony Peter Tony Clement, PC, BA, LL.B., MP (born January 27, 1961 in Manchester, England) is a Canadian politician, federal Minister of Health, Minister for the Federal Economic Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor) and member of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Stockwell Burt Day Jr. ... David Lee Emerson, PC, Ph. ... Diane Finley PC, MP (born October 3, 1958 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ... James Michael Jim Flaherty, PC, BA, LL.B, MP (born December 30, 1949) is Canadas Minister of Finance; he had formerly served as Ontarios Minister of Finance. ... Michael M. Fortier, PC (born January 10, 1962) is the Canadian Minister of Public Works and Government Services and a Conservative senator from Quebec. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Hon. ... Marjory LeBreton, P.C. (born July 4, 1940) is a Canadian Senator and vice-chair of Mothers Against Drunk Driving in Canada. ... Hon. ... For the musician, better known as Blasko, see Rob Nicholson (musician). ... Gordon James OConnor, PC, OMM, CD, BA, B.Sc. ... Hon. ... P. E. James Jim Prentice, PC, MP (born July 20, 1956, in South Porcupine, Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ... Gerry Ritz (born August 19, 1951) is a Canadian Member of Parliament for Battlefords—Lloydminster, a largely rural riding in Saskatchewan. ... Monte Kenton Solberg PC, MP (born September 17, 1958 in Calgary, Alberta) is a Canadian Member of Parliament, representing the riding of Medicine Hat in the Canadian House of Commons as a member of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... Charles Strahl, PC, MP (born February 25, 1957 in New Westminster, British Columbia) is a politician in British Columbia, Canada. ... Gregory Francis Thompson (born March 28, 1947 in St. ... Victor Vic Toews, PC, MP [teıvz] (born September 10, 1952) is a Canadian politician. ... Peter Van Loan, PC, MP (born April 18, 1963) (sometimes referred to as PVL) is a Canadian politician. ... Josée Verner is a Canadian politician. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Conservative_maple_leaf,_blue. ... This a list of leaders of the Conservative Party of Canada (historical) (1867-1942), Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-2003), and Conservative Party of Canada (2003-) (the Tory parties), and of Prime Ministers of Canada after Confederation who were members of those parties. ...

Liberal-Conservative/Conservative/Unionist/N.L.C./National Government/Progressive Conservative (1867-2003): Macdonald | Abbott | Thompson | Bowell | Tupper | Borden | Meighen | Bennett | Manion | Meighen | Bracken | Drew | Diefenbaker | Stanfield | Clark | Mulroney | Campbell | Charest | Clark | MacKay

Reform (1987-2000)/Canadian Alliance (2000-2003): Manning | Day | Harper
The Liberal-Conservative Party was the formal name of the Conservative Party of Canada until 1873, although some Conservative candidates continued to run under the label as late as the 1911 election and others ran as simple Conservatives prior to 1873. ... The Conservative Party of Canada has gone by a variety of names over the years since Canadian Confederation. ... The Unionist Party was formed in 1917 by Members of Parliament (MPs) in Canada who supported the Union government formed by Sir Robert Borden during World War I. In May 1917, Conservative Prime Minister Borden proposed the formation of a national unity government or coalition government to Liberal leader Sir... The National Liberal and Conservative Party was the name adopted by the Canadian Conservatives in 1920 after the end of the Unionist government of Robert Borden. ... National Government was the name used by the Conservative Party of Canada for the 1940 federal election under leader Robert Manion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named John Alexander Macdonald, see John Alexander Macdonald (disambiguation). ... The Hon. ... Sir John Sparrow David Thompson, KCMG, PC, QC, (November 10, 1845 – December 12, 1894) was a Canadian lawyer and judge who served as the fourth Prime Minister of Canada from December 5, 1892 to December 12, 1894 as well as Premier of Nova Scotia in 1882. ... Sir Mackenzie Bowell, PC , KCMG (December 27, 1823 – December 10, 1917) was the fifth Prime Minister of Canada from December 21, 1894 to April 27, 1896. ... Not to be confused with Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper who was Sir Charles Tuppers son. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC, GCMG, KC, DCL, LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... Richard Bedford Bennett, 1st Viscount Bennett, PC, KC (July 3, 1870 – June 26, 1947) was the eleventh Prime Minister of Canada from August 7, 1930 to October 23, 1935. ... Robert James Manion (November 19, 1881 Pembroke, Ontario - July 2, 1943 Ottawa, Ontario) was a physician and Canadian politician. ... Arthur Meighen, PC, QC, BA, LL.D (June 16, 1874 – August 5, 1960) was the ninth Prime Minister of Canada from July 10, 1920 to December 29, 1921 and June 29 to September 25, 1926. ... The Honourable Professor John Bracken, PC (June 22, 1883-March 18, 1969) was an agronomist, Premier of Manitoba (1922-1943) and leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (1942-1948). ... Colonel The Honourable George Alexander Drew, PC , CC , QC (May 7, 1894 - January 4, 1973) was a Canadian conservative politician who founded a Progressive Conservative dynasty in Ontario that lasted 42 years. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH, PC, QC, BA, MA, LL.B, LL.D, DCL, FRSC, FRSA, D.Litt, DSL, (18 September 1895 – 16 August 1979) was the 13th Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... Robert Lorne Stanfield, PC, QC (April 11, 1914–December 16, 2003) was Premier of Nova Scotia and leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993 and was leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada from 1983 to 1993. ... This article is about the former Canadian Prime Minster. ... John James Charest, PC, LL.B., MNA, known as Jean Charest IPA: (born June 24, 1958) is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark, PC, CC, AOE, MA, LLD (born June 5, 1939) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada, from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party that existed from 1987 to 2000. ... The Canadian Alliance, formally the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance, was a Canadian conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... Ernest Preston Manning (born June 10, 1942, in Edmonton, Alberta), is a right-wing populist Canadian politician. ... Stockwell Burt Day Jr. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Conservative (new) (2003-present): Harper The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Stephen Joseph Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ...


Nova Scotia Caucus serving in the 39th Canadian Parliament.
Senators Gerald J. Comeau (Con), Jane Cordy (Lib), Jim Cowan (Lib), Terry Mercer (Lib), Wilfred Moore (Lib), Donald Oliver (Con), Gerard Phalen (Lib)
Members of Parliament Scott Brison (Lib), Bill Casey (Ind), Rodger Cuzner (Lib), Mark Eyking (Lib), Gerald Keddy (Con), Peter MacKay (Con), Alexa McDonough (NDP), Geoff Regan (Lib), Michael Savage (Lib), Peter Stoffer (NDP), Robert Thibault (Lib)
Persondata
NAME MacKay, Peter Gordon
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Canadian politician
DATE OF BIRTH September 27, 1965
PLACE OF BIRTH New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Canada
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Peter MacKay (166 words)
Peter MacKay (born September 27, 1965) is the leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada.
MacKay was born in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, the son of PC cabinet minister Elmer MacKay[?].
Mackay promised a revue of the NAFTA free=trade agreement, and also promised that no deal would be made to split up Canada between the tories and Canadian Alliance.
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