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Encyclopedia > Peter Bogdanovich
Peter Bogdanovich
Born July 30, 1939 (1939-07-30) (age 68)
Kingston, New York
Spouse(s) Polly Platt (1966-1970)
Louise Stratten (1988-2001)
Partner(s) Cybill Shepherd (1971-1978)

Peter Bogdanovich Serbian Cyrillic Петар Богдановић (born July 30, 1939) is a Serbian-American film director, writer and actor. He was part of the wave of "New Hollywood" directors (which included William Friedkin, Brian DePalma, George Lucas, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Michael Cimino and Francis Ford Coppola, among others), and was particularly relevant during the 1970s with his film The Last Picture Show. is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kingston is a city in Ulster County, New York, United States. ... Polly Platt is an American film producer, production designer and screenwriter. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... 1982 - Missing - Costa-Gavras Donald Stewart E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial - Melissa Mathison Gandhi - John Briley On Golden Pond - Ernest Thompson 1981 - Gregorys Girl - Bill Forsyth Atlantic City - John Guare Chariots of Fire - Colin Welland The French Lieutenants Woman - Harold Pinter 1980 - Being There - Jerzy Kosinski Airplane! - Jim... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ... Serbian Cyrillic is the Serbian variant of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... Brian De Palma (born September 11, 1940 in Newark, New Jersey) is an American film director. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Michael Cimino (born February 3, 1939, New York City) is an Australia film director. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ...

Contents

Early life

The son of immigrants fleeing the Nazis -- his father is a Serbian painter and pianist and his mother descended from a rich Austrian Jewish family -- Bogdanovich was conceived in Europe but born in America. He was originally an actor in the 1950s, studying his craft with acting teacher Stella Adler (he was only 16 but had to lie about his age and say he was 18 to qualify), and appearing on television and in summer stock. In the early 1960s, Bogdanovich achieved notoriety programming movies at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. An obsessive cinema-goer, sometimes seeing up to 400 movies a year in his youth, Bogdanovich prominently showcased the work of American directors such as John Ford, whom he subsequently wrote a book about based on the notes he had produced for the MoMA retrospective of the director, and the then-underappreciated Howard Hawks. Bogdanovich also brought attention to such forgotten pioneers of American cinema as Allan Dwan. National Socialism redirects here. ... Anthem Serbia() on the European continent() Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Official languages Serbian 1 Recognised regional languages Hungarian, Croatian, Slovak, Romanian, Rusyn 2 Albanian 3 Government Semi-presidential republic  -  President Boris Tadić  -  Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica Establishment  -  Formation 812   -  Kingdom established 1217   -  Empire established 1346   -  Independence lost to... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Stella Adler (February 10, 1901 – December 21, 1992) was an American actress, and for decades was regarded as Americas foremost acting teacher. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... Howard Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Allan Dwan (April 3, 1885 – December 21, 1981) was a pioneering Canadian-born American motion picture director, producer and screenwriter. ...


Bogdanovich was influenced by the French critics of the 1950s who wrote for Cahiers du Cinéma, especially critic-turned-director François Truffaut. Before becoming a director himself, he built his reputation as a film writer with articles in Esquire. In 1968, following the example of Cahiers du Cinéma critics Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Claude Chabrol, and Éric Rohmer who had created the Nouvelle Vague ("New Wave") by making their own films, Bogdanovich decided to become a director. With his wife Polly Platt in tow, they packed their bags, took a grocery carriage full of books and loaded them into their car and headed for Los Angeles, skipping out on their rent in the process. Intent on getting into the industry, Bogdanovich's persistence paid off when he would bug publicists for movie premiere and industry party invites. At one screening, Bogdanovich was viewing a film with film director Roger Corman sitting behind him. The two struck up a conversation when Corman mentioned he liked a cinema piece Bogdanovich wrote for Esquire. It was in this conversation that Corman offered him a directing job which Bogdanovich didn't even blink before accepting. He went on to work with Corman on Targets and Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women. Bogdanovich later said of the Corman school of filmmaking, "I went from getting the laundry to directing the picture in three weeks. Altogether, I worked 22 weeks – preproduction, shooting, second unit, cutting, dubbing – I haven't learned as much since."[1] Cahiers du cinéma is an influential French film magazine founded in 1951 by André Bazin, Jacques Doniol-Valcroze and Joseph-Marie Lo Duca. ... François Roland Truffaut (French IPA: ) (February 6, 1932 – October 21, 1984) was one of the founders of the French New Wave in filmmaking, and remains an icon of the French film industry. ... August 2005 issue of Esquire Esquire is a mens magazine by the Hearst Corporation. ... Cahiers du cinéma is an influential French film magazine founded in 1951 by André Bazin, Jacques Doniol-Valcroze and Joseph-Marie Lo Duca. ... Jean-Luc Godard (French IPA: ) (born 3 December 1930) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born to Franco-Swiss parents in Paris, he was educated in Nyon, Switzerland, later studying at the Lycée Rohmer, and the... Claude Chabrol (French IPA: ) (born June 24, 1930, Paris) is a French film director and has become well-known since his first film, Le Beau Serge (1958) for his chilling tales of murder, including Le Boucher (1970). ... Éric Rohmer (born Jean-Marie Maurice Scherer, April 4, 1920, Nancy, France) is a French film director and screenwriter. ... The New Wave (French: Nouvelle vague) of French cinema was a cinematic movement of the 1960s. ... Polly Platt is an American film producer, production designer and screenwriter. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Roger Corman Roger William Corman (born April 5, 1926), sometimes nicknamed King of the Bs for his output of B-movies (though he himself rejects this appelation as inaccurate), is a prolific American producer and director of low-budget exploitation movies. ... Targets (1968) is a film written, produced and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women is a 1968 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ...


Turning back to journalism, Bogdanovich struck up a life-long friendship with Orson Welles while interviewing him on the set of Mike Nichols's Catch-22. Bogdanovich played a major role in elucidating Welles and his career with his writings on the actor-director, most notably his book This is Orson Welles (1992). In the early-70s when Welles was having financial problems, Bogdanovich let him stay at his Bel Air mansion for a couple of years. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Catch-22 is a 1970 film, adapted from the book of the same name by Joseph Heller. ...


In 1970, Bogdanovich was commissioned by the American Film Institute to direct a documentary about John Ford for a tribute, Directed by John Ford. The resulting film is considered a classic Hollywood profile documentary. It included candid interviews with the likes of John Wayne, James Stewart, Henry Fonda, and was narrated by Orson Welles. Out of circulation for years due to licensing issues, Bogdanovich and TCM released it in 2006, featuring newer, pristine film clips, and additional interviews with Clint Eastwood, Walter Hill, Harry Carey, Jr., Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, and others. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Henry Jaynes Fonda (May 16, 1905 – August 12, 1982) was a highly acclaimed Academy Award-winning American film actor, best known for his roles as plain-speaking idealists. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Clint Eastwood (born Clinton Eastwood, Jr. ... Walter Hill (born California 1942) is a prominent American film director. ... Harry Carey, Jr. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, writer and producer and founder of the World Cinema Foundation. ... Steven Allan Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...


Eruption into Stardom

The 32-year old Bogdanovich was hailed by a critics as a "Wellesian" wunderkind when his best known film, The Last Picture Show, was released in 1971. The film received eight Academy Awards nominations, including Best Director, and won two statues: Cloris Leachman and Ben Johnson in the supporting acting categories. Bogdanovich, who had cast the 19-year-old model Cybill Shepherd in a major role in the film, fell in love with her, an affair that eventually led to his divorce from Polly Platt, his long-time artistic collaborator and the mother of his two children. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Cloris Leachman (born April 30, 1926) is an Academy Award, nine-time Emmy and Golden Globe winning American actress of stage, film and television. ... There have been several people called Ben Johnson or Jonson: Ben Jonson (1572-1637; Elizabethan dramatist, poet & actor) Ben Johnson (c. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Bogdanovich followed up The Last Picture Show with the popular hit What's Up, Doc? (1972), a screwball comedy indebted to Hawks' Bringing Up Baby (1937) and His Girl Friday (1941), starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O'Neal. Despite his reliance on homage to bygone cinema, Bogdanovich had solidified his status as one of a new breed of A-list directors that included Academy Award winners Francis Ford Coppola and William Friedkin, with whom he formed The Directors Company. The Directors Company was a generous production deal with Paramount Pictures that essentially gave the directors carte blanche if they kept within budget limitations. It was through this entity that Bogdanovich's Paper Moon (1973) was produced. Whats Up, Doc? is a screwball comedy from 1972, directed by Peter Bogdanovich and starring Barbra Streisand, Ryan ONeal, and Madeline Kahn (in her first full-length film role). ... The screwball comedy has proven to be one of the most elusive of the film genres. ... Bringing up Baby is a 1938 screwball comedy which tells the story of a scientist who winds up in various predicaments with a woman who has a unique sense of logic and a leopard named Baby. ... His Girl Friday is a 1940 screwball comedy, a remake of the 1931 film The Front Page, itself an adaptation by Charles Lederer, Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur of their play of the same name. ... Barbra Joan Streisand (born April 24, 1942) is an American singer, theatre and film actress, composer, liberal political activist, film producer and director. ... Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Francis Ford Coppola (born April 7, 1939) is a five-time Academy Award winning American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ...


Paper Moon, a Depression-era comedy starring Ryan O'Neal that won his 10-year-old daughter Tatum O'Neal an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress, proved to be the high-water mark of Bogdanovich's career. Forced to share the profits with his fellow directors, Bogdanovich became dissatisfied with the arrangement. The Directors Company subsequently produced only two more pictures, Coppola's The Conversation (1974), which was nominated for Best Picture in 1974 alongside The Godfather, Part II (1974), and Bogdanovich's Daisy Miller, a film that had a lackluster critical reception. For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Tatum Beatrice ONeal (born November 5, 1963 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-winning American actress best known for her film work as a child actress in the 1970s. ... The Conversation is an Academy Award nominated 1974 mystery thriller about audio surveillance, written and directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Gene Hackman, John Cazale, Teri Garr, and Cindy Williams; it also features an early performance by Harrison Ford and an uncredited appearance from Robert Duvall. ... Al Pacino as Don Michael Corleone in The Godfather Part II The Godfather, Part II is the 1974 sequel to The Godfather. ...


Commercial Demise

An adaptation of the Henry James novella, Daisy Miller (1974) spelled the beginning of the end of Bogdanovich's career as a popular, critically acclaimed director. The film, which starred Bogdanovich's lover Shepherd as the title character, was savaged by critics and was a flop at the box office. Bogdanovich's follow-up, an original screenplay (set to the music of Cole Porter), At Long Last Love (1975) starring Shepherd, was panned by critics as one of the worst films ever made and noted as such in Harry and Michael Medved's The Golden Turkey Awards: Nominees and Winners, the Worst Achievements in Hollywood History (1980). The film also was a box office bomb despite featuring Burt Reynolds, whose star would only rise during the 1970s. For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Daisy Miller is an 1878 novella by Henry James. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... At Long Last Love is an American motion picture musical that was released in 1975 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Michael Medved (born October 3, 1948) is a Jewish-American, neoconservative radio talk show host, film critic, and author. ... Burt Reynolds (born Burton Reynolds Jr. ...


Once again beholden to the past, Bogdanovich insisted on filming the musical numbers for At Long Last Love live, a process not used since the early days of the talkies. The decision was widely ridiculed as none of the leading actors were known for their singing abilities. (Bogdanovich himself had produced a critically panned album of Shepherd singing Porter songs in 1974.) The public perception of Bogdanovich became that of an arrogant director hamstrung by his own hubris.


Bogdanovich turned back again to old triumphs and traditions with Nickelodeon (1976). Nickelodeon, a comedy recounting the earliest days of the motion picture industry and reuniting Paper Moon's Ryan and Tatum O'Neal with Reynolds. Counseled not to use the critically unpopular Shepherd in the film, Bogdanovich instead used newcomer Jane Hitchcock as the film's ingénue. Unfortunately, the magic of Paper Moon could not be repeated and the film died at the box office. Nickelodeon Movies is the company where in Nickelodeon Nicktoons,such asSpongebob Squarepants and Rugrats and other original live-action ideas are turned into movies. ...


The Dorothy Stratten Affair

After a three-year hiatus, Bogdanovich returned with the critically and financially underwhelming Saint Jack (1979) for Hugh Hefner's Playboy Productions Inc. Bogdanovich's long affair with Shepherd had ended in 1978, but the production deal making Hefner the film's producer was part of the settlement of a lawsuit Shepherd had filed against Hefner for publishing nude photos of her pirated from a print of The Last Picture Show in Playboy Magazine. Bogdanovich then launched the film that would be his career Waterloo, They All Laughed, a low-budget ensemble comedy starring Audrey Hepburn and the 20 year-old Playboy Playmate of the Year Dorothy Stratten. During the filming of the picture, Bogdanovich fell in love with Stratten, who was married to Paul Snider. Stratten moved in with Bogdanovich, and when she told Snider she was leaving him, she was killed in a murder-suicide. Saint Jack is a 1973 fictional book by Paul Theroux and a 1979 film of the same name. ... Hugh Marston Hefner (born April 9, 1926 in Chicago, Illinois), also referred to colloquially as Hef, is the founder and editor-in-chief of Playboy magazine. ... Playboy is an adult entertainment magazine, or pornography magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... They All Laughed is a 1981 movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Audrey Hepburn (4 May 1929 - 20 January 1993) was an Academy Award and Tony Award winning Anglo-Dutch actress of film and theatre, Broadway stage performer, ballerina, fashion model, and humanitarian. ... A Playmate is a female model featured in Playboy magazine as Playmate of the Month. ... Dorothy Stratten (born Dorothy Ruth Hoogstraten) (February 28, 1960 – August 14, 1980) was a Canadian model and actress. ... Paul Leslie Snider (April 15, 1951 – August 14, 1980) was the estranged husband of Playboy model Dorothy Stratten. ... A murder suicide is an act in which an individual kills one or more other persons immediately before, or while killing himself. ...


They All Laughed could not attract a distributor due to the negative publicity surrounding the Stratten murder, despite its being one of the few films made by the legendary Audrey Hepburn after her provisional retirement in 1967. The heartbroken Bogdanovich bought the rights to the negative so that it would be seen by the public, but the film had a limited release to weak reviews and lost Bogdanovich millions, driving him into bankruptcy. Apart from the tragic circumstances of its making, though, the film has a small but devoted following. Director Quentin Tarantino listed it as one of the Ten Best Films of All Time in the 2002 Sight and Sound poll. Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Oscar winning screenwriter. ...


Later Years

Bogdanovich turned back to writing as his directorial career sagged, beginning with memoir of his dead love, The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten (1960–1980) that was published in 1984. Teresa Carpenter's "Death of a Playmate" article about Stratten's murder had been published in The Village Voice, and had won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize. While Bogdanovich never criticized Carpenter's article in his book, she had lambasted Bogdanovich and Hefner, claiming that Stratten was as much a victim of them as she was of Snider. In particular she criticized Bogdanovich for his "puerile preference for ingenues." Carpenter's article served as the basis of Bob Fosse's film Star 80 (1983), in which Bogdanovich, for legal reasons, was portrayed as the fictional director "Aram Nicholas," a sympathetic but possibly misguided and naive character. This article is about a New York newspaper. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Bob Fosse, early promotional image Bob Fosse (June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987) was a musical theater choreographer and director. ... Star 80 is a 1983 film about the true story of Playboy playmate of the year Dorothy Stratten who was murdered by her estranged husband (Paul Snider) in 1980. ...


Though he achieved huge success with Mask in 1985, Bogdanovich's sequel to The Last Picture Show, Texasville (1990), was a critical and box office disappointment. Both films occasioned major disputes between Bogdanovich, who still demanded a measure of control over his films, and the studios, which now exerted control over the finance and final cut of both films. Mask was released with a song score by Bob Seger against Bogdanovich's wishes (he favored Bruce Springsteen), and Bogdanovich has often complained that the version of Texasville that was released was not the film he had intended to release. A director's cut of Mask, slightly longer and with the songs of Springsteen, was belatedly released on DVD in 2006. A director's cut of Texasville was released on laserdisc, though it has never been released on DVD. Around the time of the release of Texasville, Bogdanovich also re-visited his earliest success, The Last Picture Show, and produced a slightly modified director's cut. Since that time, his re-cut has been the only available version of the film. Mask is a 1985 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, starring Cher and Eric Stoltz. ... Texasville is an American motion picture. ...


Bogdanovich directed two more theatrical films in 1992 and 1993, but their failure kept him off the big screen for several years. One, Noises Off..., has subsequently developed a strong cult following, while the other, The Thing Called Love, is better known as one of actor River Phoenix's last roles before an untimely drug-related death. Noises Off. ... The Thing Called Love is a Peter Bogdanovich movie released in 1993. ... River Jude Phoenix (August 23, 1970 – October 31, 1993) was an Academy Award and Golden Globe- nominated American film actor. ...


Bogdanovich, drawing from his encyclopedic knowledge of film history, authored several critically lauded texts including Peter Bogdanovich's Movie of the Week, which offered the lifelong cinephile's erudite commentary on 52 of his favorite films, Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors, and Who the Hell's in It: Conversations with Hollywood's Legendary Actors. In 1997, the director entered bankruptcy protection once more and briefly moved in with friends in New York City.


In 2001, Bogdanovich resurfaced with The Cat's Meow. Returning once again to a reworking of the past, this time the supposed murder of director Thomas Ince by Welles' bête noire William Randolph Hearst, The Cat's Meow was a modest critical success but made little money at the box office. Bogdanovich says he heard the story of the alleged Ince murder from director Orson Welles who in turn said he heard it from writer Herman J. Mankiewicz. In addition to helming some television movies, Bogdanovich has returned to acting, with a recurring guest role on the cable television series The Sopranos as Dr. Melfi's psychotherapist. Bogdanovich directed a fifth season episode of the series. In an homage to his Sopranos character, he also voiced the analyst of Bart Simpson's therapist in an episode of The Simpsons. The Cats Meow is a 2001 American film released in 2002. ... Thomas Harper Ince (November 6, 1882–November 20, 1924) was an American film director. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Sopranos is an American television drama series created by David Chase and originally broadcast on the HBO network. ... This article is about a fictional character from The Sopranos. ... Yokel Chords is the fourteenth episode of the eighteenth season of The Simpsons, which originally aired on March 4, 2007. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


Bogdanovich's personal reputation suffered from gossip about his 13-year marriage to Dorothy Stratten's younger sister, Louise Hoogstraten, who was 29 years his junior. The marriage ended in divorce in 2001. Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...


In 1998, the National Film Preservation Board of the Library of Congress named The Last Picture Show to the National Film Registry, an honor awarded only to the most culturally significant films. The United States National Film Preservation Board is the board selecting films for preservation in the Library of Congress National Film Registry. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Bogdanovich hosted The Essentials on Turner Classic Movies but was replaced in May 2006 by TCM host Robert Osborne and film critic Molly Haskell. Bogdanovich is also frequently featured in introductions to movies on the famed Criterion Collection DVDs. He also had a supporting role as a fictional version of himself in the Showtime comedy series Out of Order. He will next appear in The Dream Factory. Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... Robert Joline Osborne is an American actor and film historian best known for his work as the host of the Turner Classic Movies network since its inception in 1994. ... Molly Haskell (born September 29, 1939 in Charlotte, North Carolina) is a feminist film critic. ... The Criterion Collection is a joint venture between Janus Films and The Voyager Company that was begun in the mid 1980s for the purpose of releasing authoritative consumer versions of classic and important contemporary films on the laserdisc and DVD formats. ... Out of Order is an American television dramedy series created and written by Donna Powers and Wayne Powers(Deep Blue Sea), whom also directed it. ...


In addition to his writing, directing and acting, Bogdanovich is in demand as a speaker for doing impeccable impressions of Hollywood legends whom he befriended over the years, among them Cary Grant, James Stewart, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and Jerry Lewis. This article is about the British actor. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 – April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For other persons named Jerry Lewis, see Jerry Lewis (disambiguation). ...


In 2006, Bogdanovich joined forces with ClickStar, where he hosts a classic movie channel, Peter Bogdanovich's Golden Age of Movies. Bodganovich also writes a blog for the site.


In 2007, Bogdanovich was presented with the 2007 award for outstanding contribution to film preservation by The International Federation of Film Archives at the Toronto International Film Festival.[2] The International Federation of Film Archives (FIAF) was founded in Paris in 1938. ... Poster for the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival Box office at the Manulife Centre The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), held in Toronto, Canada, is widely considered to be one of the top film festivals in the world. ...


Filmography

Targets (1968) is a film written, produced and directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women is a 1968 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... The Last Picture Show is a 1971 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, adapted from a 1966 novel by Larry McMurtry. ... Whats Up, Doc? is a screwball comedy from 1972, directed by Peter Bogdanovich and starring Barbra Streisand, Ryan ONeal, and Madeline Kahn (in her first full-length film role). ... Paper Moon is an American motion picture comedy that was released in 1973 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... At Long Last Love is an American motion picture musical that was released in 1975 and was directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Nickelodeon Movies is the company where in Nickelodeon Nicktoons,such asSpongebob Squarepants and Rugrats and other original live-action ideas are turned into movies. ... Saint Jack is a 1973 fictional book by Paul Theroux and a 1979 film of the same name. ... They All Laughed is a 1981 movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich. ... Mask is a 1985 film directed by Peter Bogdanovich, starring Cher and Eric Stoltz. ... Illegally Yours is a 1988 comedy film set in St. ... Texasville is an American motion picture. ... Noises Off is a 1982 British play by Michael Frayn. ... The Thing Called Love is a Peter Bogdanovich movie released in 1993. ... The Cats Meow is a 2001 American film released in 2002. ... Hustle is a TV movie about baseball player Pete Rose created by ESPN that first broadcast on September 25, 2004. ... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... The Sopranos is an American television drama series created by David Chase and originally broadcast on the HBO network. ... Infamous (Previously: Have You Heard?; and Every Word Is True USA working title) is a forthcoming film from Warner Independent Pictures, due to be released in September 2006. ...

Books

  • Peter Bogdanovich The Killing Of The Unicorn - Dorothy Stratten 1960-1980, William Morrow and Company 1984, ISBN 0-688-01611-1.
  • Peter Bogdanovich This Is Orson Welles, HarperPerennial 1992, ISBN 0-06-092439-X
  • Peter Bogdanovich Peter Bogdanovich's Movie of the Week
  • Peter Bogdanovich Who The Devil Made It: Conversations with Legendary Film Directors
  • Peter Bogdanovich Who the Hell's in It: Conversations with Hollywood's Legendary Actors

This Is Orson Welles is a 1992 book by Peter Bogdanovich and Orson Welles, two directors, one the legendary creator of Citizen Kane, the other a former journalist-turned-popular-moviemaker of The Last Picture Show fame. ...

References

  1. ^ "What They Learned From Roger Corman", by Beverly Gray, Moviemaker Magazine, Spring 2001, retrieved April 29, 2006
  2. ^ "TIFF '07 - Films & Schedules La Grand Illusion:", by Sylvia Frank, Toronto International Film Festival Guide, September 2007, retrieved September 09, 2007

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Peter Bogdanovich - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1787 words)
Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30, 1939) is an American film director and writer, born in Kingston, New York.
Bogdanovich, who had cast the 19-year-old model Cybill Shepherd in a major role in the film, fell in love with the young beauty, an affair that eventually led to his divorce from the film's set-designer Polly Platt, his long-time artistic collaborator and the mother of his two children.
Bogdanovich's career follow-up, a film of the Cole Porter musical At Long Last Love (1975) starring Shepherd, was acclaimed by critics as one of the worst films ever made, noted as such in Harry and Michael Medved's The Golden Turkey Awards: Nominees and Winners, the Worst Achievements in Hollywood History (1980).
Peter Bogdanovich - definition of Peter Bogdanovich in Encyclopedia (228 words)
Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30 1939) is an American film director, born in Kingston, New York.
Bogdanovich has also done some acting: he was a principal supporting character in his first feature, and most recently had a recurring guest role on the television series The Sopranos as Dr.
Bogdanovich was later married to Stratten's sister Louise from 1988 to 2001.
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