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Encyclopedia > Peter Annet

Peter Annet (1693-1769), English deist, is said to have been born at Liverpool. A schoolmaster by profession, he became prominent owing to his attacks on orthodox theologians, as well as for his membership of a semi-theological debating society, the Robin Hood Society, which met at the Robin Hood and Little John at Butcher Row. Annet was very hostile to the clergy and to scripture, being a thoroughgoing deist in every way. He distinguished himself by being extremely critical of the character and reputation of King David and the Apostle Paul. In 1739 he wrote and published a pamphlet, Judging for Ourselves, or Freethinking the Great Duty of Religion, a strong criticism of Christianity. For writing this and similar pamphlets, he lost his teaching position. Historical and modern deism is defined by the view that reason, rather than revelation or tradition, should be the basis of belief in God. ... Liverpool waterfront by night, as seen from the Wirral. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... Saul, also known as Paul, Paulus, and Saint Paul the Apostle, (AD 3–67) is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Judea. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, known by Christians as Jesus Christ, and the New Testament accounts of his life, teachings, and actions. ...


To him has also been attributed a work called A History of the Man after God's own Heart (1761). King George II was insulted by a current comparison with King David. The book is said to have inspired Voltaire's Saul. It is also attributed to one John Noorthouck (Noorthook). George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... The last of Voltaires statues by Jean-Antoine Houdon (1781). ...


In 1763 he was condemned for blasphemous libel in his paper called the Free Inquirer. After his release he kept a small school in Lambeth, one of his pupils being James Stephen (1758-1832), who became master in Chancery. At age 68, Annet was sentenced to the pillory and a year's hard labor. He died on the 18th of January 1769. In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... Lambeth is a place in the London Borough of Lambeth. ... James Stephen (30 June 1758-10 October 1832) was an English lawyer, associated with the abolitionist movement. ... Court of Chancery, London, late 18th century The Court of Chancery was one of the courts of equity in England and Wales. ... It has been suggested that Pranger be merged into this article or section. ...


When the Christian apologists substituted for the argument from miracles the argument from personal witness and the credibility of Biblical evidence, Annet, in his Resurrection of Jesus (1744), assailed the validity of such evidence, and first advanced the hypothesis of the illusory death of Jesus, suggesting also that possibly Paul should be regarded as the founder of a new religion. In Supernaturals Examined (1747) Annet roundly denies the possibility of miracles. The Bible (Hebrew: תנ״ך tanakh, Greek: η Βίβλος hē biblos) (sometimes The Holy Bible, The Book, Word of God, The Word Scripture, Scripture), from Greek (τα) βίβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, is the name used by Jews and Christians for their (differing but overlapping) canons of sacred texts. ... Jesus (8-2 BC/BCE– 29-36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... Saul, also known as Paul, Paulus, and Saint Paul the Apostle, (AD 3–67) is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Judea. ...


Annet stands between the earlier philosophic deists and the later propagandists of Thomas Paine's school, and seems go have been the first freethought lecturer (J. M. Robertson); his essays, A Collection of the Tracts of a certain Free Enquirer, are forcible but lack refinement. He invented a system of shorthand (2nd ed., with a copy of verses by Joseph Priestley). Thomas Paine Thomas Paine (January 29, 1737 – June 8, 1809), intellectual, scholar, revolutionary, deist and idealist, is widely recognized as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Joseph Priestley is often credited for the discovery of oxygen. ...


References

  • Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Peter Annet - LoveToKnow 1911 (221 words)
PETER ANNET (1693-1769), English deist, is said to have been born at Liverpool.
A schoolmaster by profession, he became prominent owing to his attacks on orthodox theologians, and his membership of a semi-theological debating society, the Robin Hood Society, which met at the "Robin Hood and Little John" in Butcher Row.
Annet died on the 18th of January 1769.
Peter Annet Summary (868 words)
Peter Annet, an English freethinker and deist, was by profession a schoolmaster.
Annet was long thought to have been the author of The History of the Man after God's Own Heart (1761), in which the writer took exception to a parallel drawn by a divine between George II and King David.
Annet stands between the earlier philosophic deists and the later propagandists of Thomas Paine's school, and seems go have been the first freethought lecturer (J. Robertson); his essays, A Collection of the Tracts of a certain Free Enquirer, are forcible but lack refinement.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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