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Encyclopedia > Pete Seeger
Pete Seeger
Seeger ca. 1955
Seeger ca. 1955
Background information
Born May 3, 1919 (1919-05-03) (age 88)
Origin Greenwich Village
Genre(s) Folk
Occupation(s) Activist, songwriter
Years active 1940-present
Associated acts The Weavers,The Almanac Singers,Woody Guthrie

Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), better known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and a key figure in the mid-20th century American folk music revival. As a member of the Weavers, he had a string of hits, including a 1949 recording of Leadbelly's "Goodnight Irene" that topped the charts for 13 weeks in 1950.[1] However, his career as a mainstream performer was seriously curtailed by the Second Red Scare: he came under severe attack as a former member of the Communist Party of the United States of America. Later, he re-emerged on the public scene as a pioneer of protest music in the late 1950s and the 1960s. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2235x2585, 508 KB) High resolution version from http://memory. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action or inaction to bring about social or political change. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... The Almanac Singers were a group of folk musicians who achieved brief popularity in the early 1940s. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... The American folk music revival was a phenomenon in the United States in the 1950s to mid-1960s. ... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... Leadbelly, also known as Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 20, 1889 (although this is debatable) - December 6, 1949), was an American folk and blues musician, notable for his clear and forceful singing, his virtuosity on the twelve string guitar, and the rich songbook of folk standards he introduced. ... Goodnight Irene, or Irene, is an American folk standard. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... A protest song is a song which protests perceived problems in society. ...


He is perhaps best known today as the author or co-author of the songs "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?", "If I Had a Hammer (The Hammer Song)", and "Turn, Turn, Turn!", which have been recorded by many artists both in and outside the folk revival movement and are still sung throughout the world. "Flowers" was a hit recording for The Kingston Trio (1962), Marlene Dietrich, who recorded it in English, German and French (1962), and Johnny Rivers (1965). "If I Had a Hammer" was a hit for Peter, Paul & Mary (1962) and Trini Lopez (1963), while The Byrds popularized "Turn, Turn, Turn!" in the mid-1960s. Seeger is also widely credited with popularizing the traditional song "We Shall Overcome", which was recorded by Joan Baez and many other singer-activists, and became the publicly perceived anthem of the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement soon after musicologist Guy Carawan introduced it at the founding meeting of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960. Where Have All the Flowers Gone? is a folk song of the 1960s written by Pete Seeger and Joe Hickerson. ... If I Had a Hammer is a song written by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays. ... Turn! Turn! Turn!, also known by its full title Turn! Turn! Turn! (to Everything There Is A Season), is a song written by Pete Seeger, wherein Seeger set text from The Bible to music, specifically, a reading from the Book of Ecclesiastes, 3:1-8, in the Old Testament. ... The Kingston Trios original lineup: Bob Shane, Dave Guard, Nick Reynolds The Kingston Trio is an American folk group. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Johnny Rivers (born John Henry Ramistella, 7 November 1942, in New York) is an American rock and roll singer, songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. ... Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) was one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... Trini Lopez (born May 15, 1937) is a Mexican-American singer and guitarist. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... We Shall Overcome is a protest song that became a key anthem of the US civil rights movement. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... A musicologist is someone who studies musicology. ... Guy Carawan (born July 27, 1927) is a folk musician and Music Director and Song Leader for the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ...

Contents

Family and personal life

Seeger was born in New York City, USA. His father Charles Seeger was a musicologist and an early investigator of non-Western music. His stepmother, Ruth Crawford Seeger, was one of the most significant female composers of the 20th Century. His siblings Mike Seeger and Peggy Seeger also had notable musical careers. Half-brother Mike Seeger went on to form the New Lost City Ramblers, who influenced Bob Dylan. His eldest brother, Charles Seeger III, was an astronomer, and his next older brother, John Seeger, an educator. His uncle, Alan Seeger, a noted poet, was killed during the First World War. In 1936 he heard the five-string banjo for the first time at the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival in Asheville, North Carolina,[2] and his life was changed forever. Pete Seeger attended the Avon Old Farms boarding school in Connecticut, during which he was selected to attend Camp Rising Sun, the Louis August Jonas Foundation's international summer scholarship program. He then attended Harvard University until he left in 1938 during his sophomore year. In both cases, he was a scholarship student.[3] In 1943 he married Toshi-Aline Ohta, whom he credits with being the support that helped make the rest of his life possible. Pete and Toshi have three children, Daniel, Mika and Tinya, and grandchildren Tao, Cassie, Kitama, Moraya, Penny, and Isabelle. Tao is a folk musician in his own right, singing and playing guitar, banjo and harmonica with The Mammals. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Charles Seeger (Mexico City, Mexico, 1886 - 1979) was musicologist, composer, and teacher. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Ruth Crawford-Seeger (July 3, 1901 in East Liverpool, Ohio - November 18, 1953 in Chevy Chase, Maryland), born Ruth Crawford, was a modernist composer. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Mike Seeger Mike Seeger (b. ... Peggy Seeger (New York City, New York, June 17, 1935 -) is an American folk singer who also achieved renown in Britain, where she lived for more than 30 years as the wife of songwriter Ewan MacColl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mike Seeger Mike Seeger (b. ... New Lost City Ramblers The New Lost City Ramblers is a contemporary old-time string band that formed in New York City in 1958 during the Folk Revival. ... Alan Seeger in his French Foreign Legion uniform. ... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... Not to be confused with Ashville. ... Avon Old Farms is a single-sex boarding school for boys located in Avon, Connecticut. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... // Camp Rising Sun is an International, Full Scholarship, Leadership Program for Promising Youth. ... Harvard redirects here. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... Tao Rodríguez-Seeger (b. ... The Mammals are a modern folk-rock band based in Hudson Valley, NY, USA. The current band members are Michael Merenda Jr. ...


Seeger lives in the hamlet of Dutchess Junction in the Town of Fishkill, NY and remains very politically active, as well as maintaining an active lifestyle in the Hudson Valley Region of New York, especially in the nearby City of Beacon, NY. He and Toshi purchased their land in 1949, and lived there first in a trailer, then in a log cabin they built themselves, and eventually in a larger house.[4] Seeger joined the Community Church (a church practicing Unitarian Universalism)[5] and often performs at functions for the Unitarian Universalist Association.[6][7] Fishkill is a town located in Dutchess County, New York, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 20,258. ... For the magazine, see Hudson Valley (magazine). ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Country United States State New York County Dutchess Government  - Mayor Clara Lou Gould (R) Area  - City  4. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA), in full the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations in North America, is a liberal religious association of Unitarian Universalist congregations formed by the consolidation in 1961 of the American Unitarian Association and the Universalist Church of America. ...


Musical career

Early work

"Arlo, folk songs are serious."
Pete Seeger to Arlo Guthrie

Seeger dropped out of Harvard College in 1939.[8] and he took a job in Washington, D.C. at the Archive of American Folk Song in the Library of Congress. In that capacity, he met and was influenced by many other musicians such as Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly. He met Guthrie at a "Grapes of Wrath" migrant workers concert on March 3, 1940 and the two thereafter began a musical collaboration. Arlo Davy Guthrie (born July 10, 1947) is an American folk singer. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Archive of the AMVC An archive refers to a collection of historical records, and also refers to the location in which these records are kept. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Leadbelly, also known as Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 20, 1889 (although this is debatable) - December 6, 1949), was an American folk and blues musician, notable for his clear and forceful singing, his virtuosity on the twelve string guitar, and the rich songbook of folk standards he introduced. ... The Grapes of Wrath book cover The Grapes of Wrath is a work of fiction published by John Steinbeck in 1939, in which descriptive, narrative, and philosophical passages succeed one another. ... A foreign worker (cf expatriate), is a person who works in a country other than the one of which he or she is a citizen. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Pete Seeger, 1944. Eleanor Roosevelt is center.
Pete Seeger, 1944. Eleanor Roosevelt is center.

Image File history File links “Washington, D.C. Pete Seeger, noted folk singer entertaining at the opening of the Washington labor canteen, sponsored by the United Federal Labor Canteen, sponsored by the Federal Workers of American, Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). ... Image File history File links “Washington, D.C. Pete Seeger, noted folk singer entertaining at the opening of the Washington labor canteen, sponsored by the United Federal Labor Canteen, sponsored by the Federal Workers of American, Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt known as Eleanor (IPA: ; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her influence as an active First Lady from 1933 to 1945 to promote the New Deal policies of her husband, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as well as taking a prominent...

Spanish Civil War songs

Seeger has long been interested in the music that came out of the Spanish Civil War. In 1944, he was invited by Moses Asch (later of Folkways Records) to record a collection of Spanish Civil War songs. These included "Valley of Jarama" and "Peat Bog Soldiers". Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Moses (Moe) Asch was the founder of Folkways Records and a key figure in bringing folk music into the American mainstream. ... This Republican song is also known as Jarama Valley and El Valle del Jarama. ... This is one of Europes best-known protest songs. ...


In 2006, he sang eight songs for the nine-cut CD "Canciones de Las Brigadas Internacionales". These are:

  • "Valley of Jarama" (El Valle del Jarama)
  • "Cookhouse" (El Hornillo)
  • "Young Man from Alcala" (El Joven de Alcalá)
  • "Quartermaster's Song" (La Canción del Intendente)
  • "Viva la Quince Brigada"
  • "El Quinto Regimiento"
  • "Si Me Quieres Escribir" (Spanish Marching Song)
  • "Si Me Quieres Escribir"
  • "Venga Jaleo"

This Republican song is also known as Jarama Valley and El Valle del Jarama. ... The lyrics to this Republican song, which is also known as El Paso del Ebro and Viva la XV Brigada, date from the Spanish Civil War. ...

Banjo

In 1948, Seeger wrote the first version of his now-classic How to Play the Five-String Banjo, a book that many banjo players credit with starting them off on the instrument. He went on to invent the Long Neck or Seeger banjo. This instrument is three frets longer than a typical banjo, and slightly longer than a bass guitar at 25 frets, and is tuned a minor third lower than the normal 5-string banjo. For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument developed by enslaved Africans in the United States, adapted from several African instruments. ... A sunburst-colored Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ...


Group recordings

As a self-described "split tenor" (between an alto and a tenor),[9] he was a founding member of several folk groups. These included the Almanac Singers with Woody Guthrie, and the Weavers with Lee Hays, Ronnie Gilbert and Fred Hellerman. The Almanac Singers were a group of folk musicians who achieved brief popularity in the early 1940s. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... The Weavers were an immensely popular and influential folk music quartet from Greenwich Village, New York, United States. ... Lee Hays (March 14, 1914 - August 26, 1981), was an American folk-singer and songwriter, who sang bass for the Weavers. ... Ronnie Gilbert Ronnie Gilbert (born 1926) is a well-known American folk-singer, one of the members of The Weavers with Pete Seeger. ...


The Weavers had major hits in the late 1940's and early 1950s, before being blacklisted in the McCarthy Era. Their number # 1 hit of 1950 was Good Night Irene. They also performed briefly in a reunion tour in 1955, which produced the hit, 16 Tons. In The Power of Music, Seeger claims he resigned from the Weavers because the three other band members had agreed to perform a jingle for a cigarette commercial. In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... Blacklisted redirects here. ... McCarthyism, named after Joseph McCarthy, was a period of intense anticommunism, also (popularly) known as the (second) Red Scare, which occurred in the United States from 1948 to about 1956 (or later), when the government of the United States was actively engaged in suppression of the Communist Party USA, its... Reunion Tour is the tentative title of the fourth studio album by The Weakerthans, scheduled for release in the fall of 2007. ... A jingle is a memorable slogan, set to an engaging melody, mainly broadcast on radio and sometimes on television commercials. ... Unlit filtered cigarettes. ... Look up Commercial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


In 1955 he recorded an album entitled Union Songs for Folkways Records (FH 5285A). Folkways Records is a record label founded by Moses Asch. ...


Soloing

Seeger started a solo career in 1958, and is known for songs such as "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?" (co-written with Joe Hickerson), "If I Had a Hammer" (co-written with Lee Hays), "Turn, Turn, Turn," adapted from the Book of Ecclesiastes, and "We Shall Overcome" (which he and Guy Carawan based on a spiritual). Seeger became influential in the 1960s folk revival centered in Greenwich Village. He helped found Broadside Magazine and Sing Out!. He was strongly associated with Moses Asch and Folkways Records. To describe the new crop of folk singers, many of whom were politically minded in their songs, he coined the phrase "Woody's children", alluding to his former bandmate Woody Guthrie, who by this time had become a legendary figure. He has often sung and is associated with the song "Joe Hill". He also performed and recorded covers of Woody Guthrie's "This Land is Your Land" and the folk classics "Michael Row Your Boat Ashore" and "This Little Light of Mine." See also: 1957 in music, other events of 1958, 1959 in music, 1950s in music and the list of years in music // Events January 28 - Little Richard begins attending classes at Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama February 14 - The Iranian government bans rock & roll because they claim that the form... Where Have All the Flowers Gone? is a folk song of the 1960s written by Pete Seeger and Joe Hickerson. ... Joe Hickerson (born 1935) is a noted folk singer and songleader. ... If I Had a Hammer is a song written by Pete Seeger and Lee Hays. ... Turn! Turn! Turn!, also known by its full title Turn! Turn! Turn! (to Everything There Is A Season), is a song written by Pete Seeger, wherein Seeger set text from The Bible to music, specifically, a reading from the Book of Ecclesiastes, 3:1-8, in the Old Testament. ... Ecclesiastes, Kohelet in Hebrew, is a book of the Hebrew Bible. ... We Shall Overcome is a protest song that became a key anthem of the US civil rights movement. ... Guy Carawan (born July 27, 1927) is a folk musician and Music Director and Song Leader for the Highlander Research and Education Center in New Market, Tennessee. ... == Historical background on spiritual music Spirituals were often expressions of religious faith, although they may also have served as socio-political protests veiled as assimilation to white, American culture. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969. ... The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Broadside Magazine Hugely influential in the folk-revival, Broadside Magazine was a small mimeographed publication founded in 1962 by Agnes Sis Cunningham and husband Gordon Friesen. ... Sing Out! is a quarterly journal of folk music and folk songs that has been published since May 1950. ... Moses (Moe) Asch was the founder of Folkways Records and a key figure in bringing folk music into the American mainstream. ... Folkways Records is a record label founded by Moses Asch. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... For other persons named Joe Hill, see Joe Hill (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: This Land Is Your Land This Land Is Your Land is one of the United States most famous folk songs. ... Michael, Row the Boat Ashore (or Michael, Row Your Boat Ashore) is an African-American spiritual from the Sea Islands of Georgia. ... This Little Light of Mine is a Negro spiritual, themed on the importance of unity in the face of struggle. ...


In the late 1950's and early 1960's Seeger toured college campuses extensively. He made a world tour starting in 1962.


Pete Seeger made his only tour of Australia in 1963. At the time of this tour, his single Little Boxes was number one in the nation's Top 40's. In 1993, the Australian singer/plawright Maurie Mulherin, assembled an anthology of Seeger's work in a stage production Wasn't That a Time?. It enjoyed a long and sold-out season at the New Theatre in the inner Sydney suburb of Newtown. Little Boxes, a song written by Malvina Reynolds in 1962, lampoons the development of suburbia and what many consider its bourgeois values. ...


In the mid-60s he hosted a regional folk music television show called Rainbow Quest, which featured folk musicians playing traditional folk music. Among his guests were Johnny Cash, June Carter, Mississippi John Hurt, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Roscoe Holcomb, The Stanley Brothers, Doc Watson, Tom Paxton, Judy Collins, Richard Fariña, The Beers Family, and Mimi Fariña, and many others. Thirty-eight hourlong programs were recorded at new UHF station WNJU's Newark studios in 1965 and 1966, produced by Seeger and his wife Toshi with Sholom Rubinstein. For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Valerie June Carter Cash (June 23, 1929 – May 15, 2003) was a singer, songwriter, actress and comedian and was a member of the Carter Family, and the second wife of singer Johnny Cash. ... Mississippi John Smith Hurt (March 8, 1892 , Teoc, Carroll County, Mississippi - November 2, 1966, Grenada, Mississippi) was an influential blues singer and guitarist. ... 7 Buffy Sainte-Marie Buffy Sainte-Marie (born February 20, 1941) is a Canadian First Nations musician, composer, visual artist, educator and social activist. ... Roscoe Holcomb (1911-1981) was an American singer, banjo player, and guitarist from Daisy, Kentucky. ... Carter and Ralph Stanley The Stanley Brothers (Carter Stanley, 1925-1966, and Ralph Stanley, born 1927) - American bluegrass musicians. ... Doc Watson Merle Watson, c. ... Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer and songwriter, known for the stunning purity of her soprano; for her eclectic tastes in the material she records (which has included folk, showtunes, pop, and rock and roll); and for her social... Richard George Fariña ( March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966 ) was an American writer and folksinger. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Ultra high frequency (UHF) designates a range (band) of electromagnetic waves whose frequency is between 300 MHz and 3. ... WNJU is the Telemundo flagship station for the New York City area. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ...

Seeger at 86 on the cover of Sing Out! (Summer 2005), a magazine that he helped found in 1950 and to which he still occasionally contributes.
Seeger at 86 on the cover of Sing Out! (Summer 2005), a magazine that he helped found in 1950 and to which he still occasionally contributes.

An early advocate of Bob Dylan, Seeger was supposedly incensed over the distorted electric sound Dylan brought into the 1965 Newport Folk Festival, especially with the inability to clearly hear the lyrics. There are many conflicting versions of exactly what ensued,[10] some claiming that he actually tried to disconnect the equipment. He is often cited as one of the main opponents to Dylan at Newport 1965, but asked in 2001 about how he recalled his "objections" to the "electric" style, he said: Image File history File links SO!vol49_2_Pete_Seeger. ... Image File history File links SO!vol49_2_Pete_Seeger. ... Sing Out! is a quarterly journal of folk music and folk songs that has been published since May 1950. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ...

I couldn't understand the words. I wanted to hear the words. It was a great song, "Maggie's Farm," and the sound was distorted. I ran over to the guy at the controls and shouted, "Fix the sound so you can hear the words." He hollered back, "This is the way they want it." I said "Damn it, if I had an axe, I'd cut the cable right now." But I was at fault. I was the MC, and I could have said to the part of the crowd that booed Bob, "you didn't boo Howlin' Wolf yesterday. He was electric!" Though I still prefer to hear Dylan acoustic, some of his electric songs are absolutely great. Electric music is the vernacular of the second half of the twentieth century, to use my father's old term.[11]

Later work

In 1998 a double-CD tribute album was released - "Where Have All the Flowers Gone: the Songs of Pete Seeger". It contained contributions from Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne, Tom Paxton, Ani DiFranco, Billy Bragg, Eliza Carthy, Bruce Springsteen, Roger McGuinn, Judy Collins, Indigo Girls, Dick Gaughan, Martin Simpson, Odetta and others. Bonnie Raitt, (born November 8, 1949) is an American Blues-R&B singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was born in Burbank, California, the daughter of Broadway musical star John Raitt. ... Clyde Jackson Browne (born October 9, 1948) is an American rock music singer, songwriter, guitarist, and pianist, whose introspective lyrics made him the poster boy of the Southern California confessional singer-songwriter movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Thomas R. Paxton was born October 31, 1937 in Chicago, Illinois, the youngest child of Burton and Esther Paxton. ... Ani DiFranco (IPA: ) (born Angela Maria Difranco on September 23, 1970) is a singer, guitarist, and songwriter. ... Stephen William Bragg (born December 20, 1957 in Essex, England), better known as Billy Bragg, is an English musician who blends elements of folk music, punk rock and protest songs. ... March 2005, at the Junction, Cambridge Eliza Carthy (born August 23, 1975) is an English folk musician known for both singing and playing fiddle. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Judith Marjorie Collins (born May 1, 1939 in Seattle, Washington) is an American folk and standards singer and songwriter, known for the stunning purity of her soprano; for her eclectic tastes in the material she records (which has included folk, showtunes, pop, and rock and roll); and for her social... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Dick Gaughan is a Scottish singer-songwriter. ... Martin Simpson (b 1953) is an English guitarist. ... Odetta (b. ...


Pete Seeger still performs occasionally in public, and for a number of years has appeared at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough Tennessee to tell stories, these days mostly children's stories such as Abiyoyo. He performed at MerleFest April 27April 30, 2006 in Wilkesboro, NC. Jonesboro or Jonesborough is the name of a number of cities in the United States of America and the United Kingdom: [Jonesborough, County Armagh Northern Ireland http://jonesborough. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... MerleFest is an annual Americana music festival held in Wilkesboro, North Carolina by Wilkes Community College at the end of April. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wilkesboro is a town in Wilkes County, North Carolina, United States. ...


On March 16, 2007, the 88-year old Pete Seeger performed with his siblings Mike and Peggy and other Seeger family members at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., where he had been employed as a folk song archivist 67 years earlier. is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


In April 2006, Bruce Springsteen released a collection of songs associated with Seeger or in Seeger's folk tradition, We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions. Springsteen performed a series of concerts based on those sessions, to sellout crowds. Springsteen had previously recorded one Seeger favorite, "We Shall Overcome," on the 1998 "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" tribute album. Springsteen redirects here. ...


Activism

Pre-1950

As a young man Seeger was a Communist Party member and activist. His anti-war record Songs for John Doe was released in 1941. After Germany’s breaking of the pact and its attack on the Soviet Union, copies were removed from sale and the remaining inventory was reportedly destroyed. Only a few copies exist to this day.[citation needed] The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... Songs For John Doe is the 1941 debut album and first released product of influential folk musicians, The Almanac Singers. ...


After Germany invaded the Soviet Union, Seeger became a strong proponent of military action against Germany. He served in the US Army in the Pacific. He was trained as an airplane mechanic, but reassigned to entertain the American troops with music. Later, when people asked him what he did in the war, he always answered "I strummed my banjo". After returning from service, Seeger established People's Songs, an organization designed to 'Create, promote and distribute songs of labor and the American People"[12] Seeger tried to get Henry A. Wallace elected President in 1948. [13] The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The Pacific Ocean theater was one of four major theaters of the Pacific War, between 1941 and 1945. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ...


1950s

Seeger left the communist party in 1950 and openly rejected the policies of Stalin and the Stalinist form of Communism practiced in the Soviet Union. After 1950, Seeger became an anti-Stalinist socialist and continued strong support of the labor movement in the U.S. Seeger said of his renouncement of communism: "I realized I could sing the same songs I sang whether I belonged to the Communist Party or not, and I never liked the idea anyway of belonging to a secret organization."[14] Socialism is a broad array of ideologies and political movements with the goal of a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to control by the community for the purposes of increasing social and economic equality and cooperation. ...


Seeger has made his rejection of Stalin publicly explicit several times. Among these are his 1993 book Where Have All the Flowers Gone?, and a 1995 interview with The New York Times Magazine. In 2007, he wrote a song condemning Stalin, "Big Joe Blues", and also a letter to historian Ron Radosh, an anticommunist critic of Seeger, apologizing for being blind to Stalin's failings. "I think you’re right," wrote Seeger, "I should have asked to see the gulags when I was in U.S.S.R." [15] Ronald Radosh is an American historian specializing in the espionage case of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. ...


Early 1960s

Pete Seeger was convicted for contempt of congress in 1961. He was sentenced to a year's imprisonment. However the conviction was eventually overturned and he did not go to jail, other than for a few hours. The charge stemmed from an incident that occurred six years earlier in 1955 when Seeger refused to divluge personal information to the since-disbanded House committee on un-American activities.[16].


On August 18, 1955, Seeger was subpoenaed to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) where he refused to name personal and political associations stating it would violate his First Amendment rights... "I am not going to answer any questions as to my association, my philosophical or religious beliefs or my political beliefs, or how I voted in any election, or any of these private affairs. I think these are very improper questions for any American to be asked, especially under such compulsion as this."[17] Seeger's refusal to testify led to a March 26, 1957 indictment for contempt of Congress; for some years, he had to keep the federal government apprised of where he was going any time he left the Southern District of New York. He was convicted in a jury trial in March 1961, and sentenced to a year in jail, but in May 1962 an appeals court ruled the indictment to be flawed and overturned his conviction.[18] is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... “First Amendment” redirects here. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Contempt of Congress is the act of obstructing the work of the United States Congress or one of its committees. ...


Vietnam War era

Seeger satirically attacked then-President Lyndon Johnson with his 1966 recording, on the album Dangerous Songs!?, of Len Chandler's children's song, "Beans in My Ears". Beyond Chandler's lyrics, Seeger said that "Mrs. Jay's little son Alby" had "beans in his ears", which, as the lyrics imply[19], ensures that a person does not hear what is said to them. To those opposed to continuing the Vietnam War the phrase implied that "Alby Jay" was a loose pronunciation of Johnson's nickname "LBJ", and sarcastically suggested "that must explain why he doesn't respond to the protests against his war policies". 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Len Chandler (b. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Seeger attracted wider attention starting in 1967 with his song "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy", about a captain — referred to in the lyrics as "the big fool" — who drowned while leading a platoon on maneuvers in Louisiana during World War II. In the face of arguments with the management of CBS about whether the song's political weight was in keeping with the usually light-hearted entertainment of the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, the final lines were "Every time I read the paper/those old feelings come on/We are waist deep in the Big Muddy and the big fool says to push on." And it was not seriously contested[citation needed] that much of the audience would grasp Seeger's allegorical casting of Johnson as the "big fool" and the Vietnam War the foreseeable danger. Although the performance was cut from the September 1967 show,[20] after wide publicity[21], it was broadcast when Seeger appeared again on the Smothers' Brothers show in the following January.[22] Deep in the Big Muddy. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the broadcast network. ... The Smothers Brothers are an American musical-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom and Dick Smothers. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Inspired by Woody Guthrie, whose guitar was labeled "This machine kills fascists," photo Seeger's banjo was emblazoned with the motto "This Machine Surrounds Hate and Forces It to Surrender."photo Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Download high resolution version (733x930, 53 KB)Woody Guthrie This work is copyrighted. ...


Environment

Seeger is involved in the environmental organization Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, which he co-founded in 1966. This organization has worked since then to highlight pollution in the Hudson River and worked to clean it. As part of that effort, the sloop Clearwater was launched in 1969 with its inaugural sail down from Maine to South Street Seaport Museum in New York City, and thence to the Hudson River.[23] The sloop regularly sails the river with volunteer and professional crew members, primarily conducting environmental education programs for school groups. The Great Hudson River Revival (aka Clearwater Festival) is an annual two-day music festival held on the banks of the Hudson at Croton Point Park. This festival grew out of early fundraising concerts arranged by Seeger and friends to raise money to pay for Clearwater's construction. It has been suggested that Sloop Clearwater, Clearwater Festival be merged into this article or section. ... Air pollution Pollution is the introduction of pollutants (whether chemical substances, or energy such as noise, heat, or light) into the environment to such a point that its effects become harmful to human health, other living organisms, or the environment. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat A sloop (From Dutch sloep) in sailing, is a vessel with a fore-and-aft rig. ... the Clearwater Launched in 1969, the sloop Clearwater is an environmental classroom sailing on the Hudson River, New York. ... Inauguration Day is the day on which the President of the United States is sworn in and takes office. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The South Street Seaport is a historic area in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located where Fulton Street meets the East River, and adjacent to the Financial District. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and... The Clearwater Festival, (officially The Great Hudson River Revival), music and environmental summer festival is America’s oldest and largest annual festival of its kind. ...

Seeger's album Clearwater Classics. The title alludes to his work with the Clearwater group, working to clean the Hudson River.
Seeger's album Clearwater Classics. The title alludes to his work with the Clearwater group, working to clean the Hudson River.

Seeger wrote and performed "That Lonesome Valley" about the then-polluted Hudson River in 1969, and his band members also wrote and performed songs commemorating the Clearwater. Image File history File links Pete_Seeger_Clearwater. ... Image File history File links Pete_Seeger_Clearwater. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... The Hudson River, called Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk in Mahican or as the Lenape Native Americans called it in Unami, Muhheakantuck, is a river that runs through the eastern portion of New York State and, along its southern terminus, demarcates the border between the states of New York and...


Awards

Seeger has been the recipient of many awards and recognitions throughout his career, including :

There is also currently a petition being circulated to persuade the Norwegian Nobel Committee to nominate Seeger for a Nobel Peace Prize. The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... The National Endowment for the Arts is a United States federally funded program that offers support and funding for projects that exhibit artistic excellence. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Norwegian Nobel Committee (Den norske Nobelkomité) awards the Nobel Peace Prize each year. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ...


Quotes

From Seeger

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Pete Seeger
  • "I like to say I'm more conservative than Goldwater. He just wanted to turn the clock back to when there was no income tax. I want to turn the clock back to when people lived in small villages and took care of each other."
  • "My father, Charles Seeger, got me into the Communist movement. He backed out around '38. I drifted out in the '50s. I apologize [in his recent book] for following the party line so slavishly, for not seeing that Stalin was a supremely cruel misleader."
  • "I still call myself a communist, because communism is no more what Russia made of it than Christianity is what the churches make of it. But if by some freak of history communism had caught up with this country, I would have been one of the first people thrown in jail."
  • "Plagiarism is the basis of all culture." Seeger quoting his father.
  • "Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple."
  • "Some may find them [songs] merely diverting melodies. Others may find them incitements to Red revolution. And who will say if either or both is wrong? Not I."
  • "Technology will save us if it doesn't wipe us out first."
  • "There is hope for the world." - in Pete Seeger: The Power of Song.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Conservatism is a term used to describe political philosophies that favor tradition and gradual change, where tradition refers to religious, cultural, or nationally defined beliefs and customs. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is...

From others

Jim Musselman (founder of Appleseed Recordings), longtime friend and record producer for Pete Seeger:

"He was one of the few people who invoked the First Amendment in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Everyone else had said the Fifth Amendment, the right against self-incrimination, and then they were dismissed. What Pete did, and what some other very powerful people who had the guts and the intestinal fortitude to stand up to the committee and say, "I'm gonna invoke the First Amendment, the right of freedom of association...." "
"...I was actually in law school when I read the case of Seeger v. United States, and it really changed my life, because I saw the courage of what he had done and what some other people had done by invoking the First Amendment, saying, "We're all Americans. We can associate with whoever we want to, and it doesn't matter who we associate with." That's what the founding fathers set up democracy to be. So I just really feel it's an important part of history that people need to remember."[24]

“First Amendment” redirects here. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... Amendment V (the Fifth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, is related to legal procedure. ... A legal motion is a procedural device in law to bring a limited, contested matter before a court for decision. ... Protestors opposing the jailing of the Hollywood Ten in 1950 (from the 1987 documentary Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist). ...

See also

  • Tao Rodríguez-Seeger - grandson
  • Tom Winslow - former band member

Tao Rodríguez-Seeger (b. ... Tom Winslow is a prominent American folk singer and writer, who is best known as a disciple of Reverend Gary Davis and a former member of Pete Seegers band. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p.44
  2. ^ Dunaway 1990, p. 48-49.
  3. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 50.
  4. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 47–48.
  5. ^ Wendy Schuman, Pete Seeger's session, Beliefnet. The interview is undated, but he remarks on being married 63 years, so it is in 2006–2007. Accessed online 16 October 2007.
  6. ^ Opening Celebration and Plenary I of the Unitarian Universalist Association, 2005. Accessed online 16 October 2007.
  7. ^ There is a mention in of him (along with several other famous Unitarian Universalists) in the lead paragraph of the article Unitarian Universalism on the official site of the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregation. Accessed online 16 October 2007.
  8. ^ According to [Wilkinson 2006], p. 51, he failed one of his winter exams and lost his scholarship.
  9. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 47.
  10. ^ In the Dylan documentary No Direction Home, John Cohen, Maria Muldaur and Seeger himself recount conflicting memories and impressions of the incident.
  11. ^ David Kupfer, Longtime Passing: An interview with Pete Seeger, Whole Earth magazine, Spring 2001. Accessed online 16 October 2007.
  12. ^ People's Songs Inc. People's Songs Newsletter No 1. Feb 1946. Old Town School of Folk Music Resource center collection.
  13. ^ American Masters: "Pete Seeger: The Power of Song - KQED Broadcast 2-27-08
  14. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 52.
  15. ^ Daniel J. Wakin, This Just In: Pete Seeger Denounced Stalin Over a Decade Ago, New York Times, September 1, 2007. Accessed 16 October 2007.
  16. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 53.
  17. ^ Pete Seeger to the House Unamerican Activities Committee, August 18, 1955. Quoted, along with some other exchanges from that hearing, in [Wilkinson 2006], p.53
  18. ^ [Wilkinson 2006], p. 53.
  19. ^ Beans in My Ears
  20. ^ Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, CBS, Season 2, Episode 1, 10 September 1967.
  21. ^ How "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy" Finally Got on Network Television in 1968
  22. ^ Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, CBS, Season 2, Episode 24, 25 February 1968.
  23. ^ Featured in the PBS documentary, a more specific cite is needed.
  24. ^ We Shall Overcome: An Hour With Legendary Folk Singer & Activist Pete Seeger, Democracy Now!, September 4, 2006. Accessed 16 October 2007.

Dr. David King Dunaway is Professor of English and Communications (adjunct) at the University of New Mexico, Department of English. ... Marriage is a relationship that plays a key role in the definition of many families. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... Johen Cohen, manchester Uk REUINION FINANCE, SPEEDY FINANCE 31 REEDHAM HOUSE KING STREET WEST MANCHESTER LANCASHIRE M3 2PJ business -BANKRUPT -ALL LOANS ARE UNENFORCABLE allegations of 250,000 in stolen funds wife - ran off with mp KHALID MAHMOOD, had affair stole 250,000 pounds from REUnion finance police investigation check... Maria Muldaur (Born Maria DAmato on September 12, 1943 in New York) is a roots-folk singer best known for her song Midnight at the Oasis. ... The Old Town School of Folk Music is a Chicago teaching and performing institution that launched the careers of many notable folk music artists. ... KQED is a public broadcasting company based in San Francisco, California. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

References

  • Forbes, Linda C. "Pete Seeger on Environmental Advocacy, Organizing, and Education in the Hudson River Valley: An Interview with the Folk Music Legend, Author and Storyteller, Political and Environmental Activist, and Grassroots Organizer." Organization & Environment, 17, No. 4, 2004: 513-522.
  • Seeger, Pete. How to Play the Five-String Banjo, 3rd edition. New York: Music Sales Corporation, 1969. ISBN 0-8256-0024-3.
  • Dunaway, David K., How Can I Keep from Singing: Pete Seeger, McGraw Hill (1981), DaCapo (1990), Villard (2008) ISBN 0-07-018150-0, ISBN 0-07-018151-9, ISBN 0-306-80399-2, ISBN 0-345-50608-1.
  • Wilkinson, Alec, "The Protest Singer: Pete Seeger and American folk music", The New Yorker, April 17, 2006, p. 44–53.
  • Zollo, Paul. "Pete Seeger Reflects On His Legendary Songs", GRAMMY Magazine, 7 January 2005. 
  • Gardner, Elysa. "Seeger: A 'Power' in music, politics." USA Today, February 27, 2008. p. 8D.

For other uses, see New Yorker. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...

External links

  • PBS's American Masters site for "Pete Seeger: The Power of Song"
  • Pete Seeger Appreciation Page, a site originally created by Jim Capaldi
  • "Pete Seeger: The Power of Song" documentary filmmaker Jim Brown interview on The Alcove with Mark Molaro, 2007
  • "To Hear Your Banjo Play" a movie at archive.org narrated by Pete Seeger
  • "We Shall Overcome: An Hour With Legendary Folk Singer & Activist Pete Seeger" (Democracy Now!)
  • Folk Banjo inspired by Pete Seeger
  • On Point Radio : "The World According to Pete Seeger"
  • "Pete Seeger Is 86", Studs Terkel, The Nation, May 16, 2005
  • Folk Legend Pete Seeger Looks Back - National Public Radio interview
  • Peter Seeger interviewed by Australian composer Andrew Ford (MP3 of interview first broadcast in 1999)
  • Essay on Seeger's Americanism by Seeger's friend, the author Edward J. Renehan Jr.
  • Pete Seeger, Folk Singer and Song Writer by Thomas Blair. Part of a series of Notable Americans
  • 1 Hour Internet Radio Interview with Pete Seeger August, 2007. Pete talks about his experiences dealing with the music industry over his long career, trying to get by as a young artist, music in the public domain and the world in general.
  • "Pete Seeger, una leyenda" by Gani Jakupi (comic book in Spanish)
Jim Capaldi (2 August 1944 – 28 January 2005) was an English musician and songwriter and a founding member of Traffic. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NPR redirects here. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pete Seeger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1544 words)
Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919 in New York City), almost universally known as "Pete Seeger", is a folk singer and political activist.
Seeger is involved in the environmental organization the Clearwater group, which he founded in 1966.
Seeger is known for his ardent political beliefs and his involvement with leftist political organizations, including the Communist Party.
Pete Seeger - definition of Pete Seeger in Encyclopedia (656 words)
Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), almost always known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist and major contributor to folk and protest music in 1950s and 1960s.
Seeger is also well known for his communist political beliefs, leading political opponents to call him by pejorative names such as "Stalin's Songbird".
Like most members of the CPUSA, Seeger was virulently opposed to any action against Hitler from the time of the signing of the non-aggression pact between Germany and the USSR until it was broken by Operation Barbarossa on June 22, 1941.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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