FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Persian people
Persians
Total population

Approximately 50-70 million Persians (including related/subgroups)
150 million to 250 million total Iranian population
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Language(s) Persian (varieties of Dari and Tajiki) Religion(s) Islam (predominantly Sunni, with sizable Ithna Ashari and Ismaili minorities) Tājīk (Persian: ; UniPers: Tâjik; Tajik: ) is a term generally applied to Persian-speaking peoples of Iranian origin living east of Iran. ... Persia redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 262 pixelsFull resolution (827 × 271 pixel, file size: 91 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From left to right: Cyrus the Great, Darius the Great, Saadi Shirazi, Anousheh Ansari Images: Image:Cyrus portrait. ... “Cyrus” redirects here. ... Darius the Great (c. ... Sheikh Sa‘di (in Persian: , full name in English: Muslih-ud-Din Mushrif-ibn-Abdullah) (1184 - 1283/1291?) is one of the major Persian poets of the medieval period. ... Anousheh Ansari (Persian: , born 12 September 1966) is the Iranian-American co-founder and chairman of Prodea Systems, Inc and a spaceflight participant with the Russian space program. ...

Regions with significant populations
Flag of Iran Iran 40 - 50 million [1][2] [3]
Flag of the United States United States 1,186,140 [4]
Flag of Turkey Turkey 800,000 [5]
Flag of the United Arab Emirates UAE 400,000 [6]
Flag of Iraq Iraq 227,000 [7]
Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom 130,000
Flag of Pakistan Pakistan 110,000
Flag of Germany Germany 110,000 [8]
Flag of Canada Canada 88,200 [5]
Flag of Israel Israel 40,000 [5]
Flag of Qatar Qatar 73,000 [9]
Flag of France France 62,000 [5]
Flag of India India 60,000 (Parsi and Irani people) [5]
Flag of Kuwait Kuwait 60,000
Flag of Sweden Sweden 60,000
Flag of Russia Russia 50,000
Flag of Syria Syria 50,000 [5]
Flag of Bahrain Bahrain 48,000 [10]
Flag of Azerbaijan Azerbaijan 22,000 (Speak a Medieval Iranian Dialect called Tat-Iranian )[11] [1]
Flag of Greece Greece 20,000 [5]
Flag of Denmark Denmark 10,000 [5]
Flag of Belgium Belgium 6,000 [5]
Flag of Norway Norway 6,000 [5]
Flag of Finland Finland 2,000 [5]
Language(s)
Persian (Western dialect, in addition to regional varieties)
Religion(s)
Predominately Shi'a Muslim,[12][13] and small minorities of Sunni Muslims, Bahá'ís, Christians, Jews, and Zoroastrians. Unknown number of Atheists and Agnostics

The Persians are Iranian people who live primarily in Iran with expatriate communities in many bordering countries as well as the Persian Gulf states. Significant colonies of Persians reside overseas in North America and Europe. Persians are typically characterized by their usuage of the Persian language and a common culture and history. Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates. ... UAE redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iraq. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Qatar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Kuwait. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Russia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Syria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bahrain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Azerbaijan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Finland. ... Farsi redirects here. ... Shia Islam, also Shi`ite Islam or Shi`ism (Arabic: ‎ transliterated: Persian: ‎ ) is the second largest denomination of the religion of Islam. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Agnosticism is the philosophical and theological view that the existence of God, gods or deities is either unknown or inherently unknowable. ... Iranian peoples are peoples who speak an Iranian language and/or belong to the Iranian stock. ... For the band, see Expatriate (band). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf. ... North American redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Farsi redirects here. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... edit Geographical extent of Iranian influence in the 1st century BCE. The Parthian Empire (mostly Western Iranian) is shown in red, other areas, dominated by Scythia (mostly Eastern Iranian), in orange. ...


Persian identity, at least in terms of language, is traced to the ancient Indo-European Aryans who arrived circa 2000-1500 BCE. Starting around 550 BCE, from the province of Fars, the ancient Persians spread their language and culture to other parts of the Iranian plateau through conquest and assimilated local Aryan and non-Aryan groups over time. This process of assimilating other Iranian peoples continued in the face of Greek, Arab and Turkic invasions and would take centuries and continued right up to Islamic times.[14] Numerous dialects and regional identities emerged over time, while a Persian national orientation fully manifested itself by the 20th century, mirroring developments in post-Ottoman Turkey, the Arab world and Europe. With the losses of Afghanistan and territories in the Caucasus [15], Persian identity became focused upon the current borders of Iran. Looking to link the modern state with the imperialist past, the Reza Shah government switched the country name from Persia to Iran in 1935, signaling the emergence of Iranian nationalism and later, following the Iranian Revolution, emphasis shifted to Shia Islamic values. The synonymous usage of Iranian and Persian has persisted over the centuries despite the varied meanings of Iranian, which includes different but related languages and ethnic groups. Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Indo-European is originally a linguistic term, referring to the Indo-European language family. ... Map of the Sintashta-Petrovka culture (red), its expansion into the Andronovo culture during the 2nd millennium BC, showing the overlap with the BMAC in the south. ... // Introduction Fars is one of the 30 provinces of Iran. ... Topographic map of the Iranian plateau connecting to Anatolia in the west and Hindu Kush and Himalaya in the east Iranian plateau is both a geographical area of South or West Asia, home of ancient civilizations[1], and a geological area of Eurasia north of the great folded mountain belts... Elam (Persian: تمدن ایلام) is one of the oldest recorded civilizations. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Islamic conquest of Afghanistan. ... The Ghaznavid Empire (سلسله غزنویان in Persian) was a state in the region of todays Afghanistan that existed from 962 to 1187. ... Public demonstration in the Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, 1908 The Young Turk Revolution of 1908 reversed the suspension of the Ottoman parliament by Sultan Abdul Hamid II, marking the onset of the Second Constitutional Era. ... Arab nationalism refers to a common nationalist ideology in wider Arab world. ... This article is about the country in Eurasia. ... Reza Shah, also Reza Shah the Great, Reza Shah Pahlavi and Reza Pahlavi (Persian: , Rez̤ā Pahlavī), (March 16, 1878 – July 26, 1944), was Shah of Iran[1] from December 15, 1925 until he was forced to abdicate after the Anglo-Soviet invasion of Iran in September 16, 1941 by British... Derafsh Kaviani, one of the nationalist symbols introduced by Ferdowsi. ... This article is about the 1979 revolution in Iran. ... Ł Islam is the religion of 5000% of Iranians of which approximately 500% are Shia and 93% are Sunni, mostly Turkomen, a minority of Arabs, Pashtuns, Baluchs, and Kurds living in the southwest, southeast, northeast and northwest. ...


Persians, even under theocratic governments, have shown a strong predilection towards urbanization and modernity. Exiled communities in the United States and Europe have continued to maintain close ties with their families in Iran and are a source of Western influence. In addition, with the break-up of the former Soviet Union, Persians have also begun to foster closer cultural ties with closely related groups in the Caucasus including the Tats and Talysh as well as Central Asian Persians in Tajikistan and Afghanistan. The politics and government of Iran takes place in the framework of a republic with Islamist ideology. ... Modernity is a term used to describe the condition of being related to modernism. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Tat are an Iranian-speaking ethnic group in the Caucasus. ... Talysh (also Talishi, Taleshi or Talyshi) are an Iranian people who speak one of the Northwestern Iranian languages. ... Language(s) Persian (varieties of Dari and Tajiki) Religion(s) Islam (predominantly Sunni, with sizable Ithna Ashari and Ismaili minorities) Tājīk (Persian: ; UniPers: Tâjik; Tajik: ) is a term generally applied to Persian-speaking peoples of Iranian origin living east of Iran. ...

Contents

Terminology

The term Persia was adopted by all western languages through the Greeks and was used as an official name for Iran by the West until 1935. Due to that label, all Iranians were considered Persian. Therefore, many Western sources, when regarding Iran's history, will label many non-Persian Iranians as Persians, which distinguishes ethnicity. Also, many others who embraced the Persian language and culture are also often referred to as Persian as a part of Persian civilization (culturally and linguistically).


The first known written record about them is from an Assyrian inscription of the 834 BC, which mentions both Parsua (Persians) and Muddai (Medes).[16][17] The term used by Assyrians, Parsua, was a general designation to refer to southwestern Iranian tribes (who referred to themselves as Aryans). Greeks rendered this word as Persis, which is where the word Persian in English comes from. In Arabic as there is no letter P, they referred to Persia and vs as Fars (Faras) and Farsis. For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ...


In its modern definition, the term Persians refers to the people speaking the Western dialect of Persian language and living in the modern country of Iran, as well as the descendants of the people who emigrated from the territory of modern-day Iran to neighboring countries, such as Turkey, the UAE, Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, and more recently, to the West (notably USA, United Kingdom, Germany, Canada…).


Related groups and sub-groups

Main articles: Tajiks, Farsiwan, Kizilbash, and Hazara people

Ethnic Persians can also be found outside Iran and include the Tajiks and Farsiwan of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Xinjiang province of China. Like the Persians of Iran, the Tajiks are descendents of various Iranian peoples, including Persians from Iran, as well as numerous invaders. Tajiks and their cousins the Farsiwan have a particular affinity with Persians in neighboring Khorasan due to historical interaction some stemming from the Islamic period. Language(s) Persian (varieties of Dari and Tajiki) Religion(s) Islam (predominantly Sunni, with sizable Ithna Ashari and Ismaili minorities) Tājīk (Persian: ; UniPers: Tâjik; Tajik: ) is a term generally applied to Persian-speaking peoples of Iranian origin living east of Iran. ... Fārsīwān or Pārsīwān (Persian-speakers), or simply Pārsī (Persians), is another term often used for urbanized Tajiks of Afghanistan and Pakistan. ... Kizilbash (Turkish: Kızılbaş, Azerbaijani: Qızılbaş, Persian: قزلباش Qezelbāsh) - Red Heads - name given to a wide variety of extremist Shiite militant groups (ghulāt) who helped found the Safavid Dynasty of Iran. ... Language(s) Hazaragi/Dari (Hazaragi and Dari dialects) Religion(s) Shia, some Sunni Related ethnic groups Mongol, Turkic, Iranian The Hazara are an ethnic group who reside mainly in the central region of Afghanistan, called Hazarajat or Hazaristan. ... Language(s) Persian (varieties of Dari and Tajiki) Religion(s) Islam (predominantly Sunni, with sizable Ithna Ashari and Ismaili minorities) Tājīk (Persian: ; UniPers: Tâjik; Tajik: ) is a term generally applied to Persian-speaking peoples of Iranian origin living east of Iran. ... Fārsīwān or Pārsīwān (Persian-speakers), or simply Pārsī (Persians), is another term often used for urbanized Tajiks of Afghanistan and Pakistan. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... Map showing the pre-2004 Khorasan Province in Iran Khorasan (Persian: خراسان) (also transcribed as Khurasan and Khorassan, anciently called Traxiane during Hellenistic and Parthian times is currently a region located in north eastern Iran, but historically referred to a much larger area east and north-east of the Persian Empire...


Other smaller groups include the Qizilbash of Afghanistan and Pakistan who are related to the Farsiwan and Azerbaijanis. In the Caucasus, the Tats are concentrated in Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Russian Dagestan and their origins are traced to Sassanid merchants who settled in the region. Parsis, a Zoroastrian sect of western India and Pakistan, centred around Gujarat and Mumbai, are also largely descended from Persian Zoroastrians. The Iranis, another small community in western India, are descended from more recent Persian Zoroastrian immigrants. The small number of Nakhuda's of the western Indian coastal towns of Tadkeshwar and Surat also appear to be descendents of Persian ship owning merchants/Immigrants. In addition, the Hazara and Aimaq are ethnic groups of partial Persianized Mongol and Turkic origin. Qizilbash or Kizilbash (Ottoman Turkish/Persian: Qezelbāš, Turkish: Kızılbaş, Azerbaijani: Qızılbaş) - Turkish for Red Heads - name given to a wide variety of extremist Shiite militant groups (ghulāt) who helped found the Safavid Dynasty of Iran. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... The Tat are an Iranian-speaking ethnic group in the Caucasus. ... The Republic of Dagestan IPA: (Russian: ; Avar: , ), older spelling Daghestan, is a federal subject of the Russian Federation (a republic). ... Head of king Shapur II (Sasanian dynasty A.D. 4th century). ... a person from Pars (the middle-Persian word for Fars), a region now within the geographical boundaries of Iran, and is roughly the original homeland of the Persian people. ... Zoroastrianism was adapted from an earlier, polytheistic faith by Zarathushtra (Zoroaster) in Persia very roughly around 1000 BC (although, in the absence of written records, some scholars estimates are as late as 600 BC). ... This article is for the Indian state. ... , Bombay redirects here. ... Irani is a term used to denote Indian Zoroastrians whose ancestors emigrated from Iran within the last two centuries, as opposed to the longer residing Parsis. ... Nākhudā (when Anglicised, also written Naghdeh, Nakhooda, Nakhoda, Nakoda and Nacoda) is a term originating from the Persian language which literally means Captain. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Language(s) Hazaragi/Dari (Hazaragi and Dari dialects) Religion(s) Shia, some Sunni Related ethnic groups Mongol, Turkic, Iranian The Hazara are an ethnic group who reside mainly in the central region of Afghanistan, called Hazarajat or Hazaristan. ... The Aimak (or Eimak, Aimaq) are Persian-speaking nomadic or semi-nomadic tribes of mixed Iranian and Mongolian stock inhabiting the north and north-west Afghan highlands immediately to the north of Herat. ... Persianization or Persianisation is a term used to describe a cultural change in which something non-Persian (or Iranian) is made to become Persian (or Iranian) It is commonly used in connection with Kurds, Arabs, as well as various Turkic peoples. ... For other uses, see Mongols (disambiguation). ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ...


History

See also: Persian Empire and History of Iran

The Persians are descendents of the Aryan (Indo-Iranian) tribes that began migrating from Central Asia into what is now Iran in the second millennium BC.[18][19][20] The Persian language and other Iranian tongues emerged as these Aryan tribes split up into two major groups, the Persians and the Medes, and intermarried with peoples indigenous to the Iranian plateau such as the Elamites.[21][22] The first mention of the Persians dates to the 9th century BC, when they appear as the Parsu in Assyrian sources, as a people living at the southeastern shores of Lake Urmia. Persia redirects here. ... edit Geographical extent of Iranian influence in the 1st century BCE. The Parthian Empire (mostly Western Iranian) is shown in red, other areas, dominated by Scythia (mostly Eastern Iranian), in orange. ... Aryan (/eərjən/ or /ɑːrjən/, Sanskrit: ) is a Sanskrit and Avestan word meaning noble/spiritual one. ... Map of the Sintashta-Petrovka culture (red), its expansion into the Andronovo culture during the 2nd millennium BC, showing the overlap with the BMAC in the south. ... Farsi redirects here. ... The Iranian languages are a branch of the Indo-European language family. ... Mede nobility. ... The term indigenous peoples has no universal, standard or fixed definition, but can be used about any ethnic group who inhabit the geographic region with which they have the earliest historical connection. ... Topographic map of the Iranian plateau connecting to Anatolia in the west and Hindu Kush and Himalaya in the east Iranian plateau is both a geographical area of South or West Asia, home of ancient civilizations[1], and a geological area of Eurasia north of the great folded mountain belts... Elam (Persian: تمدن ایلام) is one of the oldest recorded civilizations. ... blah ... Lake Urmia (Persian: دریاچه ارومیه) is a salt lake in northwestern Iran between the provinces of East Azarbaijan and West Azarbaijan, west of the southern portion of the similarly shaped Caspian Sea. ...

Achaemenid Empire at greatest extent.
Achaemenid Empire at greatest extent.

The ancient Persians from the province of Pars became the rulers of a large empire under the Achaemenid dynasty (Hakhamaneshiyan) in the sixth century BC, reuniting with the tribes and other provinces of the ancient Iranian plateau and forming the Persian Empire. Over the centuries Persia was ruled by various dynasties; some of them were ethnic Iranians including the Achaemenids, Parthians (Ashkanian), Sassanids (Sassanian), Buwayhids and Samanids, and some of them were not, such as the Seleucids, Ummayyads, Abbasids, and Seljuk Turks. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1676x869, 503 KB) Note : Inspired by Historical Atlas of Georges Duby (p. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1676x869, 503 KB) Note : Inspired by Historical Atlas of Georges Duby (p. ... The Persepolis Ruins The Achaemenid dynasty (Old Persian:Hakamanishiya, Persian: هخامنشیان) - was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire. ... Topographic map of the Iranian plateau connecting to Anatolia in the west and Hindu Kush and Himalaya in the east Iranian plateau is both a geographical area of South or West Asia, home of ancient civilizations[1], and a geological area of Eurasia north of the great folded mountain belts... Persia redirects here. ... Persia redirects here. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... Reproduction of a Parthian warrior as depicted on Trajans Column The Parthian Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BCE and 224 CE. Origins Bust of Parthian soldier, Esgh-abad Museum, Turkmenia. ... The Sassanid Empire in the time of Shapur I; the conquest of Cappadocia was temporary Official language Pahlavi (Middle Persian) Dominant Religion Zoroastrianism Capital Ctesiphon Sovereigns Shahanshah of the Iran (Eranshahr) First Ruler Ardashir I Last Ruler Yazdegerd III Establishment 224 AD Dissolution 651 AD Part of the History of... The Buwayhids or Buyyids or Ä€l-i Buyeh, were a Yazdani tribal confederation from Daylam, a region on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. ... The Samanids (875-999) (in Persian: Samanian) were a Persian dynasty in Central Asia and eastern Iran, named after its founder Saman Khoda. ... After the death of Alexander the Great in the afternoon of 11 June 323 BC, his empire was divided by his generals, the Diadochi(successors). ... The Umayyad Dynasty (Arabic الأمويون / بنو أمية umawiyy; in Turkish, Emevi) was the first dynasty of caliphs of the Prophet Muhammad who were not closely related to Muhammad himself, though they were of the same Meccan tribe, the Quraish. ... Mashriq Dynasties  Maghrib Dynasties  The Abbasid Caliphate Abbasid (Arabic: , ) is the dynastic name generally given to the caliph of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Arab Empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs from all but Spain. ... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of...


The founding dynasty of the empire, the Achaemenids, and later the Sassanids, were from the southern region of Iran, Pars. The latter Parthian dynasty arose from the north. However, according to archaeological evidence found in modern day Iran in the form of cuneiforms that go back to the Achaemenid era, it is evident that the native name of Parsa (Persia) had been applied to Iran from its birth.[23][24] Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... Head of king Shapur II (Sasanian dynasty A.D. 4th century). ... Fārs (Persian: فارس) is one of the 30 provinces of Iran. ... Parthia at its greatest extent under Mithridates II (123–88 BC) Capital Ctesiphon, Ecbatana Government Monarchy [[Category:Former monarchies}}|Parthia, 247 BC]] History  - Established 247 BC  - Disestablished 220 AD Parthian votive relief. ... Look up Cuneiform in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Persian language

Main article: Persian language

The Persian language is one of the world's oldest languages still in use today, and is known to have one of the most powerful literary traditions, with formidable Persian poets like Ferdowsi, Hafez, Khayyam, Attar, Saadi, Nezami, Roudaki, Rumi and Sanai. By native speakers as well as in Urdu, Arabic and other neighboring languages, it is called Fārsī, and additionally Dari or Tajiki in the eastern parts of Greater Iran. It is part of the Iranian sub-section of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European family of languages. Persian-speakers are today in the majority in Iran, where they speak the western dialect, Tajikistan, and Afghanistan,[25] and form a large minority in Uzbekistan as well, where they speak the eastern dialect (Dari or Tajiki). Smaller groups of Persian-speakers are found in Pakistan, western China (Xinjiang), as well as in the UAE, Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman and Azerbaijan. Farsi redirects here. ... Tomb of Ferdowsi in Tus HakÄ«m Abol-Qāsem FerdowsÄ« TÅ«sÄ« (Persian: ), more commonly transliterated as Ferdowsi, (935–1020) was a highly revered Persian poet. ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ... Mohammed Zahur Khayyam, better known as Khayyam is an indian music composer whose career spanned across 4 decades (1953 - 1990). ... Farid al-Din Attar (b. ... Saadi may refer to one of the following: Saadi (poet), the medieval Persian Sufi poet Saadi Dynasty, the Moroccan dynasty Vicente Saadi, the Argentine politician Saïd Sadi, the Algerian political activist Abd ar-Rahman as-Saadi, Islamic scholar of fiqh and tafsir Category: ... Nezami (1141–1209) Nezāmi-ye GanjavÄ« (Persian: ; Azerbaijani: ;‎ 1141 – 1209), or NezāmÄ« (Persian: ), whose full name was Nizām ad-DÄ«n AbÅ« Muhammad Ilyās ibn-YusÅ«f ibn-ZakÄ« ibn-Muayyid, is considered the greatest romantic epic poet in Persian literature, who brought a colloquial... Rudaki depicted as a blind poet, here on this Iranian stamp. ... Rumi (born November 29, 1982) is a Persian-Canadian Singer-songwriter and a Photographer who is currently based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Dari (Persian: ) is the official name for the Persian language in Afghanistan, popularly and locally known as Farsi. ... Tajik or Tadjik (тоҷикӣ, تاجیکی, tojikí) is a descendant of the Persian language spoken in Central Asia. ... After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      Greater Iran (in Persian: Irān-e Bozorg, or Irān-zamÄ«n; the Encyclopedia Iranica uses the term Iranian Cultural Continent[1]) is a term for the Iranian plateau in addition to... Indo-Iranian can refer to: The Indo-Iranian languages The prehistoric Indo-Iranian people, see Aryan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... For other uses, see Indo-European. ... For the county in Shanxi province, see Xinjiang County. ... UAE redirects here; for other uses of that term, see UAE (disambiguation) The United Arab Emirates is an oil-rich country situated in the south-east of the Arabian Peninsula in Southwest Asia, comprising seven emirates: Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujairah, Ras al-Khaimah, Sharjah and Umm al-Quwain. ...


Religion

The entrance to Shah Mosque (aka Imam Mosque or Shah Jame' Mosque) in Isfahan. This mosque is an example of Persian architecture during the Safavid dynasty.
The entrance to Shah Mosque (aka Imam Mosque or Shah Jame' Mosque) in Isfahan. This mosque is an example of Persian architecture during the Safavid dynasty.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 260 KB) Beschreibung Friday Mosque in Isfahan, lokated at the place Meidan-e-Imam. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 260 KB) Beschreibung Friday Mosque in Isfahan, lokated at the place Meidan-e-Imam. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Safavid Empire at its Greatest Extent After Islamic Conquest  Modern SSR = Soviet Socialist Republic Afghanistan  Azerbaijan  Bahrain  Iran  Iraq  Tajikistan  Uzbekistan  This box:      The Safavids (Persian: ; Azerbaijani: ) were an Iranian[1] Shia dynasty of mixed Azerbaijani[2] and Kurdish[3] origins, which ruled Persia from 1501/1502 to 1722. ...

History

The Persian civilization spawned three major religions: Zoroastrianism, Manichaeanism, and the Bahá'í Faith. Other religions such as Mazdakism and Manichaenism also arose from ancient Iran, with the former having been dubbed the first communistic ideology, and the latter heavily influencing Saint Augustine, hence, indirectly influencing Christianity: Both religions were sub-branches of Zoroastrianism. The religion of Zoroastrianism originates from ancient Persia. Zoroastrianism is said to be the first monotheistic religion. Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ... St. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Monotheism (in Greek monon = single and Theos = God) is the belief in a single, universal, all-encompassing deity. ...


Most Persians in Iran are Shia Muslims, while some communities of Shia Sufis also exist. There is also a sizeable number of Sunni Muslims. Historically, some of the greatest Sunni Muslim scholars were Persian or had Persian descent, including Abu Dawood, Al Muslim, Hakim al-Nishaburi, Al-Tabarani, Ghazali, Imam Bukhari, Tirmidhi, Al-Nasa'i and Abu Hanifa, amongst many others. There are also smaller communities of Zoroastrians, Christians, Jews, and Bahá'ís. The Bahá'í in Iran is the largest non-Muslim religious minority, larger in number than the Jewish, Christian and Zoroastrian communities combined[citation needed]. There are also Persians who are atheist and agnostic. Also see religious minorities in Iran. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sufism is a mystic tradition within Islam that encompasses a diverse range of beliefs and practices dedicated to Divine love and the cultivation of the elements of the Divine within the individual human being. ... Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Abu Daud or Abu Dawod, full name Abu Daud Sulayman ibn Ash`ath al-Azadi al-Sijistani, was a noted collector of hadith (sayings of Muhammad), and wrote the third of the six canonical hadith collections recognized by Sunni Muslims, Sunan Abi Daud. ... Abul Husayn Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj Qushayri al-Nisaburi (Arabic: أبو الحسين مسلم بن الحجاج القشيري النيسابوري) (born 204 A.H. - 261 (or 268?) A.H/ 875), Muslim Author of the second most widely recognized collection of Hadith in Sunni Islam. ... Abu Abd-Allah Muhammad ibn Abd-Allah al-Hakim al-Nishaburi (d. ... Sulaiman bin Ahmad bin Ayub bin Mutair Al-Lakhmi At-Tabarani was born sometime in 260 AH. He narrated numerous ahadeeth. ... Abu Hamid Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazali (born 1058 in Tus, Khorasan province of Persia, modern day Iran, died 1111, Tus) was a Persian Muslim theologian and philosopher, known as Algazel to the western medieval world. ... Muhammad Ibn Ismail Ibn Ibrahim Ibn al-Mughirah Ibn Bardizbah al-Bukhari محمد بن اسماعيل بن ابراهيم بن المغيرة بن بردزبه البخاري (born 810 - died 870), Arabic author of the most generally accepted collection of traditions (Hadith) from Muhammad, was born at Bokhara (Bukharä), of an Iranian family, in AH... Al-Tirmidhi, full name Abu Isa Muhammad ibn Isa ibn Musa ibn al-Dahhak al-Sulami al-Tirmidhi (824-892, ie 209 AH - 13 Rajab 279 AH) was a medieval collector of hadith (sayings of Muhammad), who wrote the Jami at-Tirmidhi, one of the six canonical hadith compilations used... Al-Nasāī, full name Aḥmad ibn Shu`ayb ibn Alī ibn Sīnān Abū `Abd ar-Raḥmān al-Nasāī, was a noted collector of hadith (sayings of Muhammad), and wrote one of the six canonical hadith collections recognized by Sunni Muslims, al-Sunan al-ṣughrā, as well as 15... Imam Abu Hanifa (699 - 765) was an important Islamic scholar and jurist and is considered the founder of the Hanifi school of fiqh. ... Zoroastrianism is the religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ... Atheist redirects here. ... Agnosticism (from the Greek a, meaning without, and gnosticism or gnosis, meaning knowledge) is the philosophical view that the truth value of certain claims—particularly metaphysical claims regarding theology, afterlife or the existence of God, gods, deities, or even ultimate reality—is unknown or, depending on the form of agnosticism... Map showing ethnic and religious diversity among the population of Iran. ...


Arts

Main article: Persian art

The artistic heritage of Persia is eclectic and includes major contributions from both east and west. Persian art borrowed heavily from the indigenous Elamite civilization and Mesopotamia and later from Hellenism (as can be seen with statues from the Greek period). In addition, due to Persia's somewhat central location, it has served as a fusion point between eastern and western arts and architecture as Greco-Roman influence was often fused with ideas and techniques from India and China. When talking of the creative Persian arts one has to include a geographic area that actually extends into Central Asia, the Caucasus, Asia Minor, and Iraq as well as modern Iran. This vast geographic region has been pivotal in the development of the Persian arts as a whole. Iran is filled with tombs of poets and musicians, such as this one belonging to Rahi Moayeri. ... Elam (Persian: تمدن ایلام) is one of the oldest recorded civilizations. ... Mesopotamia was a cradle of civilization geographically located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, largely corresponding to modern-day Iraq. ... The term Hellenistic (derived from Héllēn, the Greeks traditional self-described ethnic name) was established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen to refer to the spreading of Greek culture over the non-Greek people that were conquered by Alexander the Great. ...


Statues

Main article: Persian miniature

Persians' artistic expression can be seen as far back as the Achaemenid period as numerous statues depicting various important figures, usually of political significance as well as religious, such as the Immortals (elite troops of the emperor) are indicative of the influence of Mesopotamia and ancient Babylon. What is perhaps most representative of a more indigenous artistic expression are Persian miniatures. Although the influence of Chinese art is apparent, local Persian artists used the art form in various ways including portraits that could be seen from the Ottoman Empire to the courts of the Safavids and Mughals. Safavid era Miniature painting kept at Shah Abbas Hotel in Isfahan. ... Achaemenid Empire The Achaemenid Dynasty was a dynasty in the ancient Persian Empire, including Cyrus II the Great, Darius I and Xerxes I. At the height of their power, the Achaemenid rulers of Persia ruled over territories roughly emcompassing some parts of todays Iraq, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Israel, Lebanon... A Persian Immortal wielding a spear, wicker shield, dagger, and bow. ... The themes of Persian miniature are mostly related to the Persian mythology and poetry. ... Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum. ... Ottoman redirects here. ... The Safavid Empire at its 1512 borders. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ...


Music

Main article: Persian Music

The music of Persia goes back to the days of Barbod in the royal Sassanid courts, and even earlier. As it evolved, a distinct eastern Mediterranean style emerged as Persian folk music is often quite similar to the music of modern Iran's neighbors. In modern times, musical tradition has seen setbacks due to the religious government's policies in Iran, but has survived in the form of Iranian exiles and dissidents who have turned to Western rock music with a distinctive Iranian style as well as Persian rap. Moosiqi Asil or Persian music is the traditional and indigenous music of Persia and Persian-speaking countries: musiqi, the science and art of music, and moosiqi, the sound and performance of music (Sakata 1983). ... Sassanid Empire at its greatest extent The Sassanid dynasty (also Sassanian) was the name given to the kings of Persia during the era of the second Persian Empire, from 224 until 651, when the last Sassanid shah, Yazdegerd III, lost a 14-year struggle to drive out the Umayyad Caliphate... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... موسیقی رپ ایرانی Languages Persian, English, German Awards Tehran Underground Music Festival Charts none Festivals Tehran Underground Music Festival Iranian Online Rap Radio Stations Zirzamin Online Media Tehran Avenue, Zirzamine, Cafe Tehran, RaPersian Freestyle Rapper Community Major Iranian bands Deev–Eblis–EMZipper–Erfan–Hich Kas–Zedbazi– Salome Iranian hip hop is hip hop...


Architecture

Main article: Persian architecture
The ruins of Persepolis known as the Takht-e Jamshid or throne of Jamshid is part of the ancient architectural tradition of Persia.
The ruins of Persepolis known as the Takht-e Jamshid or throne of Jamshid is part of the ancient architectural tradition of Persia.

Architecture is one of the areas where Persians have made outstanding contributions. Ancient examples can be seen in the ruins at Persepolis, while in modern times monuments such as the Tomb of Omar Khayyam are displays of the varied tradition in Persia. Various cities in Iran are historical displays of a distinctive Persian style that can be seen in the Kharaghan twin towers of Qazvin province and the Shah Mosque found in Isfahan. Persian architecture streams over the borders of Iran and is clearly seen throughout Central Asia as with the Bibi Khanum Mosque in Samarkand as well as Samanids mausoleum in Bukhara and the Minaret of Jam in western Afghanistan. Islamic architecture was founded on the base established by the Persians. Persian techniques can also be clearly seen in the structures of the Taj Mahal at Agra and the Blue Mosque in Istanbul. The Baháí House of Worship by Fariborz Sahba, also known as the Lotus Temple. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (597x606, 122 KB) This photo was taken by Asana Mashouf If used outside Wikipedia, please credit: Photo by Asana Mashouf Persepolis File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (597x606, 122 KB) This photo was taken by Asana Mashouf If used outside Wikipedia, please credit: Photo by Asana Mashouf Persepolis File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the ancient city. ... This article is about the ancient city. ... Tomb of Omar Khayam, Neishapur, Iran. ... Shah Mosque is a mosque in Isfahan,Iran standing in soyth side of Naghsh-i Jahan square. ... Samarkand (Tajik: Самарқанд, Persian: ‎ , Uzbek: , Russian: ), population 412,300 in 2005, is the second-largest city in Uzbekistan and the capital of Samarqand Province. ... The Samanid dynasty (819-999) was a Persian dynasty in Central Asia, named after its founder Saman Khuda. ... Bukhara (Tajik: Бухоро; Persian: , Buxârâ; Uzbek: ; Russian: ), from the Soghdian βuxārak (lucky place), is the fifth-largest city in Uzbekistan, and capital of the Bukhara Province (viloyat). ... The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. ... For other uses, see Taj Mahal (disambiguation). ... The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul The Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is a mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). ...


Rugs

Main article: Persian rug

Gottfried Semper called rugs "the original means of separating space". Rug weaving was thus developed by ancient civilizations as a basis of architecture. Persian rugs are said to be the most detailed hand-made works of art. A traditional craftsman mending a rug in Isfahan. ... Gottfried Semper Gottfried Semper (1803-1879) was a German architect, art critic, and professor of architecture, who designed and built the Semper Oper in Dresden between 1838 and 1841. ...


Gardens

Main article: Persian Gardens

The Persian gardens were designed to reflect paradise on earth;[citation needed] The English word paradise is thought to come from the Persian word Pardis, which refers to these gardens. Art depicting two men in a Persian Garden Persian Gardens refers to a tradition and style of garden design which originated in Persia (more commonly known today as Iran). ...


Although having existed since ancient times, the Persian garden gained greater prominence during the Islamic period as Arab rulers cultivated Persian techniques to create gardens of Persian design from Al-Andalus to Kashgar.[citation needed] Persian gardens are immortalized in the One Thousand and One Nights and the works of Omar Khayyam. Al-Andalus is the Arabic name given the Iberian Peninsula by its Muslim conquerors; it refers to both the Caliphate proper and the general period of Muslim rule (711–1492). ... Location of Kashgar Kashgars Sunday market Kashgar (also spelled Cascar[1]) (Uyghur: /; Chinese: ; pinyin: , ), is an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar. ... Tomb of Omar Khayam, Neishapur, Iran. ...


Women

Main article: Iranian women

Persian women have played an important role throughout history. Scheherazade, though fictional, is an important figure of female wit and intelligence, while the beauty of Mumtaz Mahal inspired the building of the Taj Mahal itself. While in ancient times, aristocratic females possessed numerous rights sometimes on par with men, generally Persian women did not attain greater parity until the 20th century. However, Táhirih, the poet, had a great influence on modern women's movements throughout the Middle East. The Táhirih Justice Center is named after her. Females were given such status in ancient Persia that they were the first to ever serve in a national military.[citation needed] 17th century painting of Safavi Iranian royal court depicting woman pouring wine at Chehel Sotoon Palace, Esfahan. ... Queen Scheherazade tells her stories to King Shahryar. ... Artistic depiction of Mumtaz Mahal Mumtāz Mahal (Persian: ممتاز محل, meaning beloved ornament of the palace; pronunciation //) is the common nickname of Arjumand Banu Begum, who was born in April of 1593 in Agra, India. ... For other uses, see Taj Mahal (disambiguation). ... Táhirih (Arabic: ‎ The Pure One) or Qurratul-`Ayn (Arabic: ‎ Comfort of the Eyes) are both titles of Fátimih Baraghání (b. ...


Persian women today serve an active role in society. Persian women today tend to take a more active role in social, religious and family affairs than their Arab counterparts.[citation needed] Persian women can be seen working in a variety of areas such as politics, law enforcement, transportation industries, etc. Universities still tend to be dominated by women in Iran and one may find a large number of female legislators in the Iranian Majlis (parliament),[citation needed] even by western standards. Former Vice President Masoumeh Ebtekar, noted for her eloquence in dealing with western media, set a new standard for aspiring Iranian female politicians while serving under President Khatami. Outstanding Iranian female academics, such as Laleh Bakhtiar have forever left a mark in the fields they contribute to. Masoumeh Ebtekar (Persian: معصومه ابتکار; born 1960) is an Iranian scientist and politician. ...


Culture

Main article: Culture of Iran

Persian culture can be defined through its through the medium of films as Persian cinema has attained a substantial amount of international and critical acclaim through such films as Children of Heaven and Taste of Cherry, which give both insights into the current state of Persian culture and profound depictions of the general human condition. Safavid era painting kept at The Grand Shah Abbas Caravanserai Hotel in Isfahan. ... The cinema of Iran (or Persian cinema) is a flourishing film industry with a long history. ... Children of Heaven is a 1997 Iranian film. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ...


See also

This article is about Iranians, the citizens of Iran, regardless of their ethnic group or religious affiliations. ... Ethnolinguistic groups in Iran Irans population was declared 70,049,262 in 2006 census. ... edit Geographical extent of Iranian influence in the 1st century BCE. The Parthian Empire (mostly Western Iranian) is shown in red, other areas, dominated by Scythia (mostly Eastern Iranian), in orange. ... Iranian Americans (or Persian Americans) are Americans of Iranian (Persian) descent, including those who are expatriates in exile or permanent immigrants. ... Iranian-Australians (sometimes called Persian-Australians) are Australians of Iranian descent, including those who are expatriates in exile or permanent immigrants. ... Iranian Kuwaiti Girls Iranian immigration to the Arabian Peninsula has been continuous and very rapid since the fall of the third Persian Empire, that is from the rule of Nader Shah to the rule of the Qajar dynasty. ... This is a list of notable Iranians: // Nazanin Afshin-Jam, 2nd place, Miss World 2003; Miss Canada 2003. ... Language(s) Persian (varieties of Dari and Tajiki) Religion(s) Islam (predominantly Sunni, with sizable Ithna Ashari and Ismaili minorities) Tājīk (Persian: ; UniPers: Tâjik; Tajik: ) is a term generally applied to Persian-speaking peoples of Iranian origin living east of Iran. ... Fārsīwān or Pārsīwān (Persian-speakers), or simply Pārsī (Persians), is another term often used for urbanized Tajiks of Afghanistan and Pakistan. ... Turko-Iranian can refer to: The Turkic speaking minorities of Iran, can also be called as Iranian Turks, e. ... Language(s) Persian, Kurdish, Pashto, Balouchi, Ossetian and various other Iranian languages. ... Look up Persian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Irani is a term used to denote Indian Zoroastrians whose ancestors emigrated from Iran within the last two centuries, as opposed to the longer residing Parsis. ... This article is about the Parsi community. ... Nākhudā (when Anglicised, also written Naghdeh, Nakhooda, Nakhoda, Nakoda and Nacoda) is a term originating from the Persian language which literally means Captain. ...

References

  1. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Iran
  2. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Iran
  3. ^ Country Briefings Economist.com, Factsheet. Retrieved on 2007-12-20.
  4. ^ American FactFinder
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k The Persian Diaspora
  6. ^ Travel Video Television News - Iranians investing heavily in Dubai
  7. ^ Ethnologue report for language code:pes
  8. ^ wo.org/Disporia.htm Iranian World Outreach - Iranian -speaking people outside of Iran
  9. ^ Ethnologue report for language code:pes
  10. ^ Ethnologue 14 report for Bahrain
  11. ^ Gernot L. Windfuhr, Persian Grammar: History and State of Its Study, Walter de Gruyter, 1979, pp4
  12. ^ CIA - The World Factbook - Iran
  13. ^ http://www.aljazeera.com/me.asp?service_ID=12883
  14. ^ Lands of Iran Encyclopedia Iranica (July 25, 2005) (retrieved 3 March 2008)
  15. ^ Treaty of Turkmenchay , Treaty of Gulistan and Anglo-Persian War
  16. ^ Abdolhossein Zarinkoob "Ruzgaran : tarikh-e Iran az aghaz ta soqut-e saltnat-e Pahlevi" pp. 37
  17. ^ Bahman Firuzmandi "Mad, Hakhamaneshi, Ashkani, Sasani" pp. 155
  18. ^ Iran :: Ethnic groups - Britannica Online Encyclopedia
  19. ^ The Medes and the Persians, c.1500-559 from The Encyclopedia of World History Sixth Edition, Peter N. Stearns (general editor), © 2001 The Houghton Mifflin Company, at Bartleby.com.
  20. ^ Bahman Firuzmandi "Mad, Hakhamanishi, Ashkani, Sasani" pp. 20
  21. ^ Iran. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
  22. ^ Bahman Firuzmandi "Mad, Hakhamanishi, Ashkani, Sasani" pp. 12-19
  23. ^ Persia - Britannica Concise Encyclopedia
  24. ^ The Splendor of Persia: The Land and the People - by Robert Payne
  25. ^ BBC News - Afghan poll's ethnic battleground

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Russia-Persia borders before and after the treaty The Treaty of Turkmenchay (Russian: Туркманчайский договор; Persian: عهدنامه ترکمنچای) was a treaty negotiated in Turkmenchay by which the Persian Empire, more commonly known today as Iran, recognized Russian suzerainty over the Erivan khanate, Nakhchivan khanate and the remainder of the Talysh khanate, establishing the Aras... Russia-Persia borders before and after the treaty The Treaty of Gulistan (Russian: Гюлистанский договор; Persian: عهدنامه گلستان) was a peace treaty concluded between Imperial Russia and Persia on October 24, 1813 in the village of Gulistan in Karabakh as a result of the first Russo-Persian War. ... Combatants Britain Persia Commanders Major General Sir James Outram The Anglo-Persian War lasted between November 1, 1856 and March 4, 1857, and was fought between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Persia (which was at the time ruled by the Qajar dynasty). ... The Encyclopedia of World History is a classic single volume work detailing world history. ... Bartleby. ...

External links

  • Ethnologue's entry for Western Persian
Image File history File links Iran_tricolour. ...

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m