FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Persecution of Hindus
Part of a series on
Hinduism
History · Deities
Denominations · Hindu Literature
Beliefs & practices
Dharma · Artha
Kama · Moksha
Karma · Samsara
Yoga · Bhakti
Maya · Puja · Mandir
Scriptures
Vedas · Upanishads
Ramayana · Mahabharata
Bhagavad Gita · Purana
Bibliography
Related topics
Hinduism by country
Leaders · Reforms
Ayurveda · Jyotisha
Calendar · Hindu festivals
Glossary · Criticism


Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Hinduism is the worlds oldest religion in the world. ... Within Hinduism a large number of personalities, or forms, are worshipped as deities or murtis. ... Hinduism encompasses many movements and schools fairly organized within Hindu denominations. ... Hindu mythology is a term used by modern scholarship for a large body of Indian literature that details the lives and times of legendary personalities, deities and divine incarnations on earth interspersed with often large sections of philosophical and ethical discourse. ... Hindu philosophy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... Artha is a Sanskrit term referring to the idea of material prosperity. ... Kāma (Skt. ... Moksha - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Karma is a concept in Hinduism, based on the Vedas and Upanishads, which explains causality through a system where beneficial events are derived from past beneficial actions and harmful events from past harmful actions, creating a system of actions and reactions throughout a persons reincarnated lives. ... For other uses, see Samsara (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yoga (disambiguation). ... Bhakti (DevanāgarÄ«: भक्ति) is a word of Sanskrit origin meaning devotion and also the path of devotion itself, as in Bhakti-Yoga. ... Maya (illusion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A puja as performed in Ujjain during the Monsoon on the banks of the overflowing river Shipra. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... Template:Hindu scriptures - Vedic Scriptures Hindu scripture, which is known as Shastra is predominantly written in Sanskrit. ... Veda redirects here. ... The Upanishads (उपनिषद्, Upanişad) are part of the Hindu Shruti scriptures which primarily discuss meditation and philosophy and are seen as religious instructions by most schools of Hinduism. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ... The Puranas are part of Hindu Smriti; these religious scriptures discuss devotion and mythology. ... The following is a bibliography of Hindu scriptures and texts. ... Hinduism - Percentage by country The percentage of Hindu population of each country was taken from the US State Departments International Religious Freedom Report 2004. ... These are some of the most noteworthy Gurus and Saints of Hinduism: A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada Adi Shankara Amritanandamayi Baba Lokenath Brahmachari Bhakti Vaibhava Puri Maharaj Bhagawan Nityananda Bhagwan Swaminarayan Chinmayananda Gurumayi Chidvilasananda Lahiri Mahasaya Madhvacharya Mahavatar Babaji Mother Meera Muktananda Narayana Guru Nimbarka Nisargadatta Maharaj Raghavendra Swami Ramakrishna... Hinduism is going through a phase of regeneration and reform through the vehicle of several contemporary movements, collectively termed as Hindu reform movements. ... Shirodhara, one of the techniques of Ayurveda Ayurveda (Devanagari: ) or Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient system of health care that is native to the Indian subcontinent. ... Jyotisha (, in Hindi and English usage Jyotish; sometimes called Hindu astrology, Indian astrology, and/or Vedic astrology) is the Hindu system of astrology, one of the six disciplines of Vedanga, and regarded as one of the oldest schools of ancient astrology to have had an independent origin, affecting all other... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... Glossary of terms in Hinduism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

Persecution of Hindus refers to the religious persecution inflicted upon Hindus. Hindus have been historically persecuted during Islamic rule of the Indian subcontinent and during Portuguese rule of Goa. In modern times, Hindus in Kashmir, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Uganda and Fiji have also suffered persecution. Persecution of Hindus during Islamic rule was conducted through massive "ethnic cleansing", forced religious conversion, enslavement, desecration and demolition of Hindu temples and ashrams.[citation needed] Christian persecution of Hindus in Goa during Portuguese rule, included the defamation of Hinduism through forced conversions, burnings, mass-rapes of Hindu women (and the sexual abuse of Hindu children), lootings, and other violent means. Persecution also extended to the confiscation or destruction of private Hindu property, or the incitement of violence through propaganda. Religious persecution is systematic mistreatment of an individual or group due to their religious affiliation. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Map of South Asia (see note) This article deals with the geophysical region in Asia. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... Ethnic cleansing refers to various policies or practices aimed at the displacement of an ethnic group from a particular territory in order to create a supposedly ethnically pure society. ... Slave redirects here. ... The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... Ashrams in ancient India, were Hindu hermitages where sages used to live in peace and tranquility amidst nature. ... St. ... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... Slander and Libel redirect here. ...

Contents

During Islamic rule of the Indian sub-continent

The Muslim conquest of the Indian subcontinent led to widespread carnage because Muslims regarded the Hindus as infidels and therefore slaughtered and converted millions of Hindus. Will Durant argued in his 1935 book "The Story of Civilization: Our Oriental Heritage" (page 459): The Muslim conquest of the Indian subcontinent took place during the ascendancy of the Rajput Kingdoms in North India, during the 7th to the 12th centuries. ... The term Kaffir applies to various black nationalities inhabitting Southern Africa, and is today used as a derogatory term in South Africa. ... Will Durant William James Durant (November 5, 1885–November 7, 1981) was an American philosopher, historian, and writer. ...

The Mohammedan conquest of India is probably the bloodiest story in history. The Islamic historians and scholars have recorded with great glee and pride the slaughters of Hindus, forced conversions, abduction of Hindu women and children to slave markets and the destruction of temples carried out by the warriors of Islam during 800 AD to 1700 AD. Millions of Hindus were converted to Islam by sword during this period.
Religious discrimination
and persecution
By victimized group:

African religions · Atheists
Bahá'ís · Buddhists · Cathars
Religion in China · Christians
Hellenistic religions · Hindus · Jews
Mormons · Muslims · Neopagans
Rastafari · Sikhs · Zoroastrians Religious discrimination is valuing or treating a person or group differently because of what they do or do not believe. ... Religious persecution is systematic mistreatment of an individual or group due to their religious affiliation. ... Contrary to popular belief, the Africans enslaved to build the economic foundation of America were not Christians. ... Many atheists have experienced persecution, mainly from Christians and Muslims. ... The persecution of Baháís refers to the religious persecution of Baháís in various countries, especially in Iran, the nation of origin of the Baháí Faith, Irans largest religious minority and the location of one of the largest Baháí populations in the world. ... Many Buddhists have experienced persecution from non-Buddhists during the history of Buddhism. ... Cathars being expelled from Carcassonne in 1209. ... Chinese monk lighting incense in a temple in Beijing. ... Spanish Leftists during the Red Terror Shoot at a statue of Christ The persecution of Christians is the religious persecution that Christians have endured as a consequence of professing their faith, both historically and in the current era. ... The Hellenistic religion at the time of the Constantinian shift consisted mainly of two main currents, the official Roman imperial cult various Mystery religions Christianity grew gradually in Rome and the Roman empire. ... An anti-Mormon political cartoon from the late nineteenth century. ... Conflicts between Muslims and non-Muslims made the persecution of both Muslims and non-Muslims a recurring phenomenon during the history of Islam. ... Religious discrimination against adherents of various neopagan denominations. ... Persecution of members of the Rastafari movement, a group founded in Jamaica in the early 1930s and who worship Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia as Almighty God, has been fairly continuous since the movement began but nowadays is particularly concerning their spiritual use of cannabis, an illegal drug almost... A Sikh man wearing a turban The adherents of Sikhism are called Sikhs. ... The persecution of Zoroastrians has been common since the fall of the Sassanid Empire and the rule of Umayyad Arab empire that replaced it. ...

By method:

Anti-clericalism · Censorship
Genocide · Forced conversion · Pogrom
War · Discrimination · Fascism
Intolerance · Police · Terrorism
Segregation · Violence · Abuse
State atheism · State religion Anti-clericalism is a historical movement that opposes religious (generally Catholic) institutional power and influence in all aspects of public and political life, and the encroachment of religion in the everyday life of the citizen. ... Censorship by religion is a form of censorship where freedom of expression is controlled or limited using religious authority or on the basis of the teachings of the religion. ... Genocide is the deliberate and systematic destruction of an ethnic or national group. ... A forced conversion occurs when someone adopts a religion or philosophy under the threat that a refusal would result in negative non-spiritual consequences. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... For other uses of the term, see Holy War. ... Religious discrimination is valuing or treating a person or group differently because of what they do or do not believe. ... Religion and neo-fascism refers to the relationship between neo-fascism and religion. ... Religious intolerance is either intolerance motivated by ones own religious beliefs or intolerance against anothers religious beliefs or practices. ... Religious terrorism refers to terrorism justified or motivated by religion and is a form of religious violence. ... Religious segregation involves the separation of people on the basis of religion. ... Religious violence Throughout history, religious beliefs have provoked some believers into violence. ... The term Spiritual abuse was coined in the late twentieth century to refer to abusive or aberrational practices identified in the behavior and teachings of some churches, spiritual and religious organizations and groups. ... State atheism is the official rejection of religion in all forms by a government in favor of atheism. ... Nations with state religions:  Buddhism  Islam  Shia Islam  Sunni Islam  Orthodox Christianity  Protestantism  Roman Catholic Church A state religion (also called an official religion, established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. ...

Historical events

Dechristianisation in the French Revolution
Revolt in the Vendee · Cristero War
Red Terror · Red Terror in Spain
Cultural Revolution · Reign of Terror
Inquisition · Wars of Religion
St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre
Khmer Rouge · Pontic tragedy · Kulturkampf
Armenian Genocide · Assyrian Genocide
History of Communist Albania
The Dechristianisation of France during the French Revolution is a conventional description of the results of a number of separate policies, conducted by various governments of France between the start of the French Revolution in 1789 and the Concordat of 1801. ... During the French Revolution, the 1793-1796 uprising in the Vendée, variously known as the Uprising, Insurrection, Revolt, or Wars in the Vendée, was the largest internal counter-revolution to the new Republic. ... The struggle between church and state in Mexico broke out in armed conflict during the Cristero War (also known as the Cristiada) of 1926 to 1929. ... The Red Terror was a campaign of mass arrests and deportations targeted against counterrevolutionaries in Russia during the Russian Civil War. ... The Red Terror in Spain is the name given to the atrocities committed by the Republicans during the Spanish Civil War of the 1930s, when many of the Republican forces were violently anti-clerical anarchists and Communists, whose assaults included sacking and burning monasteries and churches and killing 6,832... The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution [1] in the Peoples Republic of China was a struggle for power within the Communist Party of China that manifested into wide-scale social, political, and economic chaos, which grew to include large sections of Chinese society and eventually brought the entire country to... For the Doctor Who British TV serial, see The Reign of Terror (Doctor Who). ... This article is about the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The French Wars of Religion were a series of conflicts fought between the Catholic League and the Huguenots from the middle of the sixteenth century to the Edict of Nantes in 1598. ... 19th century painting by François Dubois The St. ... Flag of Democratic Kampuchea Photos of genocide victims on display at the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum The Khmer Rouge (Khmer: ) was the ruling political party of Cambodia -- which it renamed to Democratic Kampuchea -- from 1975 to 1979. ... The historical Pontus region New York Times headlines which observes that the entire Christian population of Trabzon was wiped out. More relevant headlines[1] Ethnic groups in the Balkans and Asia Minor as of the early 20th Century (William R. Shepherd, Historical Atlas, 1911). ... The German term Kulturkampf (literally, culture struggle) refers to German policies in relation to secularity and the influence of the Roman Catholic Church, enacted from 1871 to 1878 by the Chancellor of the German Empire, Otto von Bismarck. ... Armenian Genocide photo. ... Bodies of Christians who perished during the Assyrian Genocide 40 Christians dying a day say Assyrian refugees - The Syracuse Herald, 1915. ... From 1945 until 1992 Albania had a Communist government. ...

This box: view  talk  edit

There is no official estimate of the total death toll of Hindus at the hands of Muslims. Estimates have stated that over 13 centuries and over the entire subcontinent, the number of Hindus who died at the hands of the Muslims goes up into the millions. On several occasions, the Bahmani sultans in central India (1347-1528) killed around 80,000-100,000 Hindus in a short period of time, which they set as a minimum goal, during their anti-Hindu campaigns[1] The Bahmani Sultanate was a Muslim state of the India. ...

The massacres perpetuated by Muslims in India are unparalleled in history, bigger than the Holocaust of the Jews by the Nazis; or the massacre of the Armenians by the Turks; more extensive even than the slaughter of the South American native populations by the invading Spanish and Portuguese.

As Braudel put it: "The levies it had to pay were so crushing that one catastrophic harvest was enough to unleash famines and epidemics capable of killing a million people at a time. Appalling poverty was the constant counterpart of the conquerors' opulence."


Prof. K.S. Lal, suggests a calculation in his book Growth of Muslim Population in Medieval India which estimates that between the years 1000 AD and 1500 AD the population of Hindus decreased by 80 million. Even those Hindus who converted to Islam were not immune from persecution, which was illustrated by the Muslim Caste System in India as established by Ziauddin al-Barani in the Fatawa-i Jahandari. [2], where they were regarded as "Ajlaf" caste and subjected to severe discrimination by the "Ashraf" castes[3]. K.S. Lal is a controversial Indian historian. ... Growth of Muslim Population in Medieval India (A.D. 1000-1800) is a book by K.S. Lal published in 1973. ... Caste system among South Asian Muslims refers to units of social stratification that have developed among Muslims in South Asia(largely the region that comprises India and Pakistan), despite Islams egalitarian tenets[1][2]. // Sources indicate that the castes among Muslims developed as the result of close contact with...


By Arabs

Muslim conquest of the Indian subcontinent began during the early 8th century, when the Umayyad governor of what is now Iraq, Hajjaj responded to a casus belli provided by the kidnapping of Muslim women and treasures by pirates off the coast of Debal,[4] by mobilizing an expedition of 6,000 cavalry under Muhammad bin-Qasim in 712 CE. Records from the campaign recorded in the Chach Nama record temple demolitions, and mass executions of resisting Sindhi forces and the enslavement of their dependents. This action was particularly extensive in Debal, of which Qasim is reported to have been under orders to make an example of while freeing both the captured women and the prisoners of a previous failed expedition. Bin Qasim then enlisted the support of the local Jat, Meds and Bhutto tribes and began the process of subduing and conquering the countryside. The capture of towns was also usually accomplished by means of a treaty with a party from among his "enemy", who were then extended special privileges and material rewards.[5] However, his superior Hajjaj reportedly objected to his method by saying that it would make him look weak and advocated a more hardline military strategy: [6] The Muslim conquest of the Indian subcontinent took place during the ascendancy of the Rajput Kingdoms in North India, during the 7th to the 12th centuries. ... The Courtyard of the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, one of the grandest architectural legacies of the Umayyads. ... Al-Hajjaj bin Yousef (661 - June in Taif, 714 in Wasit, Iraq) (Arabic: الحجاج بن يوسف also known as Al Hajjaj bin Yousef Al saqafe) was an important Arab administrator during the Umayyad caliphate. ... Casus belli is a modern Latin language expression meaning the justification for acts of war. ... Debal was a port located at modern Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not include all significant viewpoints. ... Chach Nama is a Muslim chronicle. ... Sindh (Sindhī: سنڌ, Urdū: سندھ) is one of the four provinces of Pakistan and historically is home to the Sindhis. ... Debal was a port located at modern Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan. ... The Jat people (IAST: , Hindi: , Punjabi: , Urdu: ‎) of Northern India and Pakistan, are descendants of Indo-Aryan/Indo-Scythian tribes. ... Meds is Placebos fifth album. ... Bhutto may refer to: Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (Also spelled Bhuto) was former Pakistani Prime Minister, deposed by General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq in 1970s. ...

It appears from your letter that all the rules made by you for the comfort and convenience of your men are strictly in accordance with religious law. But the way of granting pardon prescribed by the law is different from the one adopted by you, for you go on giving pardon to everybody, high or low, without any discretion between a friend and a foe. The great God says in the Koran [47.4]: "0 True believers, when you encounter the unbelievers, strike off their heads." The above command of the Great God is a great command and must be respected and followed. You should not be so fond of showing mercy, as to nullify the virtue of the act. Henceforth grant pardon to no one of the enemy and spare none of them, or else all will consider you a weak-minded man.

In a subsequent communication, Hajjaj reiterated that all able-bodied men were to be killed, and that their underage sons and daughters were to be imprisoned and retained as hostages. Qasim obeyed, and on his arrival at the town of Brahminabad massacred between 6,000 and 16,000 of the defending forces.[7]. The historian, Upendra Thakur records the persecution of Hindus and Buddhists:

When Muhammad Kasim invaded Sind in 711 AD, Buddhism had no resistance to offer to their fire and steel. The rosary could not be a match for the sword and the terms Love and Peace had no meaning to them. They carried fire and sword wherever they went and obliterated all that came their way. Muhammad triumphantly marched into the country, conquering Debal, Sehwan, Nerun, Brahmanadabad, Alor and Multan one after the other in quick succession, and in less than a year and a half, the far-flung Hindu kingdom was crushed, the great civilization fell back and Sind entered the darkest period of it's history. There was a fearful outbreak of religious bigotry in several places and temples were wantonly desecrated. At Debal, the Nairun and Aror temples were demolished and converted into mosques.[Resistors] were put to death and women made captives. The Jizya was exacted with special care.[Hindus] were required to feed Muslim travellers for three days and three nights.[8].

Other historians and archaeologists such as J E Lohuizen-de Leeuw, take the following stance regarding events preceding the sack of Debal:

In fact, we have clear evidence that the Arabs were very tolerant towards both Buddhists and Hindus during the rest of the campaign and throughout the time they ruled Sind...Of course that does not mean that no monuments were ever destroyed, for war always means a certain amount of damage to buildings but it does prove that there was no wanton and systematic destruction of each and every religious center of the Buddhists and Hindus in Sind.[9]

Mahmud of Ghazni

Mahmud of Ghazni was an Afghan Sultan who invaded the Indian subcontinent during the early 11th century. His campaigns across the gangetic plains are often cited for their iconoclastic plundering and destruction of Hindu temples such as those at Mathura and he looked upon their destruction as an act of "jihad"[10]. Mahmud and Ayaz The Sultan is to the right, shaking the hand of the sheykh, with Ayaz standing behind him. ... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... The Gangetic Plains are the part of the Ganges River (or River Ganga) that flows across Indias northern plains. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... , Mathura   (Hindi: मथुरा, Urdu: متھرا) is a holy city in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... For other uses, see Jihad (disambiguation). ...


Pradyumna Prasad Karan further describes Mahmud's invasion as one in which he put "thousands of Hindu's to the sword" and made a pastime of "raising pyramids of the skulls of the infidels".[11][12] Holt et al. hold an opposing view, that he was "no mere robber or bloody thirsty tyrant" . Mahmud shed no blood "except in the exegencies of war",[13] and was tolerant in dealings with his own Hindu subjects, some of whom rose to high posts in his administration, such as his Hindu General Tilak [13]


Mahmud of Ghazni sacked the second Somnath Temple in 1026, and looted it of gems and precious stones and the famous Shiva lingam of the temple was destroyed and it's fragments taken away to Ghazni where they were used as stepping stones for a mosque.[14] The Somnath Temple located in the Prabhas Kshetra near Veraval in Saurashtra, on the western coast of Gujarat, India is one of the twelve Jyotirlings (golden lingas) symbols of the God Shiva. ... For other uses, see Siva (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Shiva lingham stones be merged into this article or section. ...


In the Delhi Sultanate

The first Muslim Empire of India, the Sultanate of Delhi, was established in 1210 CE by Turkic tribes that invaded the subcontinent from Afghanistan. Many temples were looted and destroyed. Infamous cases include the destruction of the Somnath. The Delhi Sultanate, or Sulthanath-e-Hind/Sulthanath-e-Dilli refers to the various dynasties that ruled in India from 1210 to 1526. ... The Somnath Temple located in the Prabhas Kshetra near Veraval in Saurashtra, on the western coast of Gujarat, India is one of the twelve Jyotirlings (golden lingas) symbols of the God Shiva. ...


Muhammad Ghori

Muhammad Ghori committed genocide against Hindus at Koi (modern Aligarh), Kalinjar and Varanasi, according to Hasan Nizami's Taj-ul-Maasir, 20,000 Hindu prisoners were slaughtered and their heads offered to crows.[15] Muhammad of Ghor or Muhammad Ghori (originally named Muizz-ad-din) (1162 - 1206) was a Persian conqueror and sultan between 1171 and 1206. ... , Aligarh   (Hindi: अलीगढ़, Urdu: علی Ú¯Ú‘Ú¾) is a city in Aligarh District in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ...


Timur the Lame's Campaign against India

Main article: Timur

Tīmūr bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - Tēmōr, "iron") (1336 – February 1405), known in the West as Tamerlane, was a 14th century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent,[16][17][18][19] conqueror of much of western and central Asia, and founder of the Timurid Empire and Timurid dynasty (1370–1405) in Central Asia, which survived in some form until 1857. Perhaps, he is more commonly known by his pejorative Persian name Timur-e Lang (Persian: تیمور لنگ) which translates to Timur the Lame, as he was lame after sustaining an injury to the leg in battle. Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan TÄ«mÅ«r bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - TÄ“mōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405), known in the West as Tamerlane, was a 14th century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent,[1][2][3][4] conqueror of much of western and central Asia, and founder... The Chagatai language is an extinct Turkic language which was once widely spoken in Central Asia. ... For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ... A warlord is a person with power who has de facto military control of a subnational area due to armed forces loyal to the warlord and not to a central authority. ... The Turco-Mongols were the aristocratic, nomadic, mostly Turkic-speaking horsemen of Turkic and Mongolian descent who served as rulers and conquerors in Central and West Asias Turko-Persian societies during the Middle Ages. ... Timurid Dynasty at its Greatest Extent The Timurids (Chaghatay/Persian: - TÄ«mÅ«rÄ«yān), self-designated GurkānÄ« (Persian: ), were a Central Asian Sunni Muslim dynasty whose empire included the whole of Central Asia, Iran and modern Afghanistan, as well as large parts of Mesopotamia and Caucasus. ... Map of Central Asia showing three sets of possible boundaries for the region Central Asia located as a region of the world Central Asia is a vast landlocked region of Asia. ... “Farsi” redirects here. ...


Informed about civil war in India, Timur began a trek starting in 1397 to invade the territory of the reigning Sultan Nasir-u Din Mehmud of the Tughlaq Dynasty in the north Indian city of Delhi. Statue of Timur in Shahrisabz, Uzbekistan Tīmūr bin Taraghay Barlas (Chagatai Turkic: تیمور - Tēmōr, iron) (1336 – February 1405), known in the West as Tamerlane, was a 14th century warlord of Turco-Mongol descent,[1][2][3][4] conqueror of much of western and central Asia, and founder... Sultan (Arabic: سلطان) is an Islamic title, with several historical meanings. ... The Tughlaq Dynasty of north India started in 1321 CE in Delhi when Ghazi Tughlaq assumed the throne under the title of Ghiyath al-Din Tughluq. ... For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ...


Timur crossed the Indus River at Attock on September 24. The capture of towns and villages was often followed by the massacre of their inhabitants and the raping of their women, as well as pillaging to support his massive army. Timur wrote many times in his memoirs of his specific disdain for the 'idolatrous' Hindus, although he also waged war against Muslim Indians during his campaign. The Indus River (Urdu: Sindh; Sindhi: Sindhu; Sanskrit and Hindi: सिन्धु ; Persian: حندو ; Pashto: ّآباسنFather of Rivers; Tibetan: Lion River; Chinese: Yìndù; Greek: Ινδός Indos) is the longest and most important river in Pakistan and one of the most important rivers on the Indian subcontinent and has given the country India its... Akbars Fort at Attock Attock (Urdu: اٹک) is a city located in the northern border of the Punjab province of Pakistan, and also a border district on the river Indus. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ...


Timur's invasion did not go unopposed and he did meet some resistance during his march to Delhi, most notably by the Sarv Khap coalition in northern India, and the Governor of Meerut. Although impressed and momentarily stalled by the valour of Ilyaas Awan, Timur was able to continue his relentless approach to Delhi, arriving in 1398 to combat the armies of Sultan Mehmud, already weakened by an internal battle for ascension within the royal family. An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... Khap (Hindi:खाप, IAST: khāpa) and Sarv Khap (सर्व खाप) was a system of social administration and organization in the republics of Northwestern states like Haryana, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh in India since ancient times. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... , Meerut (Hindi: मेरठ, Urdu: میرٹھ) IPA:   is a city and a municipal corporation in Meerut district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... Awan is an Arabic word, which means helper or an assistant. ...


The Sultan's army was easily defeated on December 17, 1398. Timur entered Delhi and the city was sacked, destroyed, and left in ruins. Before the battle for Delhi, Timur executed more than 100,000 captives. December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ...


Timur himself recorded the invasions in his memoirs, collectively known as Tuzk-i-Timuri. In them, he vividly described the massacre at Delhi: For other uses, see Delhi (disambiguation). ...

In a short space of time all the people in the [New Delhi] fort were put to the sword, and in the course of one hour the heads of 10,000 infidels were cut off. The sword of Islam was washed in the blood of the infidels, and all the goods and effects, the treasure and the grain which for many a long year had been stored in the fort became the spoil of my soldiers. They set fire to the houses and reduced them to ashes, and they razed the buildings and the fort to the ground....All these infidel Hindus were slain, their women and children, and their property and goods became the spoil of the victors. I proclaimed throughout the camp that every man who had infidel prisoners should put them to death, and whoever neglected to do so should himself be executed and his property given to the informer. When this order became known to the ghazis of Islam, they drew their swords and put their prisoners to death.

One hundred thousand infidels, impious idolators, were on that day slain. Maulana Nasiruddin Umar, a counselor and man of learning, who, in all his life, had never killed a sparrow, now, in execution of my order, slew with his sword fifteen idolatrous Hindus, who were his captives....on the great day of battle these 100,000 prisoners could not be left with the baggage, and that it would be entirely opposed to the rules of war to set these idolaters and enemies of Islam at liberty...no other course remained but that of making them all food for the sword. [20] Ghazi (March 21, 1912 - April 4, 1939) was king of Iraq from 1933 to 1939. ...

According to Malfuzat-i-Timuri, Timur targeted Hindus. In his own words, "Excepting the quarter of the saiyids, the 'ulama and the other Musalmans [sic], the whole city was sacked". In his descriptions of the Loni massacre he wrote, "..Next day I gave orders that the Musalman prisoners should be separated and saved."


During the ransacking of Delhi, almost all inhabitants not killed were captured and enslaved.


Timur left Delhi in approximately January 1399. In April he had returned to his own capital beyond the Oxus (Amu Darya). Immense quantities of spoils were taken from India. According to Ruy Gonzáles de Clavijo, 90 captured elephants were employed merely to carry precious stones looted from his conquest, so as to erect a mosque at Samarkand — what historians today believe is the enormous Bibi-Khanym Mosque. Ironically, the mosque was constructed too quickly and suffered greatly from disrepair within a few decades of its construction. The Amu Darya (in Persian آمودریا; Darya means river in Persian) rises in the Pamirs and flows mainly north-west through the Hindu Kush, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan to join the Aral Sea in a large river delta. ... Ruy Gonzáles de Clavijo (? - April 2, 1412), Spanish traveler and writer. ... For other uses, see Elephant (disambiguation). ... A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... The cupola of the main chamber is raised up to 40 m. ...


Qutb-ud-din Aibak

Historical records compiled by Muslim historian Maulana Hakim Saiyid Abdul Hai attest to the iconoclasm of Qutb-ud-din Aybak. The first mosque built in Delhi, the "Quwwat al-Islam" was built after the demolission of the Hindu temple built previously by Prithvi Raj and certain parts of the temple were left outside the mosque proper [21]. This pattern of iconoclasm was common during his reign, although an argument goes that such iconoclasm was motivated more by politics than by religion[22]. Qutb-ud-din Aybak was a ruler of Medieval India, the first Sultan of Delhi and founder of the Slave dynasty (also known as the Mamluk dynasty). ... A map of the Qutb complex. ...


Iltutmish

Another ruler of the sultanate, Shams-ud-din Iltutmish, conquered and subjugated the Hindu pilgrimage site Varanasi in the 11th century and he continued the destruction of Hindu temples and idols that had begun during the first attack in 1194.[23] Shams-ud-Din Iltutmish, or Altamash, (Persian: شمس الدین التتمش ) was the third Sultan of Delhi and the third ruler of the Slave dynasty (d. ... , Vārāasī ( , Hindi: , IPA: ), also known as Benares, Banaras, or Benaras ( , Hindi: , , IPA: ), or Kashi or Kasi ( , Hindi: , ), is a famous Hindu holy city situated on the banks of the river Ganges (Ganga) in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ...


Firuz Shah Tughlaq

Firuz Shah Tughluq was the third ruler of the Tughlaq dynasty of the Delhi Sultanate. The "Tarikh-i-Firuz Shah" is a historical record written during his reign that attests to the systematic persecution of Hindus under his rule[24]. In particular, it records atrocities committed against Hindu Brahmin priests who refused to convert to Islam: Firuz Shah Tughlaq (also known as Firoz Shah Tughluq) was a Muslim ruler of the Tughlaq Dynasty (1351 - 1388). ...

An order was accordingly given to the Brahman and was brought before Sultan. The true faith was declared to the Brahman and the right course pointed out. but he refused to accept it. A pile was risen on which the Kaffir with his hands and legs tied was thrown into and the wooden tablet on the top. The pile was lit at two places his head and his feet. The fire first reached him in the feet and drew from him a cry and then fire completely enveloped him. Behold Sultan for his strict adherence to law and rectitude[24].

Under his rule, Hindus who were forced to pay the mandatory Jizya tax were recorded as infidels, their communities monitored and, if they violated Imperial ordinances and built temples, they were destroyed. In particular, an incident in the village of Gohana in Haryana was recorded in the "Insha-i-Mahry" (another historical record written by Amud Din Abdullah bin Mahru) where Hindus had erected a deity and were arrested, brought to the palace and executed en-masse[24]. In states ruled by Islamic law, jizya or jizyah (Arabic: جزْية; Ottoman Turkish cizye) is a per capita tax imposed on able bodied non-Muslim men of military age. ... , Haryana (Hindi: हरियाणा, Punjabi: ਹਰਿਆਣਾ, IPA: ) is a state in north India. ...


In 1230, the Hindu King of Orissa Anangabhima III consolidated his rule and proclaimed that an attack on Orissa constituted an attack on the king's god. A sign of Anangabhima's determination to protect Hindu culture is the fact that he named is new capital in Cuttack “Abhinava Varanasi.” His anxieties about further Muslim advances in Orissa proved to be well founded. , Orissa   (Oriya: ଓଡ଼ିଶା), is a state situated on the east coast of India. ...


Vijayanagara

Main article: Vijayanagara

The city flourished between the 14th and 16th centuries, during the height of the Vijayanagar Empire. During this time, it was often in conflict with the kingdoms which rose in the Northern Deccan, and which are often collectively termed the Deccan Sultanates. The period saw brutalities committed by the Muslim Side. In 1565, the empire's armies suffered a massive and catastrophic defeat by an alliance of the Sultanates, and the capital was taken. The victorious armies then razed, depopulated and destroyed the city over a period of several months. The empire continued its slow decline, and its original capital was not re-occupied or rebuilt. Vijayanagara (Kannada: ವಿಜಯನಗರ, English: ) is in Bellary District, northern Karnataka. ... The Deccan Plateau is a vast plateau in India, encompassing most of Central and Southern India. ... The Deccan sultanates were five Muslim-ruled kingdoms–-Bijapur, Golconda, Ahmednagar, Bidar, and Berar of south-central India. ...


In the Mughal empire

The Mughal Empire was marked by periods of tolerance of non-Muslims, such as Hindus, Christians and Sikhs, as well as periods of violent oppression and persecution of those people.[25] The reign of Aurangzeb was particularly brutal. No aspect of Aurangzeb's reign is more cited - or more controversial - than the numerous desecrations and even the destruction of Hindu temples.[25] Aurangzeb banned Diwali, placed a jizya (tax) on non-Muslims and martyred the ninth Sikh guru Tegh Bahadur.[25]The confrontation with the Sikhs saw Aurangzeb and his henchmen committ an endless series of atrocities against Sikhs among them the tortuous execution of several Sikhs including the eight and ten year old sons of Guru Gobind Singh by live-burial. Flag Mughal Empire at its greatest extent in 1700 Capital Agra, Delhi Language(s) Persian (initially also Chagatai; later also Urdu) Government Monarchy List of Mughal emperors  - 1526-1530 Babur  - 1530–1539 and after restoration 1555–1556 Humayun  - 1556–1605 Akbar  - 1605–1627 Jahangir  - 1628–1658 Shah Jahan  - 1659–1707... Aurangzeb (Persian: ), also known as Alamgir I (Persian: ), (November 3, 1618 – March 3, 1707) was the ruler of the Mughal Empire from 1658 until his death. ... Guru Teg Bahadur Ji (April 1, 1621 - November 11, 1675) was the ninth of the Ten Gurus of Sikhism and became Guru on March 20, 1665 following in the footsteps of his grand-nephew, Guru Har Krishan Ji. ... A Sikh man wearing a turban The adherents of Sikhism are called Sikhs. ... A Sikh man wearing a turban The adherents of Sikhism are called Sikhs. ... A traditional portrait of Guru Gobind Singh Ji. ...


During his reign, tens of thousands of temples were desecrated: their facades and interiors were defaced and their murtis (divine images) looted.[25] In many cases, temples were destroyed entirely; in numerous instances mosques were built on their foundations, sometimes using the same stones. Among the temples Aurangzeb destroyed were two that are most sacred to Hindus, in Varanasi and Mathura.[26] In both cases, he had large mosques built on the sites.[25] , VārāasÄ« ( , Hindi: , IPA: ), also known as Benares, Banaras, or Benaras ( , Hindi: , , IPA: ), or Kashi or Kasi ( , Hindi: , ), is a famous Hindu holy city situated on the banks of the river Ganges (Ganga) in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... , Mathura   (Hindi: मथुरा, Urdu: متھرا) is a holy city in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ...


The Kesava Deo temple in Mathura, marked the place that Hindus believe was the birth place of Shri Krishna.[26] In 1661 Aurangzeb ordered the demolition of the temple, and constructed the Katra Masjid mosque. Traces of the ancient Hindu temple can be seen from the back of the mosque. Aurangzeb also destroyed what was the most famous temple in Varanasi- the Vishwanath Temple.[26] The temple had changed its location over the years, but in 1585 Akbar had authorized its location at Gyan Vapi. Aurangzeb ordered its demolition in 1669 and constructed a mosque on the site, whose minarets stand 71 metres above the Ganges. Traces of the old temple can be seen behind the mosque. Centuries later, emotional debate about these wanton acts of cultural desecration continues. Aurangzeb also destroyed the Somnath temple in 1706.[26] Kesava Deo Temple is among the most sacred of Hindu sites. ... , Mathura   (Hindi: मथुरा, Urdu: متھرا) is a holy city in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... , VārāasÄ« ( , Hindi: , IPA: ), also known as Benares, Banaras, or Benaras ( , Hindi: , , IPA: ), or Kashi or Kasi ( , Hindi: , ), is a famous Hindu holy city situated on the banks of the river Ganges (Ganga) in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. ... The most famous temple of the city of Varanasi, the Vishwanath temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Aurangzeb (Persian: ), also known as Alamgir I (Persian: ), (November 3, 1618 – March 3, 1707) was the ruler of the Mughal Empire from 1658 until his death. ... The Somnath Temple located in the Prabhas Kshetra near Veraval in Saurashtra, on the western coast of Gujarat, India is one of the twelve Jyotirlings (golden lingas) symbols of the God Shiva. ...


According to Hindu claims the Mughals supposedly also destroyed the Ram Mandir in Ayodhya, at the birthplace of the Hindu deity Rama. On top of it, they built the Babri Masjid, which has since been a source of tension between the Hindu and Muslim communities. Ayodhya   (Hindi: अयोध्या, Urdu: ایودھیا IAST Ayodhyā) is an ancient city of India, the old capital of Awadh, in the Faizabad district of Uttar Pradesh. ... A view of the Babri Mosque, circa pre-1992. ...


Writer Fernand Braudel wrote in A History of Civilizations (Penguin 1988/1963, p.232-236), Islamic rule in India as a "colonial experiment" was "extremely violent", and "the Muslims could not rule the country except by systematic terror. Cruelty was the norm -- burnings, summary executions, crucifixions or impalements, inventive tortures. Hindu temples were destroyed to make way for mosques. On occasion there were forced conversions. If ever there were an uprising, it was instantly and savagely repressed: houses were burned, the countryside was laid waste, men were slaughtered and women were taken as slaves."


In Kashmir

The Hindu minority in Kashmir has also been historically persecuted by Muslim rulers.[27] While Hindus and Muslims lived in harmony for certain periods of time, several Muslim rulers of Kashmir were intolerant of other religions. Sultãn Sikandar Butshikan of Kashmir (AD 1389-1413) is often considered the worst of these. Historians have recorded many of his atrocities. The Tarikh-i-Firishta records that Sikandar persecuted the Hindus and issued orders proscribing the residency of any other than Muslims in Kashmir. He also ordered the breaking of all "golden and silver images". The Tarikh-i-Firishta further states: "Many of the Brahmins, rather than abandon their religion or their country, poisoned themselves; some emigrated from their native homes, while a few escaped the evil of banishment by becoming Mahomedans. After the emigration of the Bramins, Sikundur ordered all the temples in Kashmeer to be thrown down......Having broken all the images in Kashmeer, (Sikandar) acquired the title of ‘Destroyer of Idols’".[28] Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... Sikandar Butshikan of Kashmir (AD 1389-1413) was a Muslim Sultan of Kashmir. ...


During European rule of the Indian subcontinent

The Goa Inquisition, was established in 1560 by Portuguese missionaries. It was aimed primarily at Hindus and wayward new converts and by the time it was suppressed in 1774, the inquisition had had thousands of Hindus tortured and executed by burning. The British East India Company engaged in a covert and well-financed campaign of evangelical conversions in the 19th century. While officially discouraging conversions, officers of the Company routinely converted Sepoys to Christianity, often by force. This was one of the factors that led to the Indian Rebellion of 1857.[29] St. ... The British East India Company, sometimes referred to as John Company, was the first joint-stock company (the Dutch East India Company was the first to issue public stock). ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants East India Company Sepoys, some princely states, Indian civilians in some areas. ...


Contemporary persecution

While the vast majority of Hindus live in Hindu-majority areas of India, Hindus in other parts of South Asia and in the diaspora have sometimes faced persecution. The Hindu American Foundation's Hindus in South Asia and the Diaspora: A Survey of Human Rights 2005 report surveyed the status of human rights for Hindus in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Fiji, Pakistan, and the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir.[30] The report was based on media coverage, reports from human rights organizations, and firsthand accounts related to human rights violations perpetrated against Hindus because of their religious identity. The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a human rights group whose purpose is to provide a voice for the 2 million strong Hindu American community. ... This article is about the area controlled by India. ...


In the Indian subcontinent

Hindus, like Muslims, Sikhs, and members of other religious groups, experienced severe dislocation and violence during the massive population exchanges associated with the partition of India, as members of various communities moved to what they hoped was the relative safety of an area where they would be a religious majority. Hindus were among the between 200,000 and a million who died during the rioting and other violence associated with the partition.[31]. Population transfer is a term referring to a policy by which a state, or international authority, forces the movement of a large group of people out of a region, most frequently on the basis of their ethnicity or religion. ... This article is under construction. ...


India

In 1954, the Federal Government of India passed the Hindu Marriage Act which prohibited Hindu males in India from marrying more than one wife. Although polygamy is frowned upon by modern standards, this act specifically targeted Hindus, without mentioning any other religious groups, including Muslims, which demographically make up the 2nd largest religious community in India and the 2nd largest Muslim population in the world. Scholars believe that the purpose of this omition in the act was to entice Muslims to stay in India by giving their men the option to take more than one wife which is established as acceptable under Islamic Law. Sharia (Arabic شريعة also Sharia, Shariah or Syariah) is traditional Islamic law. ...


Jammu and Kashmir

Pakistan has been covertly financing Islamic Terrorism in Kashmir. Islamic terrorists have routinely engaged in attacks on Hindu pilgrims in both Kashmir and neighboring Jammu. Kashmiri militants have consistently persecuted Hindus in the region, as well as moderate Muslims suspected of siding with India. Kashmiri Pandit Hindus, who have been residents of Kashmir for centuries, have been ethnically cleansed from Kashmir by Islamic militants.[32][33]. In particular, the Wandhama Massacre in 1998 was an incident in which 24 Kashmiri Hindus were gunned down by Islamists disguised as Indian soldiers. Many Kashmiri Hindus have been killed and thousands of children orphaned over the course of the conflict in Kashmir. Kashmir : Shown in green is the Kashmiri region under Pakistani control. ... Jammu   (Hindi: जम्मू, Urdu: جموں) is one of the three regions comprising the disputed state of Jammu and Kashmir. ... Original Kashmiri Pandit (Hindi: ) refers to a person who belongs to a sect of Hindu Pandits who originate from the Kashmir region. ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... The Hindu temple in Wandhama after it was desecrated and destroyed by the terorists . ... Islamism is a political ideology derived from the conservative religious views of Muslim fundamentalism. ...


Northeast India

In recent years, large parts of Northeastern India have become Christianized owing to the fervent activities of missionaries. In these states, especially Nagaland Hindus are not able to celebrate Durga Puja and other essential festivals due to harassment and killing by Christian Terrorist groups. In Tripura,[2] the NLFT has targeted Swamis and temples for attacks. The Baptist Church of Tripura is alleged to have supplied NLFT with arms and financial support and encouraged the murder of Hindus, particularly infants.[34] A conventional tactic of the terrorists is to torch houses belonging to Hindus while the residents are still inside. They have been known to raid Hindu sanctuaries and shoot all the members. This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Durga Puja (Bengali: দুর্গাপূজা Durga Puja) is the biggest festival of Bengali Hindus. ... The National Liberation Front of Tripura (NLFT) was formed in December 1989 for the purpose of seceding from India in order to create an independent Christian fundamentalist state of Tripura. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is...


In the state of Meghalaya, there have been innumerable occasions when Hindus have been particularly targeted.Some of the worst known acts of violence were 1. 1979 mass slaughter of Hindu Bengalis by Christian Khasi/Tribals on the pretext that every Bengali in Shillong was a Bangladeshi. 2. 1987 assault on Nepali Hindus and Bengali Hindus. 3. 1988, 1989,1990 and 1991 - Minor riots against Bengali Hindus 4. 1992 - Worst ever riot against Bengali Hindus by Khasis, when a pregnant Bengali woman was raped and subsequently murdered because her husband had participated in a parade protesting against the imposition of a ban on Durga Puja


Since then most of the Hindu Bengalis have left Meghalaya. Non Tribals are not allowed to purchase land or anything else and hence no more Hindus ever settle there . Surprisingly the state religion is Christianity and till now the Church has never bothered to request the locals to end their hate for Hindus and Bengalis. [35]

See also: Hinduism in India

India is the birthplace of Hinduism. ...

West Bengal
Main article: Morichjhanpi

The Left Front communist party government of the state of West Bengal executed a brutal massacre of low-caste Hindus in Morichjhanpi in 1978. The Morichjhanpi massacre was perpetrated by the communist government against poor Bengali Hindu refugees who were ethnically cleansed from Muslim-majority East Pakistan/Bangladesh during the Partition of India. They were migrating from other states in India where they had settled as refugees after the Partition of India. The attempt was seen by the communists as an "aggressive encroachment" so they manufactured allegations of "violating the forest act" and used it as a pretext to harass the refugees.The Morichjhanpi incident refers to the actions throughout 1979 when thousands of settler families were brutally evicted from the island. The incident resulted, directly or indirectly, in hundreds of deaths, including 36 refugees killed in police firings on January 31, 1979. In spite of a pathetic fight back by some of the islanders, several thousand settlers were eventually removed over the course of the year. Morichjhanpi (alternatively Morichjhapi) is an island set in the mangrove forests of the Sundarbans in West Bengal, India. ... Left Front election propaganda in Kolkata 2004 DSP-meeting in Kolkata West Bengal Left Front Committee meeting for solidarity with Tripura Left Front is an alliance of Indian leftist parties. ... , West Bengal (Bengali: পশ্চিমবঙ্গ Poshchimbôŋgo) is a state in eastern India. ... Morichjhanpi (alternatively Morichjhapi) is an island set in the mangrove forests of the Sundarbans in West Bengal, India. ... Morichjhanpi (alternatively Morichjhapi) is an island set in the mangrove forests of the Sundarbans in West Bengal, India. ... The Bengali people are the ethnic community from Bengal (divided between India and Bangladesh) on the Indian subcontinent with a history dating back four millennia. ... East Pakistan was a former province of Pakistan which existed between 1955 and 1971. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ...


Bangladesh

The HAF report documents the long history of anti-Hindu atrocities in Bangladesh, a topic that many Indians and Indian governments over the years have preferred not to acknowledge. Such atrocities, including targeted attacks against temples, open theft of Hindu property, and rape of young Hindu women and enticements to convert to Islam, have increased sharply in recent years after the Jamat-e-Islami joined the coalition government led by the Bangladesh National Party. Anti-Hindu leaflet launched by fundamentalist Christian churches Anti-Hindu prejudice is a negative perception against Hinduism, Hindus and Indian or Hindu culture. ... The English language word proselytism is derived ultimately from the Greek language prefix pros (towards) and the verb erchomai (to come). ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Jamaat-e-Islami (Urdu: جماعتِ اlلامی, Islamic Assembly Jamaat, JI) is an Islamic political movement founded in Lahore by Maulana Maududi 26 August 1941. ... Bangladesh Nationalist Party (বাংলাদেশ জাতীয়তাবাদী দল Bāŋlādeś Jātīyatābādī Dal, BNP) is the most popular Bangladesh. ...


Bangladesh has had a troublesome history of persecution of Hindus as well. A US-based human rights organisation, Refugees International, has claimed that religious minorities, especially Hindus, still face discrimination in Bangladesh.[36] The government of Bangladesh, a nationalist party openly calls for ‘Talibanisation’ of the state.[37][38] [39]However, the prospect of actually "Talibanizing" the state is regarded as a remote possibility, since Bangladeshi Islamic society is generally more progressive than the extremist Taliban of Afghanistan. Political scholars conclude that while the Islamization of Bangladesh is real, the country is not on the brink of being Talibanized[37].In 1971 at the time of the liberation of Bangladesh from East Pakistan, the Hindu population accounted for 15% of the total population. Thirty years on, it is now estimated at just 10.5% [40] The ‘Vested Property Act’ previously named the ‘Enemy Property Act’ has seen up to 40% of Hindu land snatched away forcibly. Since this government has come into power, of all the rape crimes registered in Bangladesh, 98% have been registered by Hindu women. Hindu temples in Bangladesh have also been vandalised [41][42]. The United States Congressional Caucus on India has condemned these atrocities.[43] The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1995 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the United States, United Kingdom and the Northern Alliance. ...


Bangladeshi feminist Taslima Nasrin's 1993 novel Lajja deals with the anti-Hindu riots and anti-secular sentiment in Bangladesh in the wake of the destruction of the Babri Masjid in India. The book was banned in Bangladesh, and helped draw international attention to the situation of the Bangladeshi Hindu minority. Taslima Nasrin Taslima Nasrin (Bangla: তসলিমা নাসরিন), also known as Taslima Nasreen, (born 25 August 1962 in Mymensingh, Bangladesh) is a Bengali Bangladeshi physician, author, feminist human rights activist and secular humanist. ... Lajja (Bengali: লজ্জা Lôjja) is a novel in Bengali by Taslima Nasrin, a writer of Bangladesh. ... A view of the Babri Mosque, circa pre-1992. ...


On October 2006, the United States Commission on International Religion Freedom published a report titled 'Policy Focus on Bangladesh', said that since its last election, 'Bangladesh has experienced growing violence by religious extremists, intensifying concerns expressed by the countries religious minorities'. The report further stated that Hindus are particularly vulnerable in a period of rising violence and extremism, whether motivated by religious, political or criminal factors, or some combination. The report noted that Hindus had multiple disadvantages against them in Bangladesh, such as perceptions of dual loyalty with respect to India and religious beliefs that are not tolerated by the politically dominant Islamic Fundamentalists of the Bangladesh Nationalist Party. Violence against Hindus has taken place "in order to encourage them to flee in order to seize their property".The previous reports of the Hindu American Foundation were acknowledged and confirmed by this non-partisan report[44]. Dual loyalty is a term used in political discussions to describe, a situation where a person has loyalty to two separate interests which potentially conflict with each other. ... The phrase Islamic fundamentalism is primarily used in the West to describe Islamist groups. ... Bangladesh Nationalist Party (Bengali: বাংলাদেশ জাতীয়তাবাদী দল Bangladesh Jatiotabadi Dôl, BNP) is the immediate past ruling political party of Bangladesh, as part of an alliance with Jamaat-e-Islami Bangladesh (as of October 2006). ... The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a human rights group whose purpose is to provide a voice for the 2 million strong Hindu American community. ...


On November 2, 2006, USCIRF criticized Bangladesh for continuing persecution of minority Hindus. It also urged the Bush administration to get Dhaka to ensure protection of religious freedom and minority rights before Bangladesh's next national elections in January 2007[44]. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Dhaka (previously Dacca; Bengali: Ḍhākā; IPA: ) is the capital of Bangladesh and the principal city of Dhaka District. ...

See also: Hinduism in Bangladesh

Hinduism is the second largest religious affiliation in Bangladesh, covering about 11% of the population as of 2006 census [1]. In terms of population, Bangladesh is the third largest Hindu state of the world after India and Nepal. ...

Pakistan

There have been severe and often institutionalized persecution of Hindus by Muslims in Pakistan since its formation in 1947. The increasing Islamization has caused many Hindus to leave Hinduism and seek emancipation by converting to other faiths such as Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam. Such Islamization include the blasphemy laws, which make it dangerous for religious minorities to express themselves freely and engage freely in religious and cultural activities [45].Minority members of the Pakistan National Assembly have alleged that Hindus were being hounded and humiliated to force them to leave Pakistan.[46]. In addition to the ethnic cleansing of Hindus following the Partition of India in 1947, the Hindus in Pakistan are subjected to anti-blasphemy laws, hate propaganda, attacks, and forced conversions. Hindus in what is now Pakistan have declined from 23% of the total population in 1947 to less than 2% today. The HAF report condemns Pakistan for systematic state-sponsored religious discrimination against Hindus through "anti-blasphemy" laws. It documents numerous reports of Hindus being held as "bonded laborers" in slavery-like conditions in rural Pakistan, something repeatedly ignored by the Pakistani government. Pakistan aggressively portrays its struggle against India as a Hindu-Muslim conflict, making it clear that its own Hindu minority is fair game for persecution. This article is under construction. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... This article is under construction. ... This article is about discrimination in the social science context. ... Look up blasphemy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Slave redirects here. ...


In a recent interview with the US-based CNN news agency, the martial dictator Musharraf proclaimed, "Does one call terrorists in Sri Lanka Hindu terrorists? Why is Pakistan's bomb called an Islamist bomb? Why is India's bomb not called a Hindu bomb and that of Israel as a Jewish bomb?"[47] The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ...


1971 Bangladesh atrocities

During the 1971 Bangladesh atrocities there were widespread killings and ethnic cleansing of civilians in Bangladesh (then East Pakistan under Pakistani occupation), and widespread violations of human rights carried out by the Pakistan Army, which was supported by political and religious militias during the Bangladesh Liberation War. In Bangladesh, the atrocities are identified as a genocide, which is disputed by Pakistan. Many of the victims were Hindus, and the total death toll was in the millions[48] [49].TIME magazine reported that "The Hindus, who account for three-fourths of the refugees and a majority of the dead, have borne the brunt of the Muslim military hatred."[50] This is false story,never been established by any scientific survey. ... Combatants Bengali units of Pakistan Army and civilian volunteers Pakistan Armed Forces Commanders Prime Minister Tajuddin Ahmed (April 17 -December 16) Col(ret). ... This is false story,never been established by any scientific survey. ... Ethnic cleansing refers to various policies or practices aimed at the displacement of an ethnic group from a particular territory in order to create a supposedly ethnically pure society. ... East Pakistan was a former province of Pakistan which existed between 1955 and 1971. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Masih incident

On June 29, 2005, police in Nowshera, NWFP, arrested Christian janitor Yousaf Masih on blasphemy charges. Witnesses claimed Masih had burned pages of the Qur'an while disposing of trash for his employer. Following his arrest, a mob of between 300 and 500 protesters destroyed a Hindu temple and houses belonging to Christian and Hindu families in the city. While police arrested some perpetrators after the fact, under the terms of a deal negotiated between Islamic religious leaders and the Hindu/Christian communities, police released all of them without charge. Police released Masih from custody on bail on August 6, 2005[51]. is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Forced Conversions

Forced and coerced conversions of religious minorities to Islam occurred at the hands of societal actors. Religious minorities claimed that government actions to stem the problem were inadequate. Several human rights groups have highlighted the increased phenomenon of Hindu girls, particularly in Karachi, being kidnapped from their families and forced to convert to Islam.[citation needed]


Hindu women have also been known to be victims of kidnapping and forced conversion to Islam.[52] Krishan Bheel, a Hindu member of the National Assembly of Pakistan, came into news recently for manhandling Qari Gul Rehman.[53]. Krishan Bheel (1968 - ) is a Pakistani politician. ... The National Assembly is the lower house of the bicameral Parliament of Pakistan. ...


On October 18, 2005, Sanno Amra and Champa, a Hindu couple residing in the Punjab Colony, Karachi, Sindh returned home to find that their three teenage daughters had disappeared. After inquiries to the local police, the couple discovered that their daughters had been taken to a local madrassah, had been converted to Islam, and were denied unsupervised contact with their parents[51].


Temple Destruction

Several Hindu temples have been destroyed in Pakistan. A notable incident was the destruction of the Ramna Kali Mandir in former East Pakistan. The temple was bulldozed by the Pakistan Army on March 27, 1971.The Dhakeshwari Temple was severely damaged during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, and over half of the temple's buildings were destroyed. The main worship hall was taken over by the Pakistan Army and used as an ammunitions storage area. Several of the temple custodians were tortured and killed by the Army though most, including the Head Priest, fled to their ancestral villages and to India and therefore escaped death. The Ramna Kali Mandir (Bangla: রমনা কালী মন্দির), also known as the Ramna Kalibari (house of the Hindu Goddess Kali) was one of the most famous Hindu temples of the Indian subcontinent. ... East Pakistan was a former province of Pakistan which existed between 1955 and 1971. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Dhakeshwari temple. ... Combatants India Mukti Bahini Pakistan Commanders Sam Manekshaw J.S. Aurora A. A. K. Niazi # Strength 500,000+ troops 400,000+ troops Casualties 3,843 killed[1] 9,851 wounded[1] c. ...


In 2006, the last Hindu temple in Lahore was destroyed to pave the way for construction of a multi-storied commercial building. The temple was demolished after officials of the Evacuee Property Trust Board concealed facts from the board chairman about the nature of the building. When reporters from Pakistan-based newspaper Dawn tried to cover the incident, they were accosted by the henchmen of the property developer, who denied that a Hindu temple existed at the site[54].   (Urdu: لاہور, Punjabi: لہور, pronounced ) is the capital of the province of Punjab, and is the second largest city in Pakistan. ... Dawn is Pakistans oldest and most widely-read English-language newspaper. ...


Several political parties in Pakistan have objected to this move, such as the Pakistan People's party and the Pakistani Muslim League-N[55][56]. The move has also evoked strong condemnation from in India from minority bodies and political parties, including the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), the Congress Party, as well as Muslim advocacy political parties such as the All India Muslim Majlis-e-Mushawarat[57]. A firm of lawyers representing the Hindu minority has approached the Lahore High Court seeking a directive to the builders to stop the construction of the commercial plaza and reconstruct the temple at the site. The petitioners maintain that the demolition violates section 295 of the Pakistan Penal Code prohibiting the demolition of places of worship [58]. The Bharatiya Janata Party [BJP] (Hindi: , English: ), created in 1980, is a major Indian political party. ... The Indian National Congress (also known as the Congress Party) is the largest subscription-based organisation in the world. ...

See also: Hinduism in Pakistan

After the Partition of India, Hinduism became one of the smallest religions in the newly created state of Pakistan, but has nonetheless played a major role in its culture and politics as well as the history of its regions. ...

Bhutan

The Hindus of Nepalese origin have been living in Bhutan since nineteenth century.[59]. On a 1980 census, the Bhutanese Druk autocracy found a significant population of ethnic Nepalese (mostly Hindus) which they interpreted as a danger to the Druk domination. [60] The monarch imprisoned a Brahmin democratic movement leader Tek Nath Rizal and forced the Hindus "to observe dress codes and etiquette characteristic of Northern Bhutanese, under threat of punishment"[60]. The Hindus were then tortured and expelled from the nation. Approximately 103,000 of such refugees including Hindus, Kirats etc are living in Nepal, [61] which was the only Hindu nation left when they were exiled. This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This page deals with the Hindu varnas. ...


In other countries

The Hindu presence in countries outside South Asia is small but growing. Historically, there have been large Hindu populations in Indonesia, Cambodia, Fiji, and the Philippines. There have been Hindus in Guyana, Suriname,and Malaysia since the 19th century. The twentieth century saw the growth of Hindu communities in Saudi Arabia, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States.


The persecution of Hindus have risen in several of these countries, especially in Muslim dominated countries such as Malaysia and Afghanistan. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


Afghanistan

The Taliban regime in Afghanistan had committed atrocities on the Hindu minority in the country. 500 Hindu families disappeared in Afghanistan shortly after the Taliban came to power. The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1995 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the United States, United Kingdom and the Northern Alliance. ...


During the Taliban regime, Sumptuary laws were passed in 2001 which forced Hindus to wear yellow badges in public to identify themselves as such.This has been compared to Adolf Hitler's treatment of Jews in Nazi Germany during World War II[62][63]. Hindu women were forced to dress according to Islamic hijab, ostensibly a measure to "protect" them from harassment. This was part of the Taliban's plan to segregate "un-Islamic" and "idolatrous" communities from Islamic ones[64]. In addition, Hindus were forced to mark their places of residence identifying them as Hindu homes. The Taliban (Pashto: , also anglicized as Taleban) are a Sunni Muslim Pashtun movement that ruled most of Afghanistan from 1995 until 2001, when their leaders were removed from power by a cooperative military effort between the United States, United Kingdom and the Northern Alliance. ... Sumptuary laws (from Latin sumptuariae leges) were laws that regulated and reinforced social hierarchies and morals through restrictions on clothing, food, and luxury expenditures. ... Compulsory Jewish badge under the Nazi occupation of Europe: the Star of David with the word Jew inside (this one in German) A yellow badge, also referred to as a Jewish badge, was a mandatory mark or a piece of cloth of specific geometric shape, worn on the outer garment... Hitler redirects here. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... “Higab” redirects here. ...


The decree was condemned by the Indian and United States governments as a violation of religious freedom[65]. Widespread protests against the Taliban regime broke out in Bhopal,India. In the United States, chairman of the Anti-Defamation League Abraham Foxman compared the decree to the practices of Nazi Germany, where Jews were required to wear labels identifying them as such[66]. The comparison was also drawn by California Democrat and holocaust survivor Tom Lantos, and New York Democrat and author of the bipartisan 'Sense of the Congress' non-binding resolution against the anti-Hindu decree Eliot L Engel[67].In the United States, congressmen and several lawmakers[68] wore yellow badges on the floor of the Senate during the debate as a demonstration of their solidarity with the Hindu minority in Afghanistan[69]. For other uses, see Bhopal (disambiguation). ... The Anti-Defamation League (or ADL) is an advocacy group founded by Bnai Brith in the United States whose stated aim is to stop, by appeals to reason and conscience and, if necessary, by appeals to law, the defamation of the Jewish people. ... Abraham Henry Foxman (born 1940) is the current National Director and chairman of the Anti-Defamation League of Bnai Brith. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ...


Indian analyst Rahul Banerjee said that this was not the first that Hindus has been singled out for state-sponsored oppression in Afghanistan. Violence against Hindus has caused a rapid depletion in the Hindu population over the years[69]. Since the 1990s many Afghan Hindus have fled the country, seeking asylum in countries such as Germany[70].

See also: Hinduism in Afghanistan

Inside an Afghan Hindu Temple Hinduism in Afghanistan has existed for almost as long as Hinduism itself. ...

Fiji

Hindus in Fiji constitute approximately 38% of the population. During the late 1990s there were several riots against Hindus by radical elements in Fiji. In the Spring of 2000, the democratically elected Fijian government led by Prime Minister Mahendra Chaudhry was held hostage by a guerilla group, headed by George Speight. They were demanding a segregated state exclusively for the native Fijians, thereby legally abolishing any rights the Hindu inhabitants have now. The Hindu minority is denied any land owning rights and is routinely attacked and harassed. Several dozen Hindu temples have been vandalized or destroyed by arson or looting. This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ...


The methodist church of Fiji repeatedly calls for the creation of a Christian State and has endorsed the forceful conversion of Hindus since a coup d'etat in 1987[71].

See also: Hinduism in Fiji and Church involvement in Fiji coups

Hinduism in Fiji has a following primarily among the Indo-Fijians. ... Fiji has had four coups in the past two decades. ...

Indonesia

Hindu-Muslim relations in Indonesia have been benign for the most part due to the ingrained cultural influence of Hinduism on the population. Hinduism was the indigenous religion in Indonesia before the arrival of Islam in the 14th century, until the conversion of the local Acheh ruler to Islam. With the ruler's conversion, the majority of the people gradually converted to Islam. Islam spread east from Acheh to Java and the people gradually converted to Islam. Traces of Hindu influence remain in the Indonesian language, literature and the arts. Early Hindu architecture can be seen in temples built by the Srivijaya, Kediri and Majapahit kingdoms. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


At present, Hindus are being subjected to renewed pressure to leave their faith by Christian missionary groups and Christian evangelism in the temple town of Terupati has angered Hindus.Also, Hindus in Bali are persecuted by certain segments of the Muslim population. This article is about the Indonesian island. ...


Kazakhstan

In 2005 and 2006 Kazakh officials persistently and repeatedly tried to close down the Hare Krishna farming community near Almaty.


On November 20, 2006, three buses full of riot police, two ambulances, two empty lorries, and executors of the Karasai district arrived at the community in sub-zero weather and evicted the Hare Krishna followers from thirteen homes, which the police proceeded to demolish.


The Forum 18 News Service reported, "Riot police who took part in the destruction threw personal belongings of the Hare Krishna devotees into the snow, and many devotees were left without clothes. Power for lighting and heating systems had been cut off before the demolition began. Furniture and larger household belongings were loaded onto trucks. Officials said these possessions would be destroyed. Two men who tried to prevent the bailiffs from entering a house to destroy it were seized by 15 police officers who twisted their hands and took them away to the police car."[72] Forum 18 is a Norwegian human rights organisation that seeks to establish religious freedom for all on the basis of Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. ...


The Hare Krishna community had been promised that no action would be taken before the report of a state commission – supposedly set up to resolve the dispute – was made public. On the day the demolition began, the commission's chairman, Amanbek Mukhashev, told Forum 18, "I know nothing about the demolition of the Hare Krishna homes – I'm on holiday." He added, "As soon as I return to work at the beginning of December we will officially announce the results of the Commission's investigation." Other officials also refused to comment.


The United States urged Kazakhstan's authorities to end what it called an "aggressive" campaign against the country's tiny Hare Krishna community.[73]


Malaysia

Approximately nine percent of the population of Malaysia are Tamil Indians, of whom nearly 90 percent are practicing Hindus.Indian settlers came to Malaysia from Tamil Nadu in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Between April to May 2006, several Hindu temples were demolished by city hall authorities in the country, accompanied by violence against Hindus[74]. On April 21, 2006, the Malaimel Sri Selva Kaliamman Temple in Kuala Lumpur was reduced to rubble after the city hall sent in bulldozers [75]. Languages Tamil Religions Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Jainism Related ethnic groups Dravidian people Brahui people Kannadigas Malayalis Tamils Telugus Tuluvas Gonds The Tamil people are a multi-ethnic group from the Indian subcontinent with a recorded history going back more than two millennia. ... This article is about the Hindu religion; for other meanings of the word, see Hindu (disambiguation). ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The president of the Consumers Association of Subang and Shah Alam in Selangor State has been helping to organise efforts to stop the local authorities in the Muslim dominated city of Shah Alam from demolishing a 107-year-old Hindu temple. The growing Islamization in Malaysia is a cause for concern to many Malaysians who follow minority religions such as Hinduism[76].


Many Hindu advocacy groups have protested what they allege is a systematic plan of temple cleansing in Malaysia. The official reason given by the Malaysian government has been that the temples were built "illegally". However, several of the temples are centuries old[77].


On May 11, 2006, armed city hall officers from Kuala Lumpur forcefully demolished part of a 60-year-old suburban temple that serves more than 1,000 Hindus. The "Hindu Rights Action Force", a coalition of several NGO's, have protested these demolitions by lodging complaints with the Malaysian Prime Minister[77]. is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Maju dan makmur (Malay: Progress and Prosper) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: , Country State Establishment 1857 Granted city status 1974 Government  - Mayor (Datuk Bandar) Datuk Abdul Hakim Borhan From 14 December 2006 Area  - City 243. ...


Another form of persecution is the requirement by the Malaysian government for the annual Thaipusam procession to obtain a police permit under the Internal Security Act, which by the anti-discriminatory standards of most nations, is flawed as it requires permits only for Hindu religious festivals. [citation needed] It has been suggested that Thai Poosam Kavady be merged into this article or section. ... In the wake of World War II, a number of countries around the world introduced legislation that severely curtailed the rights of known or suspected communists. ...

See also: Hinduism in Malaysia

Around nine percent of the population of Malaysia are Tamil Indians, of whom nearly 90 percent are practising Hindus. ...

Russia

Hindus in Russia have been subject to discrimination. For example, significant obstacles have been placed to the construcition of a Hindu temple in Moscow. It was reported that some influential official of Russian Orthodox Church propagated misinformation and defamation, e.g., describing Krishna as an "evil demon". [78] For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate (Russian: ), also known as the Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, is a body of Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ...

See also: Hinduism in Russia

Hinduism has been spread in Russia primarily due to the work of missionaries from the religious organization International Society for Krishna Consciousness from the West and by itinerant swamis from India. ...

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia is an Islamic theocracy, and officially does not tolerate any other religion. Hindus are considered polytheists by Islamic law, which is used as a justification for greater discrimination in calculating accidental death or injury compensation. According to the country's "Hanbali" interpretation of Shari'a, Hindus receive 1/16 of the amount a male Muslim receives[79]. Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      For the metal band, refer to Theocracy (band). ...


On April 1 2005, Saudi authorities demolished a clandestine makeshift Hindu temple in an old district of Riyadh and deported three worshipers found there, in act that is considered as persecuting Hindus by Paul Marshall.[80]


Trinidad

Indians, predominantly Hindus, came as indentured laborers in 1838 to British Guyana and later to Trinidad, Jamaica, Grenada, St. Lucia, Martinique, Guadeloupe and Surinam. During the initial decades of Indian indenture, Indian cultural forms met with either contempt or indifference by the Christian majority[81]. Hindus have made many contributions to Trinidad history and culture even though the state historically regarded Hindus as second-class citizens.Hindus in Trinidad struggled over the granting of adult franchise, the Hindu marriage bill, the divorce bill, cremation ordinance, and others[81].After Trinidad's independence from colonial rule, Hindus were marginalized by the African-based People's National Movement. The opposing party, the People's Democratic party, was portrayed as a "Hindu group", and other anti-Hindu tactics were used against them. Hindus were castigated as a "recalcitrant and hostile minority"[81].Hindus were alienated by such Christian communal groups. The support of the PNM government to creole art forms in Carnivals, while their public rejection and ridicule of Hindu art forms, was a particular source of contention for the Hindu minority.The displacement of PNM from power in 1985 would improve the situation. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... from http://www. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Anti-Hindu leaflet launched by fundamentalist Christian churches Anti-Hindu prejudice is a negative perception against Hinduism, Hindus and Indian or Hindu culture. ...


There has been persistent discontent among the Hindus with their marginalization. Many Christianized groups portray Hindus as "clannish, backward and miserly".During the General Elections of 1986, the absence of the Bhagavad Gita and the Quran at polling stations for required oath-taking was interpreted as a gross insult to Hindus and Muslims. The absence of any Hindu religious texts at the official residence of the President of Trinidad and Tobago during the swearing in of the new Government in 1986 was perceived as another insult to the minority communities since they were represented in the government.The exclusivist Christian symbolism operative in the country's top national award, the Trinity Cross, has persistently stung Hindu religious sensibility. This was to climax in 1995 with the refusal of the Hindu Dharmaacharya to accept the award, while issuing a statement that his action should be seen as an opportunity for those in authority to create a national award that recognizes the plurality of religious beliefs in this country. The national education system and curriculum have been repeatedly accused of such majority-oriented symbolism. The use of discernibly Christian-oriented prayers at Government schools, the non-representation of Hinduism in approved school textbooks, and the lack of emphasis on Hindu religious observace evoked deep resentment from the Hindu community. Intensified protests over the course of the 1980s led to an improvement in the state's attitudes towards Hindus[81].The divergence of some of the fundamental aspects of local Hindu culture, the segregation of the Hindu community from Trinidad, and the disinclination to risk erasing the more fundamental aspects of what had been constructed as "Trinidad Hinduism" in which the identity of the group had been rooted, would often generate dissension when certain dimensions of Hindu culture came into contact with the State. While the incongruences continue to generate debate, and often conflict, it is now tempered with growing awareness and consideration on the part of the state to the Hindu minority[81]. Hindus have been subjected to persistent proselytization also by Christian missionaries[82]. Specifically the evangelical and Pentecostal Christians. Such activities reflect racial tensions that at times arise between the Christianized Afro-Trinidadian and Hindu Indo-Trinidadian communities[82]. Bhagavad Gīta भगवद्गीता, composed ca the fifth - second centuries BC, is part of the epic poem Mahabharata, located in the Bhisma-Parva chapters 23–40. ...


United States

The rise of the Indian American community in the United States has brought about some isolated incidences of attacks on them, as has been the case with many minority groups in the United States. Attacks specific to Hindus in the United States stem from what is often referred to as the "racialization of religion" among Americans, a process that begins when certain phenotypical features associated with a group and attached to race in popular discourse become associated with a particular religion or religions[83]. For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ...


In the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States, Indian American Hindus in the United States, together with adherents of other religions from the same community of the Indian Americans (mainly Muslims and Sikhs), have faced isolated instances of attacks on them, often for "looking Middle-Eastern" or being mistaken for Muslims. Notable instances include the attack on a Hindu temple dedicated to Krishna in Matawan, New Jersey which involved firebombing with a Molotov cocktail and instances of some Hindus being verbally assasulted and/or harassed[84][85]. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... For an article on American Indians see Native Americans. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... A Sikh man wearing a turban The adherents of Sikhism are called Sikhs. ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ... Matawan is a borough located in Monmouth County, New Jersey. ... “NJ” redirects here. ... Molotov cocktail is the generic name for a variety of crude incendiary weapons. ...


Belarus

The tiny Hindu community of Belarus have seen some of the worst persecutions in former Soviet Union. Most of the Hindus are either imprisoned in the notorious jails or are living as refugees in USA and other countries. See Also: Light of Kailasa - The first Hindu movement in Belarus The Light of Kailasa is a Hindu movement originally from Belarus. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Elst, Koenraad. "Was there an Islamic "Genocide" of Hindus?", Kashmir Herald, 2006-08-25. Retrieved on 2006-08-25. 
  2. ^ Caste in Muslim Society by Yoginder Sikand
  3. ^ Aggarwal, Patrap (1978). Caste and Social Stratification Among Muslims in India. Manohar. 
  4. ^ Mirza Kalichbeg Fredunbeg: The Chachnamah, An Ancient History of Sind, Giving the Hindu period down to the Arab Conquest. [1]
  5. ^ Wink, Andre, "Al-Hind, the Making of the Indo-Islamic World", Brill Academic Publishers, Aug 1, 2002, ISBN 0-391-04173-8 pg. 204
  6. ^ Trifkovic, Serge (Sept. 11, 2002). The Sword of the Prophet: History, Theology, Impact on the World. Regina Orthodox Press. 
  7. ^ Trifkovic, Serge. "Islam’s Other Victims: India", FrontPageMagazine.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  8. ^ Sindhi Culture by U.T. Thakkur, Univ. of Bombay Publications, 1959
  9. ^ J E Lohuizen-de Leeuw, South Asian Archaeology 1975, pg 152-153, Jan 1, 1979, Brill Academic Publishers, ISBN 90-04-05996-2
  10. ^ Saunders, Kenneth. A Pageant of India. H. Milford, Oxford University Press pg. 162. 
  11. ^ Karan, Pradyumna. The Non-Western World:Environment, Development and Human Rights. Routledge pg. 344. 
  12. ^ Barron, Milton (1967). Minorities in a Changing World. Knopf p54. 
  13. ^ a b P. M. ( Peter Malcolm) Holt, Bernard Lewis, The Cambridge History of Islam, Cambridge University Press, Apr 21, 1977, ISBN 0-521-29137-2 pg 3-4.
  14. ^ Kakar, Sudhir. The Colors of Violence: Cultural Identities, Religion, and Conflict. University of Chicago Press P 50. 
  15. ^ Rashid, A. (1969). Society and Culture in Medieval India, 1206-1556 A.D. (Excerpt from Taj-ul-Maasir). Firma K. L. Mukhopadhyay. 
  16. ^ B.F. Manz, "Tīmūr Lang", in Encyclopaedia of Islam, Online Edition, 2006
  17. ^ The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, "Timur", 6th ed., Columbia University Press: "... Timur (timoor') or Tamerlane (tăm'urlān), c.1336–1405, Mongol conqueror, b. Kesh, near Samarkand. ...", (LINK)
  18. ^ "Timur", in Encyclopaedia Britannica: "... [Timur] was a member of the Turkic Barlas clan of Mongols..."
  19. ^ "Baber", in Encyclopaedia Britannica: "... Baber first tried to recover Samarkand, the former capital of the empire founded by his Mongol ancestor Timur Lenk ..."
  20. ^ Taimur Lane. Turk-i-Taimuri. 
  21. ^ Maulana Hakim Saiyid Abdul Hai "Hindustan Islami Ahad Mein" (Hindustan under Islamic rule), Eng Trans by Maulana Abdul Hasan Nadwi
  22. ^ Index_1200-1299,Columbia.edu
  23. ^ Elliot, Henry Miers (1953). The History of India: as told by its own historians; the Muhammadan period (Excerpt from Jamiu'l-Hikayat). University of Michigan. 
  24. ^ a b c Banerjee, Jamini (1967). History of Firuz Shah Tughluq. Munshiram Manoharlal. 
  25. ^ a b c d e The South Asian Aurangzeb profile
  26. ^ a b c d Rajiv Varma Destruction of Hindu Temples by Aurangzeb
  27. ^ Firishta, Muhammad Qãsim Hindû Shãh; John Briggs (translator) (1829- 1981 Reprint). Tãrîkh-i-Firishta (History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India). 
  28. ^ Firishta, Muhammad Qãsim Hindû Shãh; John Briggs (translator) (1829- 1981 Reprint). Tãrîkh-i-Firishta (History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India). 
  29. ^ Stokes, Eric (1973). The First Century of British Colonial Rule in India: Social Revolution or Social Stagnation?” Past and Present. 
  30. ^ "Hindus in South Asia and the Diaspora: A Survey of Human Rights 2005- Executive Summary", Hindu American Foundation. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  31. ^ Death toll in the partition
  32. ^ "Atrocities on Kashmiri Hindus by Pakistan-Trained Terrorists". Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  33. ^ Gill, Kanwar Pal Singh. The Kashmiri Pandits: An Ethnic Cleansing the World Forgot. South Asian Terrorism Portal. Retrieved on 2006-08-26.
  34. ^ Bhaumik, Subhir. "'Church backing Tripura rebels'", BBC News. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  35. ^ Stephen, Knapp. "Thirteen years of killings". Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  36. ^ "Discrimination against Bangladeshi Hindus: Refugees International", Rediff.com, August 09, 2003 13:19 IST. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  37. ^ a b Bangladesh: The Next Afghanistan? by Hiranmay Karlekar. New Delhi: Sage, January 2006. ISBN 0-7619-3401-4
  38. ^ The 'Talibanization' of Bangladesh. The Nation (May 18, 2002 13:19 IST). Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  39. ^ The Talibanization of Bangladesh. metransparent.com (August 09, 2003 13:19 IST). Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  40. ^ [http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/3452.htm U.S Department of State: 2006 Census Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs
  41. ^ Hindu temples. Retrieved on 2006-08-26.
  42. ^ Frank Pallone (2004-05-17). "Persecution Of Hindus In Bangladesh (article mirrored from the US Library of Congress)". Retrieved on 2006-08-26.
  43. ^ "Congressman Pallone Condemns Persecution of Hindus in Bangladesh Following Meetings with Hindu American Foundation", Hindu American Foundation, 2004-05-20. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  44. ^ a b Bangladesh slammed for persecution of Hindus,Rediff.com
  45. ^ "Pakistan asks Hindus to quit military area", Rediff.com, November 07, 2003 10:04 IST. 
  46. ^ Reddy, B. Murlidhar. "Hindus in Pakistan allege humiliation", The Hindu. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  47. ^ DNA India - Musharraf's ratings about LTTE Tamils
  48. ^ Editorial The Jamaat Talks Backin The Bangladesh Observer December 30, 2005
  49. ^ Dr. N. Rabbee Remembering a Martyr Star weekend Magazine, The Daily Star (Bangladesh) December 16, 2005
  50. ^ Pakistan: The Ravaging of Golden Bengal,Time Magazine
  51. ^ a b US Department of State International Religious Freedom Report 2006
  52. ^ Swank, Grant. "Kidnap Hindu Girl, Force Marriage to Muslim: Pakistan". Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  53. ^ Opp MNAs fight in PM’s presence. Retrieved on 2006-08-23.
  54. ^ Another temple is no more,Dawn
  55. ^ Hindu temple in Lahore demolished,Rediff.com
  56. ^ Only Hindu Temple in Lahore demolished,Times of India
  57. ^ India protests demolition of Hindu temple in Pak,Times of India
  58. ^ Order for temple's reconstruction sought,Gulf News
  59. ^ Voice of America 18 October 2006
  60. ^ a b CRIN report page 4
  61. ^ UNHCR Pubication
  62. ^ US Lawmakers Condemn Taliban Treatment Of Hindus,T.C. Malhotra
  63. ^ [http://www.rediff.com/us/2001/jun/14us1.htm US lawmakers say: We are Hindus Aziz Haniffa]
  64. ^ Taliban to mark Afghan Hindus,CNN
  65. ^ India deplores Taleban decree against Hindus
  66. ^ Taliban: Hindus Must Wear Identity Labels,People's Daily
  67. ^ US lawmakers say: We are Hindus,Rediff.com
  68. ^ US lawmakers say: We are Hindus,Rediff.com
  69. ^ a b US Lawmakers Condemn Taliban Treatment Of Hindus,CNSnews.com
  70. ^ Immigrant Hinduism in Germany: Tamils from Sri Lanka and Their Temples,pluralism.org
  71. ^ Fiji Desecration,Dateline
  72. ^ "KAZAKHSTAN: State bulldozes Hare Krishna commune, bids to chair OSCE", Forum 18 News Service. Retrieved on 2007-01-24. 
  73. ^ "U.S. Embassy urges Kazakh authorities to end harassment of Hare Krishna", International Herald Tribune. Retrieved on 2007-01-24. 
  74. ^ Temple row - a dab of sensibility please,malaysiakini.com
  75. ^ Muslims Destroy Century-Old Hindu Temple,gatago.com
  76. ^ Pressure on multi-faith Malaysia,BBC
  77. ^ a b Hindu group protests 'temple cleansing' in Malaysia,Financial Express
  78. ^ "Britain to discuss Russian Harassment of Hindus at EU summit: Foreign Minister Douglas Alexander", Hindu Forum. Retrieved on 2006-08-26. 
  79. ^ International Religious Freedom Report 2004,United States Department of State
  80. ^ Marshall, Paul. Saudi Arabia's Religious Police Crack Down. Freedom House
  81. ^ a b c d e Singh, Sherry-Ann, Hinduism and the State in Trinidad,Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, Volume 6, Number 3, September 2005, pp. 353-365(13)
  82. ^ a b Trinidad and Tobago International Religious Freedom Report of the State Department of USA
  83. ^ Joshi, Khyati, The Racialization of Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism in the United States,Equity & Excellence in Education, Volume 39, Number 3, August 2006, pp. 211-226(16)
  84. ^ World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks: The anti-Islam American Backlash,refuseandassist.org
  85. ^ Hate crime reports up in wake of terrorist attacks,CNN.com
  • Memoir of the Emperor Timur (Malfuzat-i Timuri) Timur's memoirs on his invasion of India; describes in detail the massacre of Hindus, forced conversions to Islam and the plunder of the wealth of Hindustan (India). Compiled in the book: "The History of India, as Told by Its Own Historians. The Muhammadan Period", by Sir H. M. Elliot, Edited by John Dowson; London, Trubner Company; 1867–1877

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Serge Trifkovic, is a European historian, journalist and political analyst of Serbian origins. ... FrontPageMag. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI) is the standard encyclopaedia of the academic discipline of Islamic studies. ... ... ... Eric Stokes (1930-1999) was a composer, whose work spanned an eclectic range of influences and styles. ... The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a human rights group whose purpose is to provide a voice for the 2 million strong Hindu American community. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Kanwar Pal Gill, was born in Ludhiana, Punjab, India. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rediff. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hindu American Foundation (HAF) is a human rights group whose purpose is to provide a voice for the 2 million strong Hindu American community. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rediff. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Star is an English language daily newspaper published in Bangladesh. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The History of India as Told by its Own Historians is a book with eight volumes written by H. M. Elliot and John Dowson. ...

Further reading

  • Trifkovic, Serge (Sept. 11, 2002). The Sword of the Prophet: History, Theology, Impact on the World. Regina Orthodox Press. 
  • Sarkar, Jadunath. How the Muslims forcibly converted the Hindus of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to Islam. 
  • Firishta, Muhammad Qãsim Hindû Shãh; John Briggs (translator) (1829- 1981 Reprint). Tãrîkh-i-Firishta (History of the Rise of the Mahomedan Power in India). 
  • Nasrin, Taslima (1994). Lajja. India: Penguin Books India. ISBN 0-14-024051-9. 
  • Talib, Gurbachan (1950). Muslim League Attack on Sikhs and Hindus in the Punjab 1947. India: Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee. Online 1 Online 2 Online 3
  • Memoir of the Emperor Timur (Malfuzat-i Timuri) Timur's memoirs on his invasion of India; describes in detail the massacre of Hindus, forced conversions to Islam and the plunder of the wealth of Hindustan (India). Compiled in the book: "The History of India, as Told by Its Own Historians. The Muhammadan Period", by Sir H. M. Elliot, Edited by John Dowson; London, Trubner Company; 1867–1877

Serge Trifkovic, is a European historian, journalist and political analyst of Serbian origins. ... Jadunath Sarkar (Bengali: ) was a Bengali Indian historian born on 10 December 1870 in Karchamaria, Natore (part of current day Bangladesh). ... Taslima Nasrin Taslima Nasrin (Bangla: তসলিমা নাসরিন), also known as Taslima Nasreen, (born 25 August 1962 in Mymensingh, Bangladesh) is a Bengali Bangladeshi physician, author, feminist human rights activist and secular humanist. ... Lajja (Bengali: লজ্জা Lôjja) is a novel in Bengali by Taslima Nasrin, a writer of Bangladesh. ... Sardar Gurbachan Singh Talib (1911-1986) was a Sikh scholar and author. ... Muslim League Attack on Sikhs and Hindus in the Punjab 1947 is a book by Indian historian S. Gurbachan Singh Talib. ... The Shiromani Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee (Punjabi: , ) is a Sikh religious organisation responsible for the upkeep of gurdwaras. ... The History of India as Told by its Own Historians is a book with eight volumes written by H. M. Elliot and John Dowson. ...

See also

Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages[1]) is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Anti-Hindu leaflet launched by fundamentalist Christian churches Anti-Hindu prejudice is a negative perception against Hinduism, Hindus and Indian or Hindu culture. ... The Muslim conquest in the Indian subcontinent mainly took place from the 13th to the 16th centuries, though earlier Muslim conquests made limited inroads into the region, beginning during the period of the ascendancy of the Rajput Kingdoms in North India, from the 7th century onwards. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Hindu Temples - What Happened to Them is a book in two volumes by Sita Ram Goel, Arun Shourie, Harsh Narain, Jay Dubashi and Ram Swarup. ... Anti-Brahmanism, also known as Anti-Brahminism is discrimination, hostility or prejudice directed at the Hindu Brahmin caste. ... Muslim League Attack on Sikhs and Hindus in the Punjab 1947 is a book by Indian historian S. Gurbachan Singh Talib. ... Religious persecution is systematic mistreatment of an individual or group due to their religious affiliation. ... Religious intolerance is either intolerance motivated by ones own religious beliefs or intolerance against anothers religious beliefs or practices. ... This article is about religious pluralism. ... This article is about an Islamic term. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Spanish Leftists during the Red Terror Shoot at a statue of Christ The persecution of Christians is the religious persecution that Christians have endured as a consequence of professing their faith, both historically and in the current era. ... Conflicts between Muslims and non-Muslims made the persecution of both Muslims and non-Muslims a recurring phenomenon during the history of Islam. ... Many adherents of Roman religion have been persecuted, mainly by Christians. ... Many followers of Ancient Greek religion have experienced persecution, mainly from Christians. ... Many adherents of historical Germanic paganism and Germanic Neopaganism (Asatru, Odinism) have been persecuted, mainly by Christians. ... Idolatry, in Christian theology, is the worship of a created object rather than the true God. ...

External links

  • Dr. Koenraad Elst Was There an Islamic "Genocide" of Hindus?
  • Human Rights Commission for Bangladeshi Minoritites
  • The Hindu Minority in Bangladesh
  • Attacks on the Hindu Minority in Bangladesh - Amnesty International
  • Atrocities on Hindus catch US Congressmen's attention - United States Commission on Religious Freedom
  • Row over Krishna temple in Moscow
  • Islam's Pyramid of Extortion in India
  • Memoir of the Emperor Timur (Malfuzat-i Timuri) Timur's memoirs on his invasion of India; describes in detail the massacre of Hindus, forced conversions to Islam and the plunder of the wealth of Hindustan (India). Compiled in the book: "The History of India, as Told by Its Own Historians. The Muhammadan Period", by Sir H. M. Elliot, Edited by John Dowson; London, Trubner Company; 1867–1877

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Voice of the Martyrs Canada - Country Report - India (1294 words)
Though the majority of the people are Hindu, India is a secular nation with constitutional freedoms of speech and religion and, generally speaking, the government works to protect those freedoms.
In May 2005, the death sentence for the man convicted of murdering Australian missionary Graham Staines and his boys in 1999 was commuted from the death sentence to life imprisonment.
Other persecution faced by Christians is more subtle, as converts to Christianity are often cast out of their families and face poverty and ostracism.
Persecution of Hindus - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography (5821 words)
Hindus have been historically persecuted during the Islamic rule in the Indian subcontinent and the Portuguese rule in Goa.
Persecution of Hindus during Islamic rule was conducted by massive "ethnic cleansing", forced religious conversion, enslavement, desecration and demolition of Hindu temples and ashrams, and mass-rapes of Hindu women and sexual abuse of Hindu children.
Hindus, like Muslims, Sikhs, and members of other religious groups, experienced severe dislocation and violence during the massive population exchanges associated with the partition of India, as members of various communities moved to what they hoped was the relative safety of an area where they would be a religious majority.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m