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Encyclopedia > Perry Mason

Perry Mason is a fictional defense attorney who originally appeared in detective fiction by Erle Stanley Gardner. He appeared in over 80 novels and short stories, most of which involved his client being put on trial for murder. Typically, he was able to establish his client's innocence by demonstrating the guilt of another character. The author was one of the best-selling authors of all time, and had "135 million copies of his books in print in America alone in the year of his death." (1969).[1] The character of Perry Mason is also well-known from many appearances in film and television, including "television's most successful and longest-running lawyer series"[2] from 1957 to 1966, another series in 1973-1974, and more than 25 made-for-TV movies from 1985 to 1993. In most litigation under the common law adversarial system the defendant, perhaps with the assistance of counsel, may allege or present defenses (or defences) in order to avoid liability, civil or criminal. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... The Case of the Velvet Claws (1933), 1953 U.S. paperback edition The Case of the Negligent Nymph (1956), 1958 Pan paperback edition. ... This article is about the literary concept. ...

Contents

Character

The name "Perry Mason" dates to creator Gardner's childhood. As a child, Gardner was a reader of the magazine Youth's Companion. The magazine, best known for producing the original Pledge of Allegiance in 1891, was published in Boston, Massachusetts by the Perry Mason Company (later renamed "Perry Mason & Co." after the founder died). When Gardner created his fictional attorney, he borrowed the name of the company that published his favorite childhood magazine.[3] Youths Companion (1827-1929) was a popular American childrens magazine while it was published. ... The Pledge of Allegiance is a promise or oath of allegiance to the United States and the its national flag. ...


Gardner provided more information about Mason's character in the earliest novels, although his character is largely taken for granted in later novels and the television series/movies. In the first novel (The Case of the Velvet Claws, 1933), Perry Mason describes himself as follows:

You'll find that I'm a lawyer who has specialized in trial work, and in a lot of criminal work. ... I'm a specialist on getting people out of trouble. They come to me when they're in all sorts of trouble, and I work them out. ... If you look me up through some family lawyer or some corporation lawyer, he'll probably tell you that I'm a shyster. If you look me up through some chap in the District Attorney's office, he'll tell you that I'm a dangerous antagonist but he doesn't know very much about me.

Gardner depicts Mason as a lawyer who fights hard on behalf of his clients and who enjoys unusual, difficult or nearly hopeless cases. He frequently accepts clients on a whim based on his curiosity about their problem, for a minimal retainer, and finances the investigation of their cases himself if necessary. In The Case of the Caretaker's Cat (1935), his principal antagonist, District Attorney Hamilton Burger, says: "You're a better detective than you are a lawyer. When you turn your mind to the solution of a crime, you ferret out the truth." And in The Case of the Moth-Eaten Mink (1952), a judge who has just witnessed one of the lawyer's unusual tactics says: "Mr. Mason ... from time to time you seem to find yourself in predicaments from which you extricate yourself by unusual methods which invariably turn out to be legally sound. The Court feels you are fully capable of looking after your own as well as your clients' interests."


Another frequent antagonist, Lieutenant Tragg of the Homicide Squad, has a discussion with Mason about his approach to the law in The Case of the Drowsy Mosquito (1943). Mason is recovering from having been poisoned, and Tragg is investigating. He says:

How does it feel to be the victim for once? ... You've been sticking up for criminals and now you can see the other side of the picture."
"Not 'sticking up for criminals'," (Mason) protested indignantly. "I have never stuck up for any criminal. I have merely asked for the orderly administration of an impartial justice. ... Due legal process is my own safeguard against being convicted unjustly. To my mind, that's government. That's law and order."

Other than what we learn of his character from his actions in the novels, we know very little about Perry Mason. We are told nothing about his family, his background, his personal life, or his education. Paul Drake seems to be his only friend, and Della Street his only (unacknowledged) romantic interest. We only know that he lives in an apartment because he is occasionally wakened from sleep to go to his office -- he does not entertain anyone at home. We know his tastes in food, because many scenes take place in restaurants, and that he is an excellent driver, because he participates in the occasional car chase. Other than those scanty facts, there is so little physical description of him that the reader is not even really sure what he looks like. Paul Drake was the detective in the television lawyer series Perry Mason, played by William Hopper. ... Della Street, played by Barbara Hale, was Perry Masons confidential secretary in the television series and made-for-TV movies. ...


The movies from the 1930s were not closely based on the character of Perry Mason as revealed in the books and contain plot and character developments which are not taken as canonical in the remainder of the books and adaptations -- for instance, in one film Perry marries his long-time secretary Della Street, while Paul Drake turns into comic sidekick Spudsie Drake.


Novels

The Case of the Demure Defendant, a Perry Mason novel by Erle Stanley Gardner.
The Case of the Demure Defendant, a Perry Mason novel by Erle Stanley Gardner.

Erle Stanley Gardner "had spent more than twenty years practising law in California, and the knowledge he gained was put to good use in the Perry Mason stories, which hinge on points of law, forensic medicine or science as clever as a watch mechanism ... and also the total lack of characterization."[4] While the Mason novels were largely a form of pulp fiction of the sort that began Gardner's writing career, they are somewhat unusual in that the whodunnit mysteries usually involved two solutions: one in which the authorities believed (whereby Mason's client was guilty) and an alternative explanation (whereby Mason's client was innocent). The second half of each novel is invariably devoted to a lengthy courtroom scene, during which Mason arrives at the alternative explanation and proves it to the satisfaction of the court. "It is perfectly true that our author works to formula; in one sense, the plot never varies. Having said this, one must add that the variety of persons and circumstances and the ingenuity in contriving the details that Gardner dreamed up in his dozens of cases are astonishing and entrancing."[5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Case of the Velvet Claws (1933), 1953 U.S. paperback edition The Case of the Negligent Nymph (1956), 1958 Pan paperback edition. ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... A whodunit or whodunnit (for Who done it? and sometimes referred to as a Golden Age Mystery novel) is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle is paramount. ...


A hallmark of the stories is that Perry Mason (with the assistance of his devoted secretary Della Street and his faithful private investigator, Paul Drake), once embarked on a case, will juggle the evidence using unusual, even bizarre tactics, in order to mislead the police -- but (except for the very earliest novels) always in an ethical fashion. From "The Case Of The Long-Legged Models" (1958): "It's my contention, Della, that an attorney doesn't have to sit back and wait until a witness gets on the stand and then test his recollection simply by asking him questions. If facts can be shuffled in such a way that it will confuse a witness who isn't absolutely certain of his story, and if the attorney doesn't suppress, conceal, or distort any of the actual evidence, I claim the attorney is within his rights."


The influence of the television series has given the general public the impression that Mason is highly ethical. In the earliest novels, Mason was not above skullduggery to win a case. In The Case of the Counterfeit Eye (1935) he breaks the law a few times including manufacturing false evidence (glass eyes). Mason manipulates evidence and witnesses, resulting in the acquittal of the murderer in The Case of the Howling Dog (1934). The Case of the Curious Bride (1934) is "a good Perry Mason except for one great flaw, which the author would scarcely have been guilty of later on: he tampers with the evidence, by having a friend move into an apartment and testify to the state of the doorbells. ... One is left with the uncomfortable idea that maybe the murder did not take place as Mason reconstructs it."[5]


In later novels, the only crime which he can be seen to commit might be illegal entry, when he and Paul Drake are searching for evidence, and even then he would expect to put up a strong and effective defense leading to an acquittal. Hamilton Burger is constantly under the impression that Mason has done something illegal, but has never been able to prove it.


Gardner prefaced many of his later novels with tributes to coroners and forensic pathologists whose work was instrumental to solving cases. Gardner inserts his ideas about the importance of proper autopsies into many of his Mason novels. In The Case of the Fugitive Nurse, for instance, close scrutiny of dental records in the identification of burned bodies is a key point. In that same story, the possible use of additives to track illegal resale of medical narcotics is examined.


Adaptations

Movies

  • The Case Of The Howling Dog (1934) with Warren William as Perry Mason and Helen Trenholme as Della Street.
  • The Case Of The Curious Bride (1935) with Warren William as Perry Mason and Claire Dodd as Della Street. Slightly notable for the first-released American screen appearance of Errol Flynn as the corpse, who is seen alive but not speaking in a brief flashback.
  • The Case Of The Lucky Legs (1935) with Warren William as Perry Mason and Genevieve Tobin as Della Street.
  • The Case Of The Velvet Claws (1936) with Warren William as Perry Mason and Claire Dodd as Della Street Mason.
  • The Case Of The Black Cat (1936) (from The Case Of The Caretaker's Cat) with Ricardo Cortez as Perry Mason and June Travis as Della Street.
  • The Case Of The Stuttering Bishop (1937) with Donald Woods as Perry Mason and Ann Dvorak as Della Street.
  • Granny Get Your Gun (1940) (extremely loosely based on The Case Of The Dangerous Dowager, and not containing Perry Mason or any similar character). With May Robson as Minerva Hatton.

Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Claire Dodd on the cover of Picturegoer Magazine Claire Dodd (December 29, 1908 - November 23, 1973) was a successful film actress. ... Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn (June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959) was an Australian film actor, most famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and his flamboyant lifestyle. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Genevieve Tobin (November 29, 1899 – July 21, 1995) was an American actress. ... Warren William (2 December 1894 - 24 September 1948) was a Broadway and Hollywood actor, born Warren William Krech in Aitkin, Minnesota. ... Claire Dodd on the cover of Picturegoer Magazine Claire Dodd (December 29, 1908 - November 23, 1973) was a successful film actress. ... Ricardo Cortez, born Jacob Krantz (September 18, 1899 - April 28, 1977), was a film actor from Vienna, Austria. ... June Travis (b. ... Donald Woods (December 2, 1906 - March 5, 1998) was a Canadian film and television actor whose career spanned six decades. ... Ann Dvorak (born August 2, 1911; died December 10, 1979) was an American film actress. ...

Other adaptations

The Perry Mason character appeared in radio adaptations, comic books, and a short-lived (October 16, 1950June 21, 1952) comic strip. He was also the inspiration for The Whole Truth (1986) by James Cummins, a book-length collection of sestinas. A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... James Cummins is an American poet. ... The sestina is a highly structured form of poetry, invented by the Provençal troubadour Arnaut Daniel the late 12th century. ...


The daytime soap opera The Edge of Night was originally meant to be a daytime version of Perry Mason, until Gardner had a falling-out with CBS network officials. He was later mollified enough to allow production of the most famous incarnation of the character. The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... The Edge of Night was a long-running American television soap opera. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


Television series

Main articles: Perry Mason (TV series) and The New Adventures of Perry Mason

Perhaps the most famous incarnation came in the form of a CBS TV series that ran from 1957 to 1966, with Raymond Burr in the title role. Also starring were Barbara Hale, William Hopper, William Talman, and Ray Collins. The familiar theme song was from the Piano Concerto in F by George Gershwin. Perry Mason is a fictional defense attorney who originally appeared in detective fiction by Erle Stanley Gardner. ... The New Adventures of Perry Mason (sometimes referred to as The New Perry Mason or merely as Perry Mason) was a revival of the long-running hit television series about Erle Stanley Gardners brilliant defense attorney, but without the participation of any members of the original cast. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Raymond William Stacey Burr (May 21, 1917 – September 12, 1993) was an Emmy-nominated actor and vintner, perhaps best known for his roles in the television dramas Perry Mason and Ironside. ... Barbara Hale (born April 18, 1922 in DeKalb, Illinois) is an American actress best known as Perry Masons secretary Della Street. She first began appearing in motion pictures in 1943 after training at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. ... William Hopper (January 26, 1915 – March 6, 1970) was an American actor. ... Talman in the film noir classic The Hitch-Hiker William Whitney Talman Jr. ... Movie, stage and radio actor Ray Collins (December 10, 1889 - July 11, 1965) made his screen debut as Boss Jim Gettys in Citizen Kane and was one of the voices in Orson Welles infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast. ... Gershwin redirects here. ...


Several years after its cancellation, a new series, The New Adventures of Perry Mason, aired in the early 1970s and featured Monte Markham in the title role. Monte Markham (born 21 June 1935 in Manatee, Florida, United States) is an actor. ...


TV movies

Television producer Dean Hargrove resurrected the popular Mason character in a series of TV movies for NBC beginning in 1985. (He would create the Matlock series one year later.) Hargrove was able to bring back the two then-surviving major stars, Raymond Burr and Barbara Hale (reprising their roles as Mason and Della Street, respectively) for the first telefilm, Perry Mason Returns, in which Mason, now an appellate court judge, resigns his position to successfully defend his secretary, Della, on murder charges. William Katt (Hale's son) was cast as Paul Drake, Jr. (William Hopper, who played private investigator Paul Drake in the original television series, had died years earlier; Hopper's photograph appears on Paul Drake Jr's desk.) In the later TV Movies, Perry Mason used the services of attorney Ken Malansky (portrayed by William R. Moses). A television movie (also TV movie, TV-movie, made-for-TV movie, etc. ... This article is about the television network. ... This article is about the year. ... Ben Matlock in court Matlock was an American television legal drama starring Andy Griffith as attorney Ben Matlock. ... Raymond William Stacey Burr (May 21, 1917 – September 12, 1993) was an Emmy-nominated actor and vintner, perhaps best known for his roles in the television dramas Perry Mason and Ironside. ... Barbara Hale (born April 18, 1922 in DeKalb, Illinois) is an American actress best known as Perry Masons secretary Della Street. She first began appearing in motion pictures in 1943 after training at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... William Katt is an American film and television actor. ... William Hopper (January 26, 1915 – March 6, 1970) was an American actor. ... Billy R. Moses (sometimes also credited as William R. Moses) is an American actor, probably best known for playing Cole Gioberti in the prime-time soap opera Falcon Crest from 1981 to 1987. ...


The successful series of Perry Mason TV movies continued through 1993, the last of which (The Case of the Killer Kiss), being completed only weeks prior to Burr's death, was dedicated to his memory. The last of these films were set in Denver rather than Mason's traditional locale of Los Angeles; it was said that the character had moved there, but the real reason for the change was Denver's considerably lower production costs. After Burr's death, there were four more Perry Mason movies, starring either Paul Sorvino or Hal Holbrook as friends of Mason, who was ostensibly out of town. The movies were aired under the series title A Perry Mason Mystery. Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Denver redirects here. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Harold Rowe Holbrook, Jr. ...


Recurring characters

Recurring characters in the Perry Mason universe include: Image File history File links TCOT_One_Eyed_Witness. ... Image File history File links TCOT_One_Eyed_Witness. ... William Hopper (January 26, 1915 – March 6, 1970) was an American actor. ... Paul Drake was the detective in the television lawyer series Perry Mason, played by William Hopper. ...

  • Della Street, Mason's confidential secretary (played by Barbara Hale on the TV series).
  • Paul Drake, private investigator (played by William Hopper on the TV series).
  • Hamilton Burger - District Attorney (played by William Talman on the TV series)
  • Lieutenant Arthur Tragg - Police homicide investigator (played by Ray Collins on most of the episodes of the first TV series)
  • Lieutenant Steve Drumm - Another police homicide investigator (played by Richard Anderson on the the later episodes of the first TV series)
  • Lieutenant Andy Anderson - Yet another police homicide investigator (played by Wesley Lau on the first TV series, often replacing the ailing Ray Collins who continued to appear in the credits)
  • Terrance Clay - Restaurateur and friend of Perry (played in 8 episodes by Dan Tobin in the later episodes of the first TV series)
  • Sergeant Holcomb - Policeman often featured in the novels
  • Jackson - A junior attorney in Mason's law firm (in the TV series, he appears in a few episodes. )
  • Lieutenant Ed Brock - police commander (played by James McEachin in the telemovies)
  • Gertrude "Gertie" Lade - Mason's switchboard operator, an "incurable romantic" rarely seen in the TV series but a common presence in the novels. She was played in the first series by Connie Cezon and in the second by Brett Somers, later of Match Game fame.
  • David Gideon (played by Karl Held), who first appeared as a suspect in a TV episode (The Case Of The Grumbling Grandfather, 1961), and later appeared in 6 episodes (all 1961) as a young lawyer working with Perry Mason.

Della Street, played by Barbara Hale, was Perry Masons confidential secretary in the television series and made-for-TV movies. ... Barbara Hale (born April 18, 1922 in DeKalb, Illinois) is an American actress best known as Perry Masons secretary Della Street. She first began appearing in motion pictures in 1943 after training at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. ... Paul Drake was the detective in the television lawyer series Perry Mason, played by William Hopper. ... William Hopper (January 26, 1915 – March 6, 1970) was an American actor. ... Hamilton Burger was the Los Angeles district attorney who was the nemesis of Perry Mason in the long-running series of novels, films, and radio and television programs featuring the fictional defense attorney created by Erle Stanley Gardner. ... Talman in the film noir classic The Hitch-Hiker William Whitney Talman Jr. ... Collins in The Racket (1951) Ray Collins (December 10, 1889 – July 11, 1965) was an American actor in film, stage, radio, and television. ... Richard Anderson as Oscar Goldman in The Six Million Dollar Man Richard Anderson, born Richard Norman Anderson (born August 8, 1926 in Long Branch, New Jersey, USA) is an actor in film and television. ... ... Movie, stage and radio actor Ray Collins (December 10, 1889 - July 11, 1965) made his screen debut as Boss Jim Gettys in Citizen Kane and was one of the voices in Orson Welles infamous War of the Worlds radio broadcast. ... James McEachin (b. ... Brett Somers (July 11, 1924 – September 15, 2007)[1] was a Canadian-born American actress, singer, and comedienne. ... The Match Game was an American television game show, most often hosted by Gene Rayburn. ... Carl Held (sometimes credited as Karl Held) (born 19 September 1931 New Jersey) is an actor who has worked extensively in both American and British television. ...

Title listings

Main article: Perry Mason (novels)

See Perry Mason. ...

TV movies

  • Perry Mason Returns (1985)
  • The Case of the Notorious Nun (1986)
  • The Case of the Shooting Star (1986)
  • The Case of the Lost Love (1987)
  • The Case of the Sinister Spirit (1987)
  • The Case of the Murdered Madam (1987)
  • The Case of the Scandalous Scoundrel (1987)
  • The Case of the Avenging Ace (1988)
  • The Case of the Lady in the Lake (1988)
  • The Case of the Lethal Lesson (1989)
  • The Case of the Musical Murder (1989)
  • The Case of the All-Star Assassin (1989)
  • The Case of the Poisoned Pen (1990)
  • The Case of the Desperate Deception (1990)
  • The Case of the Silenced Singer (1990)
  • The Case of the Defiant Daughter (1990)
  • The Case of the Ruthless Reporter (1991)
  • The Case of the Maligned Mobster (1991)
  • The Case of the Glass Coffin (1991)
  • The Case of the Fatal Fashion (1991)
  • The Case of the Fatal Framing (1992)
  • The Case of the Reckless Romeo (1992)
  • The Case of the Heartbroken Bride (1992)
  • The Case of the Skin-Deep Scandal (1993)
  • The Case of the Telltale Talk Show Host (1993)
  • The Case of the Killer Kiss (1993)

After the death of Raymond Burr, four films were produced as "A Perry Mason Mystery" with Della Street but without the Perry Mason character:

  • The Case of the Wicked Wives (1993) starring Paul Sorvino as Anthony Caruso
  • The Case of the Lethal Lifestyle (1994) starring Hal Holbrook as "Wild Bill" McKenzie
  • The Case of the Grimacing Governor (1994) starring Hal Holbrook as "Wild Bill" McKenzie
  • The Case of the Jealous Jokester (1995) starring Hal Holbrook as "Wild Bill" McKenzie

Paul Anthony Sorvino (born April 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an Italian-American character actor whose career has largely been the portrayal of authority figures, both as legal enforcer and criminal, in television, stage, and film. ... Harold Rowe Holbrook, Jr. ...

In popular culture

  • The Blues Brothers recorded a cover version of the song, called "Perry Mason Theme" which was included in The Definitive Blues Brothers Collection. It was later used in Blues Brothers 2000 (1998) where it was played during a scene in the film where Elwood Blues (Dan Aykroyd) and Mack (John Goodman) leave two members of the Russian mob unconscious in an alley.
  • The 1995 Ozzy Osbourne album Ozzmosis features the song titled "Perry Mason", whose lyrics allude to the character.
  • In El Chavo del Ocho, there is an episode when Professor Jirafales suggests that they do a judgement of the Quico's cat murder case. And so, Don Ramón suggests that they do as in the TV series of "Perro Menso" ("Silly Dog"). And then, Jirafales corrects him saying "PERRY MASON!"
  • In the Portuguese version of El Chavo del Ocho, Don Ramón (Seu Madruga) suggests that they do as the TV series of "Pede Mais Um" ("Ask for another one"). And as the original version of the series, Professor Jirafales corrects him yelling "Perry Mason!!!".
  • The Pixies paid tribute to the show by incorporating part of the theme tune into their song "Space (I Believe In)" on the album Trompe le Monde. Singer Frank Black announces "Now I'm going so sing the Perry Mason theme" before singing it under vocal distortion.
  • In the BBC television sitcom May to December, solicitor Alec Caldwell (portrayed by Anton Rodgers) is a huge Perry Mason fan, and often speaks privately to a large poster of Raymond Burr hanging on his office wall.
  • William Hanna and Joseph Barbera stretched Gardner's character by creating "Perry Masonite", in an episode of "The Flintstones." The opposing counsel, representing the Rubbles' attempt to adopt Bamm-Bamm in the same episode was named "Bronto Burger".
  • Mad Magazine did a spoof on the 1950's TV series.
  • Fast Forward sent-up the 1950's TV Series.
  • Jack Benny once did a sketch about Perry Mason actually losing a case. Benny is accused of not being funny, and Perry Mason is there to defend him, but unable to prove his client is indeed funny.
    • In a dream sequence in a TV episode of the Jack Benny Program, Raymond Burr as Mason defends Benny on the charges of killing a rooster. In Benny's dream, Mason is incompetent and loses the case easily.
  • Roger Fox of the comic strip FoxTrot gets a speeding ticket, and mentions that he will try to come up with a Perry Mason routine to get out of it.
  • During a case in the TV law drama, "Boston Legal," a method of proving reasonable doubt, was credited as being used before him by Perry Mason, to much success.
  • A mystery novel by Barbara Paul, But He Was Already Dead When I Got There (1987), is dedicated by the author to her viewing of the original Perry Mason TV series, and largely inspired by it.
  • In an episode of the online sketch comedy group, The 15 Minute Show, one episode titled "Eat Shit Perry Mason" features Jesus Christ as a lawyer. After winning the case, Jesus looks at the camera and states, "Eat shit, Perry Mason!".

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Blues Brothers 2000 is a 1998 musical/comedy film and sequel to the highly successful 1980 film The Blues Brothers. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Blues brothers bar be merged into this article or section. ... Daniel Edward Aykroyd CM (born July 1, 1952) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning Canadian/American comedian, actor, screenwriter, and musician. ... Not to be confused with Johnny Goodman (TV producer), Johnny Goodman, or John C. Goodman. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Ozzy redirects here. ... El Chavo del Ocho was a famous Mexican television sitcom that also became a popular hit in Latin America (including Brazil), Spain and other countries. ... El Chavo del Ocho was a famous Mexican television sitcom that also became a popular hit in Latin America (including Brazil), Spain and other countries. ... The Pixies[1] are an American alternative rock band formed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1985. ... Trompe le Monde is the Pixies fourth and final full-length studio album, released on October 7, 1991 through the 4AD record label. ... For other persons named Frank Black, see Frank Black (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... May to December was a BBC sitcom broadcast 1989-1994 on BBC1 and produced by Cinema Verity. ... A solicitor is a type of lawyer in many common law jurisdictions, such as the United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Republic of Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and in a few regions of the United States. ... Anton Rodgers (born 10 January 1933, Wisbech, Cambridgeshire) is a British actor. ... hello i am godWilliam Denby Bill Hanna (July 14, 1910 – March 22, 2001) was an American animator, director, producer, cartoon artist, and co-founder, together with Joseph Barbera, of Hanna-Barbera. ... Joseph Roland Joe Barbera (March 24, 1911 – December 18, 2006) was an American animator, cartoon artist, storyboard artist, director, producer, and co-founder, together with William Hanna, of Hanna-Barbera. ... The Flintstones is an American animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois – December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. ... This article is about the comic strip; for other uses, see Foxtrot (disambiguation). ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Barbara Paul is an American writer of detective stories and science fiction. ...

References and footnotes

  1. ^ Bloody Murder by Julian Symons, Faber and Faber, 1972, with revisions in Penguin Books 1974, ISBN 0 14 003794 2
  2. ^ The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network TV Shows, 1946-Present, Brooks and Marsh, Ballantine 1979, ISBN 0 345 28248 5
  3. ^ Erle Stanley Gardner biographic material by William F. Nolan
  4. ^ Bloody Murder by Julian Symons, Faber and Faber 1972, with revisions in Penguin Books 1974, ISBN 0 14 003794 2
  5. ^ a b Barzun, Jacques and Taylor, Wendell Hertig. A Catalogue of Crime. New York: Harper & Row. 1971, revised and enlarged edition 1989. ISBN 0-06-015796-8

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Perry Mason - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2149 words)
Perry Mason is also the name of a television series which ran for nine seasons starting in 1957 and starred Raymond Burr in the title role.
While the Mason novels were largely a form of pulp fiction of the sort that began Gardner's writing career, they are somewhat unusual in that the whodunnit mysteries usually involved two solutions: one which the authorities believed (in which case Mason's client was guilty) and an alternative explanation (in which Mason's client was innocent).
Mason was portrayed by Raymond Burr in a television series which ran on CBS from 1957 to 1966.
Perry Mason (1041 words)
Perry Mason is the longest running lawyer show in American television history.
Mason's fans include lawyers and judges who were influenced by this series to enter their profession.
Mason, played by Raymond Burr, is teamed with two talented and ever faithful assistants: trusty and beautiful secretary Della Street, played by Barbara Hale, and the suave but boyish private detective Paul Drake, played by William Hopper.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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