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Encyclopedia > Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations

The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations (PSI) of the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is currently chaired by Senator Norm Coleman (R-MN), with Carl Levin (D-MI) as a ranking member. Senators Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), Daniel K. Akaka (D-Hawaii), Tom Coburn (R-Oklahoma), Thomas R. Carper (D-Delaware), Lincoln D. Chafee (R-Rhode Island), Mark Dayton (D-Minnesota), Robert F. Bennett (R-Utah), Frank Lautenberg (D-New Jersey), Pete V. Domenici (R-New Mexico), Mark Pryor (D-Arkansas), and John W. Warner (R-Virginia) also serve on the subcommittee. The United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia, and the United States Postal Service. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Norm Coleman Norman Bertram Norm Coleman Jr. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Senator Carl Levin Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... Ranking member, in American politics, is a term used to refer to the member of a committee in Congress who is the longest-serving member of the party not in the majority (the longest-serving member of the majority is the chairman). ... Theodore Fulton Ted Stevens (born November 18, 1923) is an American politician from Alaska. ... Daniel Kahikina Akaka (born September 11, 1924) is a U.S. Senator from Hawaii and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Sen. ... Categories: People stubs | United States Senators | Governors of Delaware | Vietnam War veterans | 1947 births ... Lincoln Chafee Lincoln Davenport Chafee (born March 26, 1953) is a United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Mark Dayton Mark Dayton (born January 26, 1947) is a Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party US Senator from Minnesota who took office in 2001. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Frank Lautenberg at a press conference in Washington, D.C. Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is an American politician. ... Peter Vichi Domenici (born May 7, 1932) has served as a Republican U.S. Senator from New Mexico continuously since 1973. ... Mark Lunsford Pryor (born January 10, 1963) is a politician in Arkansas. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as a Republican Senator from Virginia since 1978. ...


In 20042005, the subcommittee began investigating abuses in the United Nations Oil-for-Food program in which the Swiss company Cotecna paid UN Secretary General Kojo Annan's son consulting fees. 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kojo Annan (July 1973 in Geneva - ) is the son of UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. ...

Contents


History

The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations is the oldest subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, having been created at the same time as the Committee on Government Operations in 1952. 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


According to Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk of the subcommittee for more than 30 years, the subcommittee calls itself "permanent" but it really is not; nor is it independent of the full Government Operations (now Governmental Affairs) Committee. The PSI has, however, been a useful and powerful tool for several of the chairmen of the committee because it has a broad mandate to investigate inefficiency, mismanagement, and corruption in government.


Truman Committee

The PSI is sometimes thought of as the successor to the Senate Special Committee to Investigate the National Defense Program, 1941-1948, also known as the "Truman Committee". When the Truman Committee was terminated in 1948, the Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Expenditures in Executive Departments continued that committee's investigation of war contracts and procurement of the F-11, the so-called "flying boat". The subcommittee also assumed responsibility for the records of the Truman Committee. 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Grumman F-11 Tiger was a one-seat, carrier based, United States Navy fighter aircraft in operation during the 1950s and 1960s. ... Boeing 314 A flying boat is an aircraft that is designed to take off and land on water, in particular a type of seaplane which uses its fuselage as a floating hull (instead of pontoons mounted below the fuselage). ...


Under the chairmanship of Homer S. Ferguson of Michigan (1948) and Clyde R. Hoey of North Carolina (1949-1952), the Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Expenditures in Executive Departments held hearings on such matters as export control violations, the trial of Nazi war criminal Ilse Koch, the Mississippi Democratic Party and sales of post office jobs, and the "5 percenters," so-called because these men, including Presidential aide Gen. Harry Vaughan, were accused of charging a 5-percent commission for their influence in securing government contracts. Homer Samuel Ferguson (February 25, 1889 – December 17, 1982) was a U.S. Senator from Michigan. ... Clyde Roark Hoey (11 December 1877 __ 12 May 1954) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina from 1937 to 1941. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For alternate meanings, see National socialism. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... Ilse Koch, née Kohler (September 22, 1906 - September 1, 1967), was the wife of Karl Koch, the commandant of the concentration camp Buchenwald. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States. ...


McCarthy

In the 83rd Congress, under its new chairman, Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin, the subcommittee (now known as the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations) greatly increased the number of investigations and number of witnesses called. His subcommittee held 169 hearings throughout 1953 and 1954. McCarthy targeted Voice of America, the Government Printing Office, the Army Signal Corps, General Electric, and Allis-Chalmers. The hearings also investigated such matters as subversives in the Department of State, Department of Defense, and U.S. Army; the Voice of America and the United States Information Service libraries; Korean war atrocities; communist infiltration of the United Nations; and the transfer to the Soviet Union of occupation currency plates. In April 1954, McCarthy`s exchange of charges with Secretary of the Army Robert T. Stevens led to the appointment of a special subcommittee of the PSI to investigate the charges. Chaired by Karl Mundt of South Dakota, the proceedings became known as the Army-McCarthy Hearings. Joseph McCarthy This article is about the American politician. ... One of the periods of glaciation was also termed the Wisconsin glaciation. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Voice of America (VOA) is the official broadcasting service of the United States government. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) provides printed (and now electronic) copies of documents produced by and for all federal agencies, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and EPA. Court... The U.S. Army Signal Corps was in a part of the United States Army founded in 1861 by Major Albert J. Myer, a physician by training. ... The General Electric Company, or GE, (NYSE: GE) is a multinational technology and services company. ... The Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. ... Subversion is an overturning or uprooting. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The Voice of America (VOA) is the official broadcasting service of the United States government. ... The United States Information Agency (USIA), which existed from 1953 to 1999, was a United States agency devoted to what it called public diplomacy. ... The Korean War (Korean: 한국전쟁/韓國戰爭), from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953, was a conflict between North Korea and South Korea. ... Communism - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... See: espionage, urban exploration, entryism, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. ... The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945 and now made up of 191 states. ... A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Army The United States Secretary of the Army has statutory responsibility for all matters relating to the United States Army: manpower, personnel, reserve affairs, installations, environmental issues, weapons systems and equipment acquisition, communications, and financial management. ... Robert Ten Broeck Stevens (1899 - 1983) was a U.S. businessman. ... Karl Earl Mundt (1900 - 1974) was a U.S. educator and a Republican United States Senator from South Dakota from 1948 to 1973. ... State nickname: The Mount Rushmore State Other U.S. States Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Governor Mike Rounds Official languages English Area 199,905 km² (17th)  - Land 196,735 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... The Army-McCarthy hearings (April 22 to June 17, 1954) were a congressional inquiry convened to investigate a convoluted set of charges made by Senator Joseph R. McCarthy (Republican, Wisconsin), at the U.S. Army and vice versa. ...


Labor racketeering

From 1955 until 1972, John L. McClellan of Arkansas chaired the PSI. McClellan continued certain investigations initiated during McCarthy's chairmanship, and added new inquiries relating to communist activities in the United States and to business activities and alleged improper activities by Eisenhower Administration appointees and political associates. In the 86th Congress (1957), members of the Subcommittee were joined by Members of the Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee on a special committee to investigate labor racketeering. Chaired by Senator McClellan and staffed by Robert F. Kennedy, the Subcommittee’s Chief Counsel, and other staff members, this special committee directed much of its attention to criminal influence over the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, most famously calling Teamsters’ leaders Dave Beck and Jimmy Hoffa to testify. The televised hearings of the special committee also introduced Senators Barry Goldwater and John F. Kennedy to the nation, as well as leading to passage of the Landrum-Griffin Labor Act. After each day’s hearings, moreover, Robert Kennedy and other staff members, including Pierre Salinger and Kenneth O’Donnell, would meet in the committee’s back room to plan strategies for Senator John Kennedy’s upcoming 1960 presidential campaign. 1955 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... John Little McClellan (25 February 1896 – 28 November 1977) was a member of the US Senate|United States Senate and United States House of Representatives from Arkansas. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... Order: 34th President Vice President: Richard Nixon Term of office: January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961 Preceded by: Harry S. Truman Succeeded by: John F. Kennedy Date of birth: October 14, 1890 Place of birth: Denison, Texas Date of death: March 28, 1969 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Kennedy . Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... The International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT), formerly known by the name International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, is one of the largest labor unions in the United States. ... James Riddle Jimmy Hoffa (14 February 1913 - 30 July, 1975?) was a noted American labor leader who is also well-known in popular culture for the mysterious circumstances surrounding his still-unexplained disappearance and presumed death. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician and a founding figure in the modern conservative movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American culture from the Northeast to the West. ... Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth: May 29, 1917 Place of birth: Brookline, Massachusetts Date of death: November 22, 1963 Place of death: Dallas, Texas First... Pierre Salinger. ...


After the select committee expired in 1960, the PSI continued to investigate labor racketeering and other labor-related matters. From 1961 through 1968, it also investigated gambling and organized crime in which Joe Valachi testified about the activities of the "Cosa Nostra", the Billie Sol Estes case, irregularities in missile procurement, procurement of the TFX fighter plane, excessive risks in underwriting Federal Housing Administration mortgages, riots, and civil disorders, the Agency for International Development commodity import program, and procurement of railway bridges for South Vietnam under the counterinsurgency program. The Subcommittee’s investigations also led to passage of major legislation against organized crime, most notably the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) provision of the Crime Control Act of 1970. 1961 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Gambling (or betting) is any behavior involving risking money or valuables (making a wager or placing a stake) on the outcome of a game, contest, or other event in which the outcome of that activity depends partially or totally upon chance or upon ones ability to do something. ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... Joseph Valachi Joseph Joe Cargo Valachi (September 22, 1903 - April 3, 1971) was the first Mafia member to publicly acknowledge the existence of the Mafia. ... La Cosa Nostra is the name by which members of the Mafia in the United States refer to the organization. ... Billie Sol Estes (b. ... A U.S. Air Force F-111 The General Dynamics F-111 Aardvark (the nickname was unofficial for most of its lifespan, but it was officially named Aardvark at its retirement ceremony for the United States Air Force) is a long-range strategic bomber, reconnaissance, and tactical strike aircraft. ... The Federal Housing Administration was begun as part of the New Deal in 1934. ... Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... Civil disorder is a broad term that is typically used by law enforcement to describe one or more forms of disturbance caused by a group of people. ... USAID logo The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ... Official language Vietnamese Capital Saigon Last President Duong Van Minh Last Prime Minister Vu Van Mau Area  - Total  - % water 173,809km² N/A Population  - Total  - Density 19,370,000 (1973 est. ... The U.S. Army term counterinsurgency operations arose in fall 2004 to describe ongoing operations in Iraq and related operations as far back as the Vietnam War. ... RICO or the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act is a United States law which provides for extended penalties for criminal acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization. ...


In 1973, Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson, a Democrat from Washington, replaced McClellan as the Subcommittee’s chairman and Senator Charles Percy, an Illinois Republican, became the Ranking Minority Member. During Senator Jackson’s chairmanship, the Subcommittee conducted landmark hearings into energy shortages and the operation of the oil industry. Henry M. Jacksons home Everett, Washington Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ... Charles H. Percy (born September 27, 1919) was chairman of the Bell & Howell Corporation from 1949 to 1964 and Republican United States Senator for Illinois from 1967 to 1985. ... The Oil industry brings to market what is currently considered the lifeblood of nearly all other industry, if not industrialized civilization itself. ...


Nunn-Roth era

The regular reversals of political fortunes in the Senate of the 1980s and 1990s saw Senator Sam Nunn trade chairmanship three times with Delaware Republican William Roth. Nunn served from 1979 to 1980 and again from 1987 to 1995, while Roth served from 1981 to 1986, and again from 1995 to 1996. Senator Roth led a wide range of investigations into commodity investment fraud, off-shore banking schemes, money laundering, and child pornography. Senator Nunn inquired into federal drug policy, the global spread of chemical and biological weapons, abuses in federal student aid programs, computer security, airline safety, and health care fraud. Samuel Augustus Nunn (born September 8, 1938) is co-chairman and chief executive officer of the NTI (Nuclear Threat Initiative), a charitable organization working to reduce the global threats from nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. ... William Victor Roth, Jr. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... The term child pornography (sometimes referred to as kiddie porn) generally refers to pornography featuring a child; however, the precise definition of pornography and child varies by region and country. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... Computer security is the effort to create a secure computing platform, designed so that agents (users or programs) can only perform actions that have been allowed. ... // Institutions Certification In most countries, aircraft have to be certified by the aviation authority to be allowed to fly. ... Health care or healthcare is an industry associated with the the prevention, treatment, and management of illness along with the promotion of mental, physical and spiritual well-being through the services offered by the medical and allied health professions. ...


In January 1997 Republican Senator Susan Collins of Maine, became the first woman to chair the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Senator John Glenn of Ohio became Ranking Member. Upon Senator Glenn’s retirement from the Senate, Senator Carl Levin became Ranking Member in 1999. In June 2001, when the Democrats resumed control of the Senate, Senator Levin assumed the chairmanship of the Subcommittee until January 2003 when Senator Norm Coleman assumed the Chairmanship. Susan Collins Susan Margaret Collins (born December 7, 1952 in Caribou, Maine) is the junior U.S. Senator from Maine and a Republican. ... John Glenn This article is about the astronaut. ... Senator Carl Levin Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan. ...


External links

  • Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations
  • Oral Interview with Ruth Young Watt
  • Executive Sessions of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations vol. 1, Eighty-third Congress, First Session (1953) [PDF 950 pages]
  • Executive Sessions of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations vol. 2, Eighty-third Congress, First Session (1953) [PDF 900 pages]
  • Executive Sessions of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations vol. 3, Eighty-third Congress, First Session (1953)] [PDF 927 pages]
  • Executive Sessions of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations vol. 4, Eighty-third Congress, First Session (1953)] [PDF 920 pages]
  • Executive Sessions of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Government Operations vol. 5, Eighty-third Congress, First Session (1953)] [PDF 619 pages]

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