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Encyclopedia > Peripheral vascular disease

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a disease in the large blood vessels of the arms, legs, and feet. People who have had diabetes for a long time may develop PVD because major blood vessels in their arms, legs, and feet are blocked and these limbs do not receive enough blood. The signs of PVD are aching pains in the arms, legs, and feet (especially when walking) and foot sores that heal slowly. Although people with diabetes cannot always avoid PVD, doctors say they have a better chance of avoiding it if they take good care of their feet, do not smoke, and keep both their blood pressure and diabetes under good control.


See also: Macrovascular disease


  Results from FactBites:
 
Peripheral Vascular Disease: Iliac, Popliteal, Femoral, Renal, Carotid, and Subclavian Arteries (788 words)
Peripheral vascular disease is a form of atherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries, and is a progressive disease process.
In the peripheral or non-heart vessels, this is most likely to occur in the iliac arteries (lower abdomen leading to the legs), the femoral and popliteal arteries (legs), the renal arteries (kidneys) and the carotid arteries (in the neck leading to the brain) and subclavian arteries (arms).
Symptoms of peripheral vascular disease in the carotid arteries include: sudden, temporary weakness or numbness of the face, arm and/or leg on one side of the body; temporary loss of speech or trouble speaking or understanding speech; temporary dimness or loss of vision, particularly in one eye; and unexplained dizziness, unsteadiness or sudden falls.
Peripheral vascular disease - definition of Peripheral vascular disease in Encyclopedia (151 words)
Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a disease in the large blood vessels of the arms, legs, and feet.
People who have had diabetes for a long time may develop PVD because major blood vessels in their arms, legs, and feet are blocked and these limbs do not receive enough blood.
Although people with diabetes cannot always avoid PVD, doctors say they have a better chance of avoiding it if they take good care of their feet, do not smoke, and keep both their blood pressure and diabetes under good control.
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