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Encyclopedia > Perihan Magden

Perihan Magden (born 1960) is a Turkish writer of prose and poetry and a columnist for the newspaper Radikal. She is currently being prosecuted in Turkey for calling for conscientious objection to mandatory military service in that country. Her prosecution has been criticized by human rights groups around the world and comes several months after a Turkish court dropped a case against Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk, who had been charged with "insulting Turkishness".[1] Her arrest is seen as complicating Turkey's negotiations for membership with the European Union.[2] A conscientious objector is an individual whose personal beliefs are incompatible with military service, or sometimes with any role in the armed forces. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Orhan Pamuk posing with his most popular book My Name is Red. ...

Contents


Life

Magden was born in 1960 in Istanbul. She pursued her third-level education at Istanbul's prestigious Bogazici University, where she graduated from the Psychology Department.[2] Magden is divorced from her husband and is raising their 12-year-old daughter by herself, supported only by what she earns as a writer.[3] Boğaziçi University is one of the most prominent educational institutions in Turkey, located at the European Side of the Bosphorus, Istanbul (hence the name wich means University of Bosphorus). The institution currently known as Boğaziçi University was established in 1971 on the campus of Robert College...


She lives in Istanbul.


Writings

Internationally-renowned Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk has called Magden "one of the most inventive and outspoken writers of our time."[3] According to Pamuk, "The way (Magden) twists and turns the Turkish language, the delight she takes in the thrust and pull of popular culture, and her brilliant forays into subjects that everyone thinks about and then decides not to put into words, 'just in case'--these have earned her the love of her readers and the respect of her fellow writers."[3] Orhan Pamuk posing with his most popular book My Name is Red. ...


In addition to writing editorial columns for Turkish newspapers, Magden has also published fictional novels and a collection of poetry. Magden's novel Hasta Dösegi (Two Girls), published in 2005, was praised for pushing "Turkish beyond its conventional literary patterns" and compared to J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye for the way she had captured adolescent anguish.[4] Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... Look up poetry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... The Catcher in the Rye is a famous novel by J. D. Salinger. ...


Arrest and Trial

Magden is currently facing prosecution by the Turkish government in relation to a December 2005 column in the weekly news magazine Yeni Aktuel. In the column she strongly defended the actions of Mehmet Tarhan, a young Turkish man jailed for his refusal to perform military service, which in Turkey is mandatory.[5] In this column, entitled "Conscientious Objection is a Human Right," Magden stated that the United Nations, of which Turkey is a member, acknowledges conscientious objection as a human right.[3] This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


In response to the column, the Turkish military accused her of attempting to turn the Turkish people against military service and filed a complaint against her.[6] A warrant was issued for her arrest in April 2006 and her trial is set for late July; the most severe sentence she may face if convicted under Article 301 of the Turkish Penal Code is three years' imprisonment. Under Turkish law, there is no provision for conscientious objection to mandatory military service.[1] A conscientious objector is an individual whose personal beliefs are incompatible with military service, or sometimes with any role in the armed forces. ...


When asked about her situation, Magden replied, "It's shocking that they are putting me on trial. I've no idea what will happen. The case could finish tomorrow or it could stretch on and on. The unnerving thing about the courts is they are so unpredictable, it's like a lottery. It's torture."[7]


Magden is evidently one of several journalists and writers who were charged in court recently by prosecutors because their writings "threaten Turkey’s unity or the integrity of the state."[2]


Reaction to arrest

Magden's arrest has been condemned by human rights and writing organizations both within Turkey and around the world.[5] In a show of support for Magden, newspapers in Turkey have republished the column that lead to criminal charges against her.[8]


In addition, the prosecution of Magden is being closely watched by the European Union, which is in negotiations with Turkey over that country's possible membership in the organization.[2]


Bibliography (partial)

  • Haberci Cocuk Cinayetleri (Messenger Boy Murders), 1991
  • Refakatci (The Escort), novel, 1994
  • Mutfak Kazalari (Kitchen Accidents). poetry collection, 1995
  • Hic Bunlary Kendine Dert Etmeye Deger Mi?, 1997
  • Kapy Acyk Arkany Dön ve Cyk, 1998
  • Fakat Ne Yazyk ki Sokak Boptu, 1999
  • Hasta Dösegi (Two Girls), novel, 2005

Daniel Defoes Robinson Crusoe; title page of 1719 newspaper edition A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended fictional narrative in prose. ... Look up poetry in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Turkish writer in call-up trial," BBC News, June 7, 2006, Accessed June 7, 2006.
  2. ^ a b c d "Turkish journalist in court for 'undermining armed forces'" by Vincent Boland, Financial Times, June 7, 2006, accessed June 7, 2006.
  3. ^ a b c d "A question of conscience: Orhan Pamuk defends Turkey's wittiest and most controversial female columnist" by Orhan Pamuk, The Guardian Unlimited, Books Section, June 3, 2006, accessed June 7, 2006.
  4. ^ Review of 2 Girls, by Perihan Magden (trans by Brendan Freely), by Alev Adil, The Independent, November 9, 2005, accessed June 7, 2006.
  5. ^ a b PEN Writers In Prison page about Magden. Accessed June 7, 2006
  6. ^ "The Perihan Magden case" by Alev Adil, New Statesman, Accessed June 7, 2006.
  7. ^ "Leading Turkish writer faces jail after incurring wrath of military" by Peter Popham, The Independent, June 7, 2006, accessed June 8, 2006.
  8. ^ Mağden’s case puts Turkey’s conscience on trial Turkish Daily News, June 7, 2006, accessed June 7, 2006.

External links

  • "Courage Does Not Reign" by Perihan Magden. Translated from the Turkish by Alin Ince.
  • "The Secret Meanings of Unappreciated Words" by Perihan Magden. Translated from the Turkish by Cem Yegül.

 
 

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