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Encyclopedia > Performing arts

The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artist's own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some art object. The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Plastic Arts are those visual arts that involve the use of materials that can be moulded or modulated in some way, often in three dimensions. ... In fine art, a work of art (or artwork or work) is a creation, such as a song, book, sculpture or a painting, that has been made in order to be a thing of beauty in itself or a symbolic statement of meaning, rather than having a practical function. ...

Contents

Types of performing arts

Performing arts include acrobatics, busking, comedy, dance, magic, music, opera, film, juggling, marching arts, such as brass bands, theatre, and circus arts. High wire act Acrobatics (from Greek Akros, high and bat, walking) is one of the performing arts, and is also practiced as a sport. ... Busking is the practice of doing live performances in public places to entertain people, usually to solicit donations and tips. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Marching Arts include mainly marching bands and drum corps. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Circus Arts refers to a body of performing arts featured in, based upon, derived from, or inspired by circus productions. ...


Artists who participate in these arts in front of an audience are called performers, including actors, comedians, dancers, musicians, and singers. Performing arts are also supported by workers in related fields, such as songwriting and stagecraft. Actors in period costume sharing a joke while waiting between takes during location filming An actor or actress is a person who acts, or plays a role, in a dramatic production. ... A comedian, or comic, is an entertainer who amuses an audience by making them laugh. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... Ercole de Roberti: Concert, c. ... A songwriter is someone who writes either the lyrics or the music for songs. ... Stagecraft (or Technical Theatre) is the art of building, attaching, and rigging scenery for theater and television as well as other technical aspects of performance including sound, costuming, makeup, and lighting. ...


Performers often adapt their appearance, such as with costumes and stage makeup, etc. Variation in the physical appearance of humans is believed by anthropologists to be an important factor in the development of personality and social relations in particular physical attractiveness. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... For other uses, see Cosmetic. ...


There is also a specialized form of fine art in which the artists perform their work live to an audience. This is called Performance art. Most performance art also involves some form of plastic art, perhaps in the creation of props. Dance was often referred to as a plastic art during the Modern dance era. Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... This article is about Performance art. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... picture of Isadora Duncan - Source: Library of Congress Modern dance is a dance form developed in the early 20th century. ...

Music
Main article: Music

Music as an academic discipline mainly focuses on two career paths, music performance (focused on the orchestra and the concert hall) and music education (training music teachers). Students learn to play instruments, but also study music theory, musicology, history of music and composition. In the liberal arts tradition, music is also used to broaden skills of non-musicians by teaching skills such as concentration and listening. Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... Music education comprises the application of education methods in teaching music. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Music Theory is a field of study that investigates the nature or mechanics of music. ... Musicology is reasoned discourse concerning music (Greek: μουσικη = music and λογος = word or reason). In other words: the whole body of systematized knowledge about music which results from the application of a scientific method of investigation or research, or of philosophical speculation and rational systematization to the facts, the processes and the... Music is considered to predate language (and certainly predates the written word) by certain historians and is found in every known culture, past and present, varying wildly between times and places. ... Musical composition is: a piece of music the structure of a musical piece the process of creating a new piece of music // A piece of music exists in the form of a written composition in musical notation or as a single acoustic event (a live performance or recorded track). ...

Theater

Theatre or theater (Greek "theatron", θέατρον) is the branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed any one or more elements of the other performing arts. In addition to the standard narrative dialogue style, theatre takes such forms as classical Indian dance, Chinese opera,opera, ballet, mime, kabuki, mummers' plays, and pantomime. Acting is the work of an actor or actress, a person in theatre, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. ... Indian classical dance is a misnomer, and actually refers to Natya, the sacred Hindu musical theatre styles. ... Emperor Xuan-Zong of Tang (left) and his Consort Yang Yuhuan (right) portrayed in a Chinese Opera 19th century Chinese opera Chinese opera costumes Some athletic jump Chinese opera is a popular form of drama in China. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... This article is about Mime as an art form. ... The Kabukiza in Ginza is one of Tokyos leading kabuki theaters. ... For the New Years Day parade in Philadelphia, see Mummers Parade. ... The Christmas Pantomime colour lithograph bookcover, 1890 Pantomime (informally, panto) refers to a theatrical genre, traditionally found in Great Britain, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and Ireland, which is usually performed around the Christmas and New Year holiday season. ...

Dance

Dance (from Old French dancier, perhaps from Frankish) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... Old French was the Romance dialect continuum spoken in territories corresponding roughly to the northern half of modern France and parts of Belgium and Switzerland from around 1000 to 1300 A.D. It was known at the time as the langue doïl to distinguish it from the langue... Old Frankish was the language of the Franks. ... Trinomial name Homo sapiens sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 Humans, or human beings, are bipedal primates belonging to the mammalian species Homo sapiens (Latin: wise man or knowing man) under the family Hominidae (the great apes). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Expression may refer to: (in the vernacular) the act or particular way of expressing something (including an emotion through a facial expression or configuration) (in mathematics) a mathematical expression (in computing) a programming language expression (in computing) a vector graphics software Microsoft Expression (in genetics) the effect produced by a... // The Unobservable Although the term social is a crucial category in social science and often used in public discourse, its meaning is often vague, suggesting that it is a fuzzy concept. ... Spirituality, in a narrow sense, concerns itself with matters of the spirit. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Dance is also used to describe methods of non-verbal communication (see body language) between humans or animals (bee dance, mating dance), motion in inanimate objects (the leaves danced in the wind), and certain musical forms or genres. http://members. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Digimon, the only known animals. ... Honey bees learn and communicate in order to find food sources and for other means. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Leaves are an Icelandic five-piece alternative rock band who came to prominence in 2002 with their debut album, Breathe, drawing comparisons to groups such as Coldplay and Doves. ... Wind, tacuinum sanitatis casanatensis (XIV century) Wind is the rough horizontal movement of air (as opposed to an air current) caused by an area of lo pressure and an area of hi pressure near eachother and the wind will blow from the hi pressure point to the lo pressure point... Dance as a musical form is a smaller musical composition intended for the presentation of dance. ... Allegory of Music on the Opéra Garnier Music is an art form that involves organised sounds and silence. ...


Choreography is the art of making dances, and the person who does this is called a choreographer. Look up Choreography in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Definitions of what constitutes dance are dependent on social, cultural, aesthetic artistic and moral constraints and range from functional movement (such as Folk dance) to codified, virtuoso techniques such as ballet. In sports, gymnastics, figure skating and synchronized swimming are dance disciplines while Martial arts 'kata' are often compared to dances. Young people interacting within an ethnically diverse society. ... Culture (from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate), generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... Aesthetics (or esthetics) (from the Greek word αισθητική) is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty. ... The Mona Lisa Although today the word art usually refers to the visual arts, the concept of what art is has continuously changed over centuries. ... A moral is a one sentence remark made at the end of many childrens stories that expresses the intended meaning, or the moral message, of the tale. ... Folk dancers in Prague Folk dance is a term used to describe a large number of dances, mostly of European origin, that tend to share the following attributes: They were originally danced in about the 19th century or earlier (or are, in any case, not currently copyrighted); Their performance is... A virtuoso (from Italian virtuoso, late Latin virtuosus, Latin virtus meaning: skill, manliness, excellence) is an individual who possesses outstanding technical ability at singing or playing a musical instrument. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance and kinesthetic awareness, such as handsprings, handstands, forward rolls, aerials and tucks. ... Figure skating is an ice skating sporting event where individuals, mixed couples, or groups perform spins, jumps, and other moves on the ice, often to music. ... A hybrid of swimming, gymnastics, and ballet, synchronized swimming involves competitors (either individuals, duets, trios or teams) combining strength, endurance, flexibility, grace and artistry with exceptional breath control while upside down underwater. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Kata (åž‹ or å½¢) (literally: form) is a Japanese word describing detailed patterns of defense-and-attack movements practiced either solo or in pairs. ...


History of Western performing arts

Main article: Western art history
Sophocles, as depicted in the Nordisk familjebok.

Starting in the 6th century BC, the Classical period of performing art began in Greece, ushered in by the tragic poets such as Sophocles. These poets wrote plays which, in some cases, incorporated dance (see Euripides). The Hellenistic period began the widespread use of comedy. // Medieval art Main article: Medieval art Most surviving art from the Medieval period was religious in focus, often funded by the Church, powerful ecclesiastical individuals such as bishops, communal groups such as abbeys, or wealthy secular patrons. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (654x1385, 85 KB) From http://runeberg. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (654x1385, 85 KB) From http://runeberg. ... Sophocles (ancient Greek: ; 495 BC - 406 BC) was the second of three great ancient Greek tragedians. ... The Owl Edition Nordisk familjebok (en. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 6th century BC started on January 1, 600 BC and ended on December 31, 501 BC. // Monument 1, an Olmec colossal head at La Venta The 5th and 6th centuries BC were a time of empires, but more importantly, a time... Classical antiquity is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (7th century BC), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (5th century AD... Sophocles (ancient Greek: ; 495 BC - 406 BC) was the second of three great ancient Greek tragedians. ... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... The term Hellenistic (derived from Héllēn, the Greeks traditional self-described ethnic name) was established by the German historian Johann Gustav Droysen to refer to the spreading of Greek culture over the non-Greek people that were conquered by Alexander the Great. ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke[[ laughter in general). ...


However, by the 6th century AD, Western performing arts had been largely ended, as the Dark Ages began. Between the 9th century and 14th century, performing art in the West was limited to religious historical enactments and morality plays, organized by the Church in celebration of holy days and other important events. This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... Petrarch, who conceived the idea of a European Dark Age. From Cycle of Famous Men and Women, Andrea di Bartolo di Bargillac, c. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was that century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Morality plays are a type of theatrical allegory in which the protagonist is met by personifications of various moral attributes who try to prompt him to choose a Godly life over one of evil. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ...


Renaissance

Main article: Renaissance

In the 15th century performing arts, along with the arts in general, saw a revival as the Renaissance began in Italy and spread throughout Europe plays, some of which incorporated dance were performed and Domenico da Piacenza was credited with the first use of the term ballo (in De Arte Saltandi et Choreas Ducendi) instead of danza (dance) for his baletti or balli which later came to be known as Ballets. The first Ballet per se is considered to be Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx's Ballet Comique de la Royne (1581). Raphael was famous for depicting illustrious figures of the Classical past with the features of his Renaissance contemporaries. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... This article is very long. ... Domenico da Piacenza (1390-1470), was an Italian dancemaster. ... Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... Balthasar de Beaujoyeulx (d. ... Events January 16 - English Parliament outlaws Roman Catholicism April 4 - Francis Drake completes a circumnavigation of the world and is knighted by Elizabeth I. July 26 - The Northern Netherlands proclaim their independence from Spain in the Oath of Abjuration. ...

By the mid-16th century commedia dell'arte became popular in Europe, introducing the use of improvisation. This period also introduced the Elizabethan masque, featuring music, dance and elaborate costumes as well as professional theatrical companies in England. William Shakespeare's plays in the late 16th century developed from this new class of professional performance. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (700x603, 102 KB) Описание Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Performing arts Commedia dellarte Karel Dujardin ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (700x603, 102 KB) Описание Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Performing arts Commedia dellarte Karel Dujardin ... Karel Dujardins set his closely-observed scene of a travelling troupes makeshift stage against idealized ruins in the Roman Campagna: dated 1657 (Louvre Museum) Commedia dellarte (Italian: play of professional artists also interpreted as comedy of humors), also known as Extemporal Comedy, was a popular form of improvisational... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... This article is about the museum: for building history, see Palais du Louvre, for higher education, see École du Louvre. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Karel Dujardins set his closely-observed scene of a travelling troupes makeshift stage against idealized ruins in the Roman Campagna: dated 1657 (Louvre Museum) Commedia dellarte (Italian: play of professional artists also interpreted as comedy of humors), also known as Extemporal Comedy, was a popular form of improvisational... Philosophically, improvisation often focuses on bringing ones personal awareness into the moment, and on developing a profound understanding for the action one is doing. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


In 1597, the first opera, Dafne was performed and throughout the 17th century, opera would rapidly become the entertainment of choice for the aristocracy in most of Europe, and eventually for large numbers of people living in cities and towns throughout Europe. Events 17 January - A court case in Guildford recorded evidence that a certain plot of land was used for playing “kreckett” (i. ... The Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Italy. ... Dafne is the earliest known work that, by modern standards, could be considered an opera. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Ancient Greek term aristocracy originally meant a system of government with rule by the best. The word is derived from two words, aristos meaning the best and kratein to rule. Aristocracies have most often been hereditary plutocracies (see below), where a sense of historical gravitas and noblesse oblige demands...


Modern era

Main article: Modern world

The introduction of the proscenium arch in Italy during the 17th century established the traditional theater form that persists to this day. Meanwhile, in England, the Puritans forbid acting, bringing a halt to performing arts which lasted until 1660. After this period, women began to appear in both French and English plays. The French introduced a formal dance instruction in the late 17th century. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A proscenium arch is a square frame around a raised stage area in traditional theatres. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ...


It is also during this time that the first plays are performed in the American Colonies. Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ...


During the 18th century the introduction of the popular opera buffa brought opera to the masses as an accessible form of performance. Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni are landmarks of the late 18th century opera. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Comic opera is a subcategory of opera, and denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (IPA: , baptized Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart) (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. ... Le nozze di Figaro ossia la folle giornata (Trans: ), K. 492, is an opera buffa (comic opera) composed in 1786 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, Le mariage de Figaro (1784). ... Don Giovanni (K.527) is an opera in two acts with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte. ...


At the turn of the 19th century Beethoven and the Romantic movement ushered in a new era that lead first to the spectacles of grand opera and then to the great musical dramas of Giuseppe Verdi and the Gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art) of the operas of Richard Wagner leading directly to the music of the 20th century. 1820 portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler Beethoven redirects here. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Grand Opera is a style of opera mainly characterized by many features on a grandiose scale. ... Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (either October 9 or 10, 1813 – January 27, 1901) was an Italian Romantic composer, mainly of opera. ... Look up Gesamtkunstwerk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wilhelm Richard Wagner (May 22, 1813 – February 13, 1883) was an influential German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ...


The 19th century was a period of growth for the performing arts for all social classes, the technical introduction of gaslight to theaters in the United States, burlesque (a British import that became popular in the U.S.), minstrel dancing, and variety theater. In ballet, women make great progress in the previously male-dominated art. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ... Photograph of Sally Rand, 1934. ...

Isadora Duncan, one of the developers of free dance.
Isadora Duncan, one of the developers of free dance.

Modern dance began in the late 19th century and early 20th century in response to the restrictions of traditional ballet. Download high resolution version (381x601, 21 KB)Isadora Duncan - Source: Library of Congress This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (381x601, 21 KB)Isadora Duncan - Source: Library of Congress This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Portrait photograph by Arnold Genthe. ... Free dance is a 20th century dance form that preceded Modern dance. ... picture of Isadora Duncan - Source: Library of Congress Modern dance is a dance form developed in the early 20th century. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


Konstantin Stanislavski's "System" revolutionized acting in the early 20th century, and continues to have a major influence on actors of stage and screen to the current day. Both impressionism and modern realism were introduced to the stage during this period. A portrait of Konstantin Stanislavski by Valentin Serov. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Impressionism was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris-based artists, who began exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. ...


With the invention of the motion picture in the late 19th century by Thomas Edison, and the growth of the motion picture industry in Hollywood in the early 20th century, film became a dominant performance medium throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman who developed many devices which greatly influenced life around the world. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... ... The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Darktown Follies and the later cultural growth of the Harlem Renaissance spanned the 1910s to the early 1940s. Rhythm and blues, a cultural phenomenon of black America became a distinctive genera in the early 20th century. The Harlem Renaissance was a flowering of African American art, literature, music and culture in the United States led primarily by the African American community based in Harlem, New York City, after World War I. Literary historians and academics have yet to reach a consensus as to when the period... // Caitlin wants nathans penis mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... Rhythm and blues (aka R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ...


In the 1930s Jean Rosenthal introduced what would be come modern stage lighting, changing the nature of the stage as the Broadway musical became a phenomenon in the United States. George Gershwin and Rodgers & Hammerstein radically re-shaped the medium as the Great depression came to an end and World War II erupted. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Jean Rosenthal (March 16, 1912 - May 1, 1969) is considered a pioneer of theatrical lighting design. ... Classical Spectacular used ordinary stage lighting plus special laser effects In the 2005 Classical Spectacular performance, a state of the art lighting system designed by Durham Marenghi was used to accompany the music Starry lighting such as is shown on the RHS of this photo are much more interesting than... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... George Gershwin (September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer who wrote most of his vocal and theatrical works in collaboration with his elder brother lyricist Ira Gershwin. ... Rodgers and Hammerstein is the songwriting team consisting of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. Rodgers had previously been in a successful partnership with Lorenz Hart (see Rodgers and Hart). ... The Great Depression was a time of economic downturn, which started after the Stock Market Crash on October 29, 1929, also known as Black Tuesday. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Post-War performance

Post-World War II performing arts were highlighted by the resurgence of both ballet and opera in Europe and the United States.

Portrait of Alvin Ailey.
Portrait of Alvin Ailey.

Alvin Ailey's revolutionary American Dance Theater was created in the 1950s, signaling the radical changes that were to come to performing arts in the 1950s and 1960s as new cultural themes bombarded the public consciousness in the United States and abroad. Postmodernism in performing arts dominated the 1960s to large extent. Portrait of Alvin Ailey in 1955 CREDIT: Carl Van Vechten, photographer. ... Portrait of Alvin Ailey in 1955 CREDIT: Carl Van Vechten, photographer. ... Alvin Ailey, Jr. ... Alvin Ailey, Jr. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Postmodernism (sometimes abbreviated as Pomo or PoMo) is a term used in a variety of contexts to describe social conditions, movements in the arts, economic and social conditions and scholarship from the perspective that there is a definable and differentiable period after the modern, or that the 20th century can... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


Rock and roll evolved from rhythm and blues during the 1950s, and became the staple musical form of popular entertainment. Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rhythm and blues (aka R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ...


In 1968, Hair introduced the rock opera. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... The original poster for the show. ... The Whos Tommy, the first album explicitly billed as a rock opera A rock opera or rock musical is a musical production in the form of an opera or a musical in a modern rock and roll style rather than more traditional forms. ...


See also

The performing arts differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face, presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some art object. ... The Apogee Foundation is an international non-profit organization dedicated to the development of human excellence in the performing arts. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... This article is about Performance art. ... Education in the performing arts is a key part of many primary and secondary education curricula and is also available as a specialisation at the tertiary level. ... Copyright ownership in the theatre and performing arts are most debatable in the direction category. ...

References

  • Infoplease: Performing Arts Timeline
  • Performing Arts Trends

  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Copyright Office - Performing Art Works Registration (0 words)
Make sure your work is a performing arts work.
Performing arts works are intended to be “performed” directly before an audience or indirectly “by means of any device or process.” Included are (1) musical works, including any accompanying words; (2) dramatic works, such as scripts, including any accompanying music; (3) pantomimes and choreographic works; and (4) motion pictures and other audiovisual works.
Note: Performing arts registration is not the same as registering a sound recording.
Performing Arts: Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage (946 words)
The first recorded performance in Newfoundland was in 1583 when Sir Humphrey Gilbert travelled to the island to claim it as a British possession.
Performance development from the early 17th century plantation period until the late 18th century remains obscure; then historians began to record, notably in Conception Bay and Bonavista Bay outports, the practice of Christmas mummering.
In addition to theatre, which frequently involves musicians, performance arts have expanded to include a strong presence in contemporary and new dance, the focus of which is often, as it is in theatre, Newfoundland life and experience.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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