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Encyclopedia > Peregrin Took
Character from Tolkien's Legendarium
Name Peregrin Took (Razanur Tûk)
Other names Pippin, Pip, "Ernil i Pheriannath"
Titles Thain of The Shire, Squire to Lord Denethor, Knight of Gondor
Race Hobbit
Culture Hobbit, Shire-hobbit
Date of birth T.A. 2990
Date of death F.A. circa 65
Realm Eriador
Book(s) The Lord of the Rings

Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990–F.A. 70), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's universe of Middle-earth, a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Baggins's youngest but dearest friends. “Tolkien” redirects here. ... Tolkiens Legendarium (ISBN 0-313-30530-7) is a collection of scholarly essays edited by Verlyn Flieger and Carl F. Hostetter on the History of Middle-earth series of books relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ... (In the context of property law, title refers to ownership or documents of ownership; see title (property). ... Thain is a common variant spelling of Thane or Thegn, an Anglo-Saxon term for a minor noble, probably best known for its use in Shakespeares Macbeth. ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... Here is a complete bestiary of the People, Creatures and Mystical Beings of Middle-earth as written about in the mythology of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Eriador (the Lone Lands) is a large region in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional world of Middle-earth. ... This article is about the novel. ... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... For other uses, see Friendship (disambiguation). ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... “Tolkien” redirects here. ... A fantasy world is a type of fictional universe in which magic or other similar powers work. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... “Frodo” redirects here. ...


Peregrin was the only son of Paladin Took II and wife Eglantine Banks, and therefore inherited Paladin's title of Thain of the Shire upon his death in F.A. 13. He had three older sisters, Pearl Took, Pimpernel Took, and Pervinca Took. His best friend Meriadoc Brandybuck was his cousin, son of Paladin's sister Esmeralda Brandybuck. Peregrin Took (T.A. 2990-?), better known to his friends as Pippin, is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth; a Hobbit, and one of Frodo Bagginss youngest but best friends. ... Hobbits are a fictional race in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books. ... Thain is a common variant spelling of Thane or Thegn, an Anglo-Saxon term for a minor noble, probably best known for its use in Shakespeares Macbeth. ... The fields of the Shire in the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy The Shire is a region of J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth, described in The Lord of the Rings and other works. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Took clan was the most famous Hobbit family. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Took clan was the most famous Hobbit family. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Took clan was the most famous Hobbit family. ... Meriadoc Brandybuck, usually referred to as Merry, is a fictional character from J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, featured throughout his most famous work, The Lord of the Rings. ... Hobbits are a fictional race in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books. ...


The hair on his head and his feet (which were exceptionally hairy, even for a Hobbit) was almost all golden and curly. At the beginning of The Fellowship of the Ring he was smaller than the rest of the Hobbits because he was the youngest and because he was a Fallohide hobbit. Fallohides are described as more fleet and light-footed than other strains of hobbit. For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... The Fellowship of the Ring is the first of three volumes of the epic novel The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Fallohides are one of the three races of Hobbits. ...

Contents

Biography

Middle-earth Portal

Pippin was the only hobbit who had not yet reached his 'coming of age' when the Fellowship set out (being eight years younger than Merry, while Frodo himself was 50 years of age) and was therefore still in his 'tweens'. He was a worthy accomplice to Merry's plans, but showed his age as well; he was still a cheerful, if occasionally thoughtless Hobbit, and was first to miss the comforts of Hobbit life. At Rivendell, Pippin was nearly denied the chance to accompany Frodo by Elrond, who seriously considered using the youngest Hobbit as a messenger to the Shire. Gandalf, however, supported his and Merry's claims of friendship and loyalty, and they were chosen as the last members of the Fellowship. Image File history File links Arda. ... Location of Rivendell in Middle-earth marked in red Rivendell (Sindarin: Imladris) is an Elven outpost in Middle-earth, a fictional realm created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Elrond Half-elven is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... For other uses, see Gandalf (disambiguation). ... Spoiler warning: The Fellowship of the Ring, as described in the first volume of The Lord of the Rings, which bears the same name, is a union of 9 representatives from each of the free peoples in Middle-earth, the number chosen to match the 9 Ringwraiths. ...


It was Pippin who inadvertently roused the Balrog in the Mines of Moria, causing Gandalf to exclaim, "fool of a Took", a term that Gandalf often used for Pippin throughout the rest of the books. A Balrog fighting Gandalf, as depicted by Ted Nasmith. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Moria was an ominous name given by the Eldar to what had once been an enormous underground complex in north-western Middle-earth, comprising a vast network of tunnels, chambers, mines and huge halls or mansions, that ran under and ultimately through...


Remaining with the Fellowship until its breaking at Amon Hen, Pippin was captured along with Merry by an Orc-band, which included some of Saruman's evil Uruk-hai. While held captive by the Orcs, he purposefully dropped his elven brooch (a gift from Lórien) as a sign for Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli, who were in pursuit. During a skirmish amongst his captors, Pippin managed to cut his bonds using a sword held fast by a dead Uruk. In the land of Rohan, Pippin and Merry managed to escape when the Orcs were attacked by a company of Rohirrim, the local people. Upon their escape, he and Merry befriended Treebeard, leader of the Ents. They roused the other Ents to fight against Saruman and they attacked his stronghold of Isengard, partially crippling his power. Due to a special "Ent-draught" that Treebeard made him and Merry drink, Pippin and his cousin became the tallest Hobbits ever in history at four and a half feet, surpassing Pippin's ancestor, Bullroarer Took, who was four feet and five inches tall. Amon Hen (Sindarin for Hill of the Eye) is the name of a fictional hill in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... Saruman is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional realm of Middle-earth, the Uruk-hai (Black Speech: Orc folk) were a new breed of Orcs that appeared during the Third Age. ... location of Lórien in Middle-earth marked in red This article is about the Lórien of J. R. R. Tolkiens works. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... For other uses, see Rohan (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Rohan. ... Treebeard or (Sindarin) Fangorn is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... For other uses, see ENT. Ents are a fictional race from J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle_earth legendarium, the Took clan was the most famous Hobbit family. ...


It was Pippin who picked up the palantír of Orthanc after Gríma Wormtongue foolishly threw it as a missile; later, in an almost equally foolish act, Pippin actually stole it out of Gandalf's hands while the wizard slept, putting a rock in its place. Looking into the stone, he had a terrifying encounter with Sauron himself. Because of this, Gandalf separated him from his friends and brought him to the city of Minas Tirith. Meeting Denethor, Steward of Gondor, he volunteered for service to repay him for the death of Denethor's son Boromir, who had died trying to defend Merry and Pippin from the orcs. This amused Denethor, who accepted the Hobbit's offer and made him one of the elite Guards of the Citadel. Later, it was Pippin who rushes to fetch Gandalf when Denethor, driven to despair by seeing in the palantír of Minas Anor a great force seemingly bringing the doom of Gondor, set out to burn his son Faramir and himself alive. A palantír is a magical artifact from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Location of Orthanc and Isengard in Middle-earth marked in red In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Orthanc is the black tower of Isengard. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens novel The Lord of the Rings, Gríma (Wormtongue) is the chief advisor to King Théoden of Rohan. ... For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Steward of Gondor in the time of the War of the Ring. ... The Stewards of Gondor were rulers from J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium of Middle-earth. ... Boromir is a supporting character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... For the First Age tower of the same name, see Minas Tirith (First Age). ... Faramir is also the name of Ondohers son. ...


Pippin was part of the Army of the West led by Aragorn that assaulted the Black Gate in a desperate gambit. During the final parley with the Mouth of Sauron, Gandalf instructed that members of each race that opposed Sauron be present at the parley, including Gimli for Dwarves, Legolas, Elladan and Elrohir (Elrond's twin sons) for Elves, and Pippin for Hobbits. During the last battle before the Morannon, Pippin managed to slay a troll before being knocked unconscious when the dying troll fell on him. Gimli later recognised his Hobbit feet under the troll and dragged him out of the battle, saving his life. After the restoration of the monarchy he was knighted by King Elessar, who then granted him indefinite leave to return home. Later he and Merry were instrumental in overthrowing Saruman's forces during the Scouring of the Shire. The Black Gate or Morannon is a location in J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Mouth of Sauron was the name given to the Dark Lord Saurons servant and emissary. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Dwarves (also known as the Naugrim) are beings of short stature who all possess beards and are often friendly with Hobbits, although long suspicious of Elves. ... Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details about The Lord of the Rings follow. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, an Elf is an individual member of one of the races that inhabit the lands of Arda. ... The Battle of the Morannon or Battle of the Black Gate (Morannon is the Sindarin (Elvish) word for Black Gate) is a fictional battle that took place in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle_earth legendarium. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens world of Middle-earth, Trolls are very large (twelve feet tall or more) humanoids of great strength and poor intellect. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... The Scouring of the Shire is a chapter from the fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...


In F.A. 6 Pippin married Diamond of Long Cleeve, when she was 32 and he was 37. They had one son, Faramir. Faramir Took later married Samwise Gamgee's daughter Goldilocks. The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... Hobbits are a fictional race in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, Samwise Gamgee, later known as Samwise Gardner[2] or Samwise the Brave and commonly known as Sam, is a fictional character who is Frodo Bagginss servant and companion on the journey to Mordor. ...


In the F.A. 13 Pippin inherited his father's title and became 32nd Thain of the Shire, a position he held for 50 years before retiring in F.A. 63 and revisiting Rohan and Gondor with Merry. He remained in Gondor for the rest of his life. The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ...


Pippin died in the year F.A. 70 and his body was set with Merry's in Rath Dínen. The Fourth Age and the later ages that followed it, are time periods from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, described in his fantasy writings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional Middle-earth legendarium, the Rath Dínen (Sindarin for Silent Street) is the pathway between the city of Minas Tirith and Mindolluin in Gondor. ...


Portrayal in adaptations

In Ralph Bakshi's 1978 animated version of The Lord of the Rings, Pippin was voiced by Dominic Guard. In the live-action recordings Bakshi used for rotoscoping, Billy Barty was the model for several of the hobbits, but it is not clear whether Barty modelled for Pippin. Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ... // Events February 1 - Bob Dylans film Renaldo and Clara, a documentary of the Rolling Thunder Revue tour premieres in Los Angeles, California March 1 - Charlie Chaplins coffin is stolen from a Swiss cemetery 3 months after burial March - Leigh Brackett completes the first draft for Star Wars Episode... J.R.R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings is a 1978 animated fantasy film directed by Ralph Bakshi. ... Dominic Guard (b. ... Rotoscoping is a technique where animators trace live action movement, frame by frame, for use in animated films. ... Billy Barty (born William John Bertanzetti) (October 25, 1924–December 23, 2000) was an American film actor. ...


In the 1980 animated version of The Return of the King, made for television, the character was voiced by Sonny Melendrez. The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ... Sonny Melendrez is an American actor. ...


In the 1981 BBC radio serial of The Lord of the Rings, Pippin was played by John McAndrew. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... In 1981 BBC Radio 4 broadcast a dramatisation of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings in 26 half-hour stereo instalments. ... Sean Victor McAndrew - or John as he is known - was born in the small County Mayo town of Bangor Erris on the 8th July 1927. ...


In Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, Pippin is played by Billy Boyd, who is from Scotland. The filmmakers originally planned for Boyd to adopt an English accent for the role, in keeping with the other hobbits; however, Jackson found that Boyd's comic timing was not as keen when he was not using his native accent. For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... The Lord of the Rings film trilogy comprises three live action fantasy epic films; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002) and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). ... Billy Boyd (born 28 August 1968 in Glasgow) is a Scottish actor most widely known for playing Peregrin Took (Pippin), in the film adaptations of The Lord of the Rings (2001-2003) and Barrett Bonden in Peter Weirs film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003). ...


Therefore, it was decided to allow Boyd to play the role with a Scottish accent; the decision was justified by the observation that the Took-land in which the Took clan lived was a very hilly region of the Shire and was therefore vaguely similar to Scotland (indeed, when Saruman's ruffians take over the Shire the terrain of the Took-land proves so rough and inaccessible that the Tooks are effectively able to beat the ruffians back while the surrounding counties are overtaken), as well as the observation that the Tooks invented the game of golf, just like the Scots.[1]


In the film trilogy, the character of Pippin, the youngest of the four hobbit friends, is played by the oldest of the four actors, Billy Boyd. Surprisingly, Frodo, played by Elijah Wood, is the oldest of the hobbits in the book, but Wood is the youngest of the four actors. Elijah Jordan Wood (born January 28, 1981) is an American actor. ...


Pippin was portrayed by Troy Bausch in the Cincinnati stage production of The Return of the King (2003) for Clear Stage Cincinnati. At Chicago's Lifeline Theatre, Pippin was played by John Ferrick in The Two Towers (1999). (See the stage article: The Lord of the Rings) Clear Stage Cincinnati Founded in 2003, Clear Stage Cincinnati is a professional theatre company in Cincinnati, Ohio dedicated to developing and showcasing fresh new theatrical artists by providing them with a Clear Stage for the advancement of their craft. ... Lifeline Theatre was founded in Chicago, Illinois, United States, in 1983 by four Northwestern University graduates. ... This article is about the musicals. ...


See also

In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, the Took clan was the most famous Hobbit family. ...

References

  1. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (2002). in Annotated by Douglas A. Anderson: The Annotated Hobbit. Boston & New York: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-618-13470-0. 

“Tolkien” redirects here. ... Douglas A(llen) Anderson (1959 - ) is an author and editor on the subjects of fantasy and medieval literature, specializing in textual analysis of the works of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... This article is about the book. ... i suck for crack!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Steve Peregrin Took - definition of Steve Peregrin Took in Encyclopedia (930 words)
Steve Peregrin Took was born, Stephen Ross Porter on 28th July 1949 in Eltham, South London.
Steve Took's Horns was not just another of Steve Took's many projects in his gloriously ill-fated (and too often overlooked) solo career, it was also the first band together of Trevor Thoms and Ermanno Ghisio- Erba, or as Inner City Unit (ICU) fans would know them, Judge Trev and Dino Ferari.
Took felt the gig had gone badly, and the years of being dismissed as a ‘drugged-up loser’ by various people particularly those in the Bolan fraternity took their toll.
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