FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Percussion instrument

A percussion instrument is any object which produces a sound by being hit with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. The term usually applies to an object used in a rhythmic context or with musical intent. Percussion may refer to: Percussion instrument Percussion (medicine), a method of clinical examination Percussion cap, a family of firearms Category: ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ...


The word "percussion" has evolved from Latin terms: "percussio" (which translates as "to beat, strike" in the musical sense, rather than the violent action), and "percussus" (which is a noun meaning "a beating"). As a noun in contemporary English it is described at Wiktionary as "the collision of two bodies to produce a sound". The usage of the term is not unique to music but has application in medicine and weaponry, as in percussion cap, but all known and common uses of the word, "percussion", appear to share a similar lineage beginning with the original Latin: "percussus". In a musical context then, the term "percussion instruments" may have been coined originally to describe a family of instruments including drums, rattles, metal plates, or wooden blocks which musicians would beat or strike (as in a collision) to produce sound. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The percussion cap or primer was the crucial invention that enabled firearms to fire in any weather. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ...

Percussion Beaters and sticks
Percussion Beaters and sticks

Contents

History

Ancient Chinese musical bronze bells from the Eastern Zhou Dynasty, c. 6th century BC.
Ancient Chinese musical bronze bells from the Eastern Zhou Dynasty, c. 6th century BC.

Anthropologists and historians often speculate that percussion instruments were the first musical devices ever created. The human voice was probably the first musical instrument, but percussion instruments such as hands and feet, then sticks, rocks, and logs were almost certainly the next steps in the evolution of music. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 763 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1947 × 1530 pixel, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A set of six bronze bells in six graded sizes, from the Chinese Eastern Zhou Dynasty, 6th century BC. These musical bells, along with many other... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 763 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1947 × 1530 pixel, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A set of six bronze bells in six graded sizes, from the Chinese Eastern Zhou Dynasty, 6th century BC. These musical bells, along with many other... This article is about the ancient Chinese dynasty. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ...


The earliest percussion instruments were our hands and feet, then "found" objects such as sticks, logs, and hips. As human communities developed tools for hunting and eventually agriculture, their skill and technology enabled them to craft more complex instruments. For example, a simple log may have been carved to produce louder tones (a log drum) and instruments may have been combined to produce multiple tones (as in a 'set' of log drums). This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... An example of a slit drum from the Philippines known as a kagul by the Maguindanaon people[1] slit drums are percussion instruments, usually made from bamboo, that have parallel slits in one side and one slit across the middle, not always at the center point. ...


Classifications

Percussion instruments can be, and indeed are, classified by various criteria sometimes depending on their construction, ethnic origin, their function within musical theory and orchestration, or their relative prevalence in common knowledge.


Percussion instruments are sometimes classified as being "pitched" or "unpitched." While valid, this classification is widely seen as inadequate. Rather, it may be more informative to describe percussion instruments in regards to one or more of the following four paradigms: In music, pitch is the perception of the frequency of a note. ...


By methods of sound production

Many texts, including Teaching Percussion by Gary Cook of the University of Arizona, begin by studying the physical characteristics of instruments and the methods by which they produce sound. This is perhaps the most scientifically pleasing assignment of nomenclature whereas the other paradigms are more dependent on historical or social circumstances. Based on observation and experiment, one can determine exactly how an instrument produces sound and then assign the instrument to one of the following five categories:


Idiophone

Main article: Idiophone
See also: Category:Idiophones

"Idiophones produce sounds through the vibration of their entire body."[1] Examples of idiophones: An idiophone is any musical instrument which creates sound primarily by way of the instrument vibrating itself, without the use of strings or membranes. ...

A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... French type, four-octave Celesta The Celesta (IPA ) is a struck idiophone operated by a keyboard. ... Tubular bells (also known as chimes) are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Cymbals (band). ... The hi-hat stand has changed little since its invention. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A new Nepalese singing bowl Rin gong at Kiyomizu-dera, Kyoto Singing bowls, also known as Himalayan bowls, cup gongs or (in Japan) rin gongs, are a musical instrument used in Buddhist meditation, dating back many centuries. ... An example of a slit drum from the Philippines known as a kagul by the Maguindanaon people[1] slit drums are percussion instruments, usually made from bamboo, that have parallel slits in one side and one slit across the middle, not always at the center point. ... Classical suspended cymbal A suspended cymbal is any single cymbal played with a stick or beater rather than struck against another cymbal. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A typical vibraphone. ... Wood block Tubular wood block A wood block is essentially a small slit drum made from a single piece of wood and used as a percussion instrument. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ...

Membranophone

Main article: Membranophone
See also: Category:Membranophones

Most objects commonly known as "drums" are membranophones. "Membranophones produce sound when the membrane or head is put into motion." (Cook, 2006) A membranophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by way of a vibrating stretched membrane. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ...


Examples of membranophones:

  • The lion's roar and the cuíca, which are not struck like other drums, produce sound by drawing a string or stick through an opening in the membrane. The lion's roar is sometimes classified as a chordophone, but this is inaccurate because the membrane produces the sound, not the string.
  • Wind machines: A wind machine in this context is not a wind tunnel and therefore not an aerophone. Instead, it is an apparatus (often used in theatre as a sound effect) in which a sheet of canvas (a membrane) is rubbed against a screen or resonator; this action produces a sound which resembles the blowing of wind.

The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ... A tom-tom (not to be confused with a tamtam) is a cylindrical drum with no snare. ... A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... Bongos being played Bongos are a percussion instrument. ... For other uses, see Conga (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Cuíca Cuíca is not a Brazilian friction drum often used in Samba music. ... A chordophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by way of a vibrating string or strings stretched between two points. ... An aerophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by causing a body of air to vibrate, without the use of strings or membranes, and without the vibration of the instrument itself adding considerably to the sound. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Sound effects or audio effects are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of movies, video games, music, or other media. ... A resonator is a device or part that vibrates (or oscillates) with waves. ...

Chordophone

Main article: Chordophone
See also: Category:Chordophones

Most instruments known as "chordophones" are defined as string instruments, but some such as these examples are percussion instruments also. A chordophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by way of a vibrating string or strings stretched between two points. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ...

A diatonic hammered dulcimer made by Masterworks The hammered dulcimer is a stringed musical instrument with the strings stretched over a trapezoidal sounding board. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ...

Aerophone

Main article: Aerophone
See also: Category:Aerophones

Most instruments known as "aerophones" are defined as wind instruments such as a saxophone whereby sound is produced by a person or thing blowing air through the object. However, the following example instruments, if played at all in a musical context, are played by the percussionists in an ensemble. Examples of aerophones: An aerophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by causing a body of air to vibrate, without the use of strings or membranes, and without the vibration of the instrument itself adding considerably to the sound. ... A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ...

A whip being used in a marching band pit ensemble The whip or slapstick is a percussion instrument consisting of two wooden boards joined by a hinge at one end. ... It has been suggested that Fire siren be merged into this article or section. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ... A Browning 9 millimeter Hi-Power Ordnance pistol of the French Navy, 19th century, using a Percussion cap mechanism Derringers were small and easily hidden. ...

Electrophone

Main article: Electrophone

Electrophones are also percussion instruments. In the strictest sense, all electrophones require a loudspeaker (an idiophone or some other means to push air and create sound waves). This, if for no other argument, is sufficient to assign electrophones to the percussion family. Moreover, many composers have used the following example instruments and they are most often performed by percussionists in an ensemble. Examples of electrophones: An electrophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by electrical means. ... An idiophone is any musical instrument which creates sound primarily by way of the instrument vibrating itself, without the use of strings or membranes. ...

This article is about the machine. ... Musical Instrument Digital Interface, or MIDI, is a system designed to transmit information between electronic musical instruments. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... A Zendrum is a hand-crafted MIDI controller, most often used to play drum or percussion parts. ... Léon Theremin playing an early theremin The theremin (originally pronounced but often anglicized as [1]), or thereminvox, is one of the earliest fully electronic musical instruments. ...

By musical function or orchestration

When classifying instruments by function it is useful to note if a percussion instrument makes a definite pitch or indefinite pitch. In music a sound or note of definite pitch is one of which it is possible or relatively easy to discern the pitch or frequency of the fundamental, as opposed to sounds of indefinite pitch. ... In music a sound or note of indefinite pitch is one of which it is impossible or relatively difficult to discern the pitch or frequency of the fundamental, as opposed to sounds of definite pitch. ...


For example, some percussion instruments (such as the marimba and timpani) produce an obvious fundamental pitch and can therefore play melody and serve harmonic functions in music. Other instruments (such as crash cymbals and snare drums) produce sounds with such complex overtones and a wide range of prominent frequencies that no pitch is discernible. The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... For the handheld type of cymbal, see Clash cymbals. ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ...


Definite pitch

Instruments in this group are sometimes referred to as "pitched" or "tuned".


Examples of percussion instruments with definite pitch:

Crotales (upper right) are often used with other mallet percussion Crotales, sometimes called antique cymbals, are percussion instruments consisting of small, tuned bronze or brass disks. ... Glass Harp was a Youngstown, Ohio based power trio consisting of guitarist Phil Keaggy, drummer John Sferra and bassist Dan Pecchio. ... An Armonica. ... Most orchestral glockenspiels are mounted in a case. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Steelpan (also known as Pan or Steel drum, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a Steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad West Indies. ... Tubular bells (also known as chimes) are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... For other uses, see Triangle (disambiguation). ... A typical vibraphone. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ...

Indefinite pitch

Instruments in this group are sometimes referred to as "non-pitched", "unpitched", or "untuned". This phenomenon occurs when the resultant sound of the instrument contains complex frequencies through which no discernible pitch can be heard.


Examples of percussion instruments with indefinite pitch:

A bass drum is a large drum that produces a note of low definite or indefinite pitch. ... Renoirs 1909 painting Dancing girl with castanets Castanets The castanets are a percussion instrument (idiophone), much used in Moorish music, Roma music, Spanish music and Latin American music. ... Claves(pronounces Clar-vays) is a percussion instrument (idiophone), consisting of a pair of short (about 20-30 cm), thick dowels. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Cymbals (band). ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ... This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Whistle (disambiguation). ... For the Beach Boys song, see Wind Chimes. ...

By prevalence in common knowledge

Although it is difficult to define what is "common knowledge", there are instruments in use by percussionists and composers in contemporary music which are certainly not considered by most to be musical instruments of any kind. Therefore, it is worthwhile to try to make distinction between instruments based on their acceptance or consideration by a general audience. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ...


For example, it is safe to argue that most people would not consider an anvil, a brake drum (the circular hub on modern vehicles which houses the brakes), or a fifty-five gallon oil barrel to be musical instruments, yet these objects are used regularly by composers and percussionists of modern music. For other uses, see Anvil (disambiguation). ... A drum brake is a brake in which the friction is caused by a set of shoes or pads that press against the inner surface of a rotating drum. ... Steelpan (also known as Pan or Steel drum, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a Steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad West Indies. ...


One might assign various percussion instruments to one of the following categories:


Conventional or popular

A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... “Buben” redirects here. ... A gong is one of a wide variety of metal percussion instruments. ...

Unconventional

(Sometimes referred to as "found" instruments) A found object, in an artistic sense, indicates the use of an object which has not been designed for an artistic purpose, but which exists for another purpose already. ...

  • spokes on a bicycle wheel
  • brooms
  • a shopping cart
  • metal pipes
  • clay pots
  • garbage cans

John Cage, Harry Partch, Edgard Varèse, and Peter Schickele, all noted composers, created entire pieces of music using unconventional instruments. Beginning in the early 20th century, perhaps with Ionisation by Edgard Varèse which used air-raid sirens (among other things), composers began to require percussionists to invent or "find" objects to produce the desired sounds and textures. By late 20th century, such instruments had become common in modern percussion ensemble music and popular productions, such as the off-Broadway show, Stomp. For the Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... Harry Partch (June 24, 1901 – September 3, 1974) was an American composer. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... Johann Peter Schickele (b. ... Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22, 1883 – November 6, 1965) was a French-born composer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


By cultural significance or tradition

It is not uncommon to discuss percussion instruments in relation to their cultural origin. This has led to a division between instruments which are considered "common" or "modern," and folk instruments which have a significant history or purpose within a geographic region or cultural group.


Folk percussion instruments

Some ethnic percussion instruments
Some ethnic percussion instruments

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x800, 285 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Percussion instrument ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x800, 285 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Percussion instrument ... Three Berimbaus The berimbau is a single-string percussion instrument, a musical bow, from Brazil. ... Bodhr n with tipper The Bodhr n (pronounced bow-rahn; plural bodhr in) is an Irish frame drum ranging in anywhere from 10 to 26 in diameter, with most drums measuring from 14 to 18. The sides of the drum are 3 1/2 to 8 deep. ... Typical bombo legüero made of wood and sheeps skin. ... A caj n (Spanish for crate, drawer, or box, pronounced ka. ... The dhol (Punjabi: ਢੋਲ, ڈھول; Hindustani: ढोल, ڈھول; Armenian: Ô´Õ¸Õ¬) dohol (Persian: ), is a drum (a percussion musical instrument) widely used in India and Pakistan, usually the Punjab region, the Indian/Pakistani province of Punjab, Maharastra and Gujarat. ... The Dholak (sometimes dholaki) is a classical North Indian hand drum. ... A Lenke Wood Djembe From Conakry, Guinea, West Africa A djembe (pronounced JEM-bay) also known as djimbe, jenbe, jembe, yembe, or sanbanyi in Susu; is a skin covered hand drum, shaped like a large goblet, and meant to be played with bare hands. ... Javanese gamelan ensamble with two female sinden (choral singer) during traditional Javanese wedding at Sasono Utomo, Taman Mini Indonesia Indah, Jakarta, Indonesia A gamelan is a kind of musical ensemble of Indonesia typically featuring a variety of instruments such as metallophones, xylophones, drums, and gongs; bamboo flutes, bowed and plucked... Kpanlogo is a type of drum that is associated with kpanlogo music. ... The term Latin percussion refers to any member of a large family of musical percussion instruments used in Latin music, which in turn is a very loosy related group of musical styles, mainly from the Latin American region, and ultimately having roots or influences in African tribal music. ... Marimbula Marímbula (not to be confused with marimba), pronounced as mah-REAM-boo-lah, is a folk musical instrument of Caribbean Islands. ... pogo cello on left with folk band The pogo cello is a percussion instrument. ... Steelpan (also known as steeldrums or pans, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad and Tobago. ... The tabla (Hindi: तब्ला, tablā, Urdu: تبلہ) is a popular Indian percussion instrument used in the classical, popular and religious music of the Indian subcontinent and in Hindustani classical music. ... The Thavil The thavil is a barrel shaped percussion instrument from South India. ... For other uses, see Urumee (disambiguation). ... Udukai is used on Folk Music and prayers in South India. ... A mridangam The mridangam (Tamil: மிருதங்கம்) is a percussion instrument from India, especially South India. ... It has been suggested that Japanese_Taiko_Drumming be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ... A tonbak (also known as tombak, donbak, dombak and zarb, in Persian تمبک) is a goblet drum from Persia (modern Iran). ...

"Common" drums

This category includes instruments which are widely available and popular throughout the world:

A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments, such as a cowbell, wood block, chimes or tambourines, arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... Marching Naval Construction Battalion NMCB-1 (Seabees) 370th Infantry Regiment walking toward the mountains at north of Prato - April 1945 (Gothic Line) Marching refers to the organized, uniformed, steady and rhythmic walking forward, usually associated with military troops. ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ...

Function

Percussion instruments play not only rhythm, but also melody and harmony. For other uses, see Rhythm (disambiguation). ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ...


Percussion is commonly referred to as "the backbone" or "the heartbeat" of a musical ensemble, often working in close collaboration with bass instruments, when present. In jazz and other popular music ensembles, the bassist and the drummer are often referred to as the rhythm section. Most classical pieces written for full orchestra since the time of Haydn and Mozart are orchestrated to place emphasis on the strings, woodwinds, and brass. However, often at least one pair of timpani is included, though they rarely play continuously. Rather, they serve to provide additional accents when needed. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, other percussion instruments (like the triangle or cymbals) have been used, again relatively sparingly in general. The use of percussion instruments became more frequent in the twentieth century classical music. Rhythm section refers to the musicians whose primary jobs in a jazz or popular music band or ensemble is to establish the rhythm of a song or musical piece, often via repeated riffs or ostinati. ... Haydn redirects here. ... “Mozart” redirects here. ... A string instrument (or stringed instrument) is a musical instrument that produces sound by means of vibrating strings. ... A woodwind instrument is a musical instrument in which sound is produced by blowing through a mouthpiece against an edge or by a vibrating reed, and in which the pitch is varied by opening or closing holes in the body of the instrument. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... An old-fashioned triangle, with wand (beater) Angelika Kauffmann: LAllegra, 1779 The triangle is an idiophone type of musical instrument in the percussion family. ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbalum instrument. ...


In almost every style of music, percussion plays a pivotal role. In military marching bands and pipes and drums, it is the beat of the bass drum that keeps the soldiers in step and at a regular speed, and it is the snare that provides that crisp, decisive air to the tune of a regiment. In classic jazz, one almost immediately thinks of the distinctive rhythm of the hi-hats or the ride cymbal when the word "swing" is spoken. In more recent popular music culture, it is almost impossible to name three or four rock, hip-hop, rap, funk or even soul charts or songs that do not have some sort of percussive beat keeping the tune in time. A marching band performs in a parade A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement – usually some type of marching – with their musical performance. ... Pipes and drums are synonymous with pipe band, and both commonly refer to bands comprised of musicians who play the Scottish Highland bagpipes and drums. ... The hi-hat stand has changed little since its invention. ...


Because of the diversity of percussive instruments, it is not uncommon to find large musical ensembles composed entirely of percussion. Rhythm, melody and harmony are all apparent and alive in these musical groups, and in live performance they are quite a sight to see.


Percussion notation

Main article: Percussion notation

Music for pitched percussion instruments can be notated on a staff with the same treble and bass clefs used by many non-percussive instruments. Music for percussive instruments without a definite pitch can be notated with a specialist rhythm or percussion-clef; More often a treble clef (or sometimes a bass clef) is substituted for rhythm clef. Percussion notation is a type of musical notation for percussion instruments. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In musical notation, the staff or stave is a set of five horizontal lines on which note symbols are placed to indicate pitch and time. ... Treble is a term applied in music to the high or acute part of the musical system, as opposed to the bass, the lower or grave part. ... A clef (French for key) is a symbol used in musical notation that assigns notes to lines and spaces on the musical staff. ... For other senses of this word, see clef (disambiguation). ... For other senses of this word, see clef (disambiguation). ...


Names for percussionists

The general term for a musician who plays percussion instruments is "percussionist" but the terms listed below are often used to describe a person's specialties:

The balafon is a pentatonic or heptatonic xylophone of West Africa. ... The balafon is a pentatonic or heptatonic resonated frame xylophone of West Africa. ... Typical bombo legüero made of wood and sheeps skin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bongos being played Bongos are a percussion instrument. ... The cowbell is a percussion instrument. ... A pair of congas The conga is a tall, narrow, single-headed Cuban drum of African origin, probably derived from the Congolese Makuta drums. ... Conga is a drum, a type of music, and a type of dance (Conga Line). ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbalum instrument. ... For the comic book character, see Drummer (comics). ... An extended 4-piece drum kit A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... A hand drum is any type of drum that is typically played by striking it with the bare hand rather than a stick, mallet, hammer, or other type of beater. ... The snare drum or side drum is a tubular drum made of wood or metal with skins, or heads, stretched over the top and bottom openings, and with a set of snares (cords) stretched across the bottom head. ... A modern marimba The marimba is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... The marimba ( ) is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... A pannist is a person who plays the steelpan. ... Steelpan (also known as steeldrums or pans, and sometimes collectively with the musicians as a steelband) is a musical instrument and a form of music originating in Trinidad and Tobago. ... A timbalero is one who plays the percussion instrument timbales, a pair of tonal drums. ... Timbales (or tymbales) are shallow single-headed drums, shallower in shape than single-headed tom-toms, and usually much higher tuned. ... Timpani, or kettledrums, are musical instruments in the percussion family. ... A timpanist in the United States Air Forces in Europe Band. ... A musician who plays the vibraphone, typically in the jazz idiom. ... A typical vibraphone. ... Xylophone in Bali 1937 The xylophone is a musical instrument in the percussion family. ... Kulintang a Kayo, a Philippine xylophone The xylophone (from the Greek meaning wooden sound) is a musical instrument in the percussion family which probably originated in Indonesia. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ...

See also

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Drum (disambiguation). ... A drum beat, a beat on a drum, is any single strike on a single drum, drum machine, or a series of beats on various percussion instruments creating a rhythmic or metric pattern. ... Drum Corps International (DCI), formed in 1972, is the non-profit governing body operating the North American drum and bugle corps circuit for junior corps, whose members are between the ages of 14 and 22. ... This article is about the percussion unit of a marching band. ... An extended 4-piece drum kit A drum kit (or drum set or trap set - the latter an old-fashioned term) is a collection of drums, cymbals and other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a sole percussionist (drummer), usually for jazz, rock, or other types of contemporary music. ... Basic electronic drum set made by Pintech. ... GOCOO are seven female and four male Taiko drummers from Tokyo (Japan) who capture their audience with original grooves woven with Japanese drums, Taikos. ... Hand percussion is a term used to indicate a percussion instrument of any type from any culture that is held in the hand. ... Klopotec from Slovenske Gorice has four wings A klopotec is a wooden mechanical device on a high wooden pole, similar to a windmill. ... The term Latin percussion refers to any member of a large family of musical percussion instruments used in Latin music, which in turn is a very loosy related group of musical styles, mainly from the Latin American region, and ultimately having roots or influences in African tribal music. ... This is a listing of percussion instruments. ... A percussionist is a musician who plays a percussion instrument. ... A history of the Musical Stones of Skiddaw. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Percussion notation is a type of musical notation for percussion instruments. ... The Percussive Arts Society (PAS) is an international music service organization promoting percussion education, research, performance and appreciation. ... The Simon Fraser University Pipe Band, winner of 4 World Pipe Band Championships in the past decade, in competition at the 2005 Bellingham Highland Games A pipe band is a musical ensemble consisting of pipers and drummers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Vocal percussion is the art of creating sounds with ones mouth that approximate, imitate, or otherwise serve the same purpose as a percussion instrument, whether in a group of singers, an instrumental ensemble, or solo. ... Wadaiko Yamato is a Japanese musical group of taiko drummers founded in 1993 by Masa Ogawa. ... It has been suggested that Japanese_Taiko_Drumming be merged into this article or section. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Gary D. Cook, Teaching Percussion, p.2, 3rd edn, 2006, Thomson Schirmer, ISBN 0 534 50990 8

Further reading

  • James Blades, Percussion Instruments and Their History, (1970).
  • Shen, Sinyan , Acoustics of Ancient Chinese Bells, Scientific American, 256, 94 (1987).

James Blades OBE was an English percussionist who died in 1999 at the age of 97. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
percussion instrument - HighBeam Encyclopedia (266 words)
PERCUSSION INSTRUMENT [percussion instrument] any instrument that produces musical sound when its surface is struck with an implement (such as a mallet, stick, or disk) or with the hand.
Among the percussion instruments used in the West are the bell, the celesta, the glockenspiel, the xylophone (and similar marimba), and the Caribbean steel drum.
In general, percussion instruments are not tuned by construction; pitch, tone, and volume depend on the skill of the performer.
Percussion instrument carrier - Patent 4256007 (2279 words)
The combination as defined in claim 4 wherein said carrier comprises a plurality of clamps for suspending said percussion instrument from said carrier in a desired position between said spaced-apart arm members; and tie-down means adpated to be releasably coupled to said arm members for bracing said percussion instrument therebetween.
The present invention comprises a percussion instrument carrier adapted to be worn by a marcher for comfortably maintaining the instrument at a substantially constant position during marching.
In a preferred form of this invention the percussion instrument carrier comprises a rigid supporting frame comprising a pair of spaced-apart loops for engaging the shoulder blades of the marcher and a cooperating, integral portion adapted to contact the back of the marcher for suspending the apparatus from the player's torso.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m