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Encyclopedia > Penzance
Penzance Parish
Penzance
Penwith
Shown within UK and Penwith
OS Grid Reference: SW462269
Lat/Lon: 50°05′N 5°32′W
Population: 21168 (2001 Census)[1]
Dwellings:
Settlements

Arms granted to the municipal borough of Penzance in 1934.
Major Settlement: Penzance
Settlement Type: Town
Population: 10535, [8]Penwith District 2000 estimate
Dwellings:
Secondary Settlements: Newlyn, Heamoor, Chyandour, Gulval
Administration
Ward: Parish divided into five wards: Newlyn and Mousehole; Penzance; Penzance Central; Penzance East, Penzance Promenade and Heamoor and Gulval
District: Penwith
County: Cornwall
Region: South West England
Post Office and Telephone
Post town: Truro
Postcode: TR18 4xx
Dialling Code: 01736
Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air
Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air

Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and is currently Penwith's principal town. Situated in the shelter of Mount's Bay, the town faces southeast onto the English Channel, is bordered to the west by the fishing port of Newlyn and by the civil parish of Ludgvan to the east. The town's location gives it a temperate climate that makes it warmer than most of the rest of Britain. Image File history File links UK_england-PZ.png Summary Created from UK_england. ... Image File history File links Penwith_PZ.png Summary Created from Penwith_numbered. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... Image File history File links Penzancecoat. ... A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... A dwelling is a structure in which humans or other animals live. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... Heamoor (formerly Hea) is a village in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... Chyandour is a small settlement within the boundaries of the parish of Penzance, Cornwall, UK. Historically Chyandour was one for the boudaries of the Borough of Penzance and was the site of large tin smelting works. ... Gulval is a village and civil parish in the district of Penwith, in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... Mousehole Harbour See Mousehole (drilling) for the drilling term Mousehole (pronounced /Mauzl; in Cornish Porthynys) is a fishing village near Newlyn in Cornwall, United Kingdom, reputed to have one of the most beautiful harbours in the country. ... Heamoor (formerly Hea) is a village in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... Gulval is a village and civil parish in the district of Penwith, in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... Local government areas called districts are used, or have been used, in several countries. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South West England is one of the regions of England. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK and Australian postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x555, 449 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance User:Dan1980 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x555, 449 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance User:Dan1980 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Seaport, a painting by Claude Lorrain, 1638 The Port of Wellington at night. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... 1512 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In local government, incorporation occurs when municipalities such as cities, towns, townships, villages, and boroughs become self-governing entities under the laws of the state or province in which they are located. ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ... Mounts Bay, Cornwall Mounts Bay from helicopter Mounts Bay is a large sweeping bay in Cornwall, England stretching from the Lizard Point to the eastern side of the Lands End peninsula. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: La Manche (IPA: ), the sleeve) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering animals not classifiable as insects which breathe in water or pass their lives in water. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... Ludgvan is a village and civil parish in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England. ... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ...

Contents

Etymology

Penzance (Pensans), or "holy headland" in the Cornish language, is a reference to the location of the chapel of St. Anthony that stood over a thousand years ago on the headland to the west of what became Penzance harbour. Until the 1930s this history was also reflected in the choice of symbol for the town, the severed 'holy head' of St. John the Baptist. It can still be seen on the civic regalia of the Mayor of Penzance and on several important landmarks in the town. The only remaining object from this chapel is a carved figure which is now largely eroded known as 'St. Raffidy' which can be found in the church yard of the parish church of Penzance St. Mary's near the original site of the chapel. Saint Anthony may be: Saints Anthony the Great (251-356) Anthony of Padua (also of Lisbon) (1195-1231) Place names United Kingdom: St. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Mural depiction of Jesus baptism by the hand of John, Jordan River, Jordan The excavated remains of the baptism site in Bethany beyond the Jordan John the Baptist (also called John the Baptiser, or Yahya the Baptiser) was a 1st century Jewish preacher and ascetic regarded as a prophet by... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Originally, a landmark literally meant a geographic feature used by explorers and others to find their way back or through an area. ...


History

Bronze and Iron Ages

Evidence of Iron Age settlement can be found in Penzance in a number of sites including Lescudjack Castle, an Iron Age settlement within the current Penzance parish boundaries. Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Lescudjack Hill fort is the name given to the unexcavated Iron Age settlement located in Penzance, Cornwall. ...


Middle Ages

Evidence of historical settlement from this period can be found in the St Clare area of the town, where a chapel not unlike St Anthony's existed dedicated to St. Clare or Cleer. Throughout the period prior to Penzance gaining Borough status in 1614 the village and surrounding areas fell within the control of the Manor of Alverton and was subject to the taxation regime of that manor. Generic plan of a mediaeval manor; open-field strip farming, some enclosures, triennial crop rotation, demesne and manse, common woodland, pasturage and meadow Manorialism or Seigneurialism is the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic... The Manor of Alverton was a former manorial estate located in Penwith, Cornwall, UK. // The first historical details of the manor were described by the Domesday book which stated that prior to the Norman conquest the manor was owned by a Saxon lord known as Alward [1] . Following the the...


Although the first historical mention of Penzance (as a place for landing fish) was in 1322 in local manorial records,[3] the town was, until the 17th century, overshadowed by its near-neighbour Marazion. (Marazion was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1088 and is the oldest chartered town in Britain, having been granted this status by King Henry III in 1257.) In medieval times and later Penzance was subject to frequent raiding by Barbary pirates.[4] The name of one of Penzance's oldest buildings 'The Turk's Head' pub is said to be a reference to these incidents, however there is no written evidence to this effect. Marazion (Cornish: Marghasyow) is a civil parish and town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. It lies on the shores of Mounts Bay, two miles east of Penzance and is served by the Great Western Railway. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was crowned King of England in 1216, despite being less than ten years of age. ... For other meanings, see Barbary Coast (disambiguation). ...


Tudor and Stuart period

Plague

In the summer if 1578 Penzance was visited by the plague. The burial regsiters of Madron (where all Penzance births, deaths and marriages were recorded) shows a massive increase in deaths for the 1578 from 12 the previous year to 155. This is estimated to be about 10% of the population of the then village. The plague also returned in 1647, the registers again show an increase of from 22 burials to 217 in one year. [5]


Spanish raids

Being at the far west of England, Penzance and the surrounding villages have been sacked many times by foreign fleets. On July 23rd 1595,[6] several years after the Spanish Armada of 1588, a Spanish force under Don Carlos de Amesquita, which had been patrolling the channel, landed troops in Cornwall. Amesquita's force seized supplies, raided and burned Penzance and surrounding villages, held a mass, and sailed away before it could be confronted. A detailed description of the Spanish raid of 1595 can be found here. For the navy of Spain, see Spanish Navy. ... Don (usually preceded in English by the), derived from Latin Dominus, is a Spanish (pron. ... Carlos de Amésquita (also Carlos de Amézola) was a Spanish naval officer from 16th century. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ...


Penzance as a town since 1614

The reason for Penzance's relative success probably stems from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries when Henry IV of England granted the town a Royal Market.[7] Henry VIII later granted the right to charge harbour dues,[8] and King James I granted it the status of a borough. // Birth and life before accession - relationship with Richard II - exile - return and usurpation Henry IV (April 3, 1367 – March 20, 1413) was born at Bolingbroke Castle in Lincolnshire, hence the other name by which he was known, Henry of Bolingbroke. His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest... Silver groat of Henry VIII, minted ca. ... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland. ...


During the English Civil War Penzance was sacked by the forces of Sir Thomas Fairfax apparently for the kindness shown to Lord Goring and Lord Hopton s troops during the conflict[9] The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... ... George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich (1583? - 1663), English soldier, was the son of George Goring of Hurstpierpoint and Ovingdean, Sussex, and of Anne Denny, sister of Edward Denny, earl of Norwich. ... Ralph Hopton, 1st Baron Hopton (1598 – September, 1652) was a Royalist commander in the English Civil War. ...


Penzance borough council undertook several major projects, including the building of the Market House (which was the home of the corn exchange and the then guildhall), and the harbour, the first pier of which was built in 1512[10]. The southern arm of the pier was built in 1766 and extended in 1785[11].


Civil improvements in this period included the construction in 1759 of a reservoir which supplied water to public pumps in the streets.[12]


Penzance has a long standing association with the local parish of Madron. Madron church was in fact the centre of most religious activity in the town until 1871[13], when the church of St. Mary (prior to this period a Chapel of ease) was granted parish status by church authorities. Madron is a village in West Cornwall, Britain in the district of Penwith situated outside of the modern parish boundary of the town of Penzance. ... A chapel of ease is a church building other than the main church of a parish which is more accessible to some parishoners than the main church. ...


In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake caused a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose eight feet in ten minutes at Penzance, ebbed at the same rate, and continued to rise and fall for 5 hours. [14] Copper engraving of the Lisbon earthquake 1755 The 1755 Lisbon earthquake took place on November 1, 1755 at 9:20 in the morning. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ...


Nineteenth century

At the start of the nineteenth century (1801), the town had a population of 2,248. The census, which is taken every ten years, recorded a peak population in 1861 of 3,843, but it then declined, as in most of Cornwall, through the remainder of the century, being just 3,088 in 1901.[15]


By the time Queen Victoria came to the throne, Penzance had established itself as an important regional centre. The Royal Geological Society of Cornwall was founded in the town in 1814[16] and about 1817 was responsible for introducing a miner's safety tamping bar, which attracted the Prince Regent to become its patron. Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ...


The pier had been extended again in 1812 and John Matthews opened a small dry dock in 1814, the first in the South West. In 1840 Nicholas Holman of St Just opened a branch of his foundry business on the quayside[17]. These facilities proved valuable in supporting the steamships that were soon calling at the harbour in increasing numbers. St Just (Cornish: Lannyust) is a town in Cornwall. ...


Gas lighting was introduced in 1830 and the old Market House was demolished in 1836. Its replacement, designed by W Harris of Bristol, was completed at the top of Market Jew Street in 1838. The church of St Mary's, another prominent feature of the Penzance skyline, was completed in 1836, while a Roman Catholic church was built in 1843. Another familiar building from this period is the eccentric Egyptian House in Chapel Street, built in 1830. The first part of the Promenade along the sea front dates from 1844.


After the passing of the Public Health Act (1848), Penzance was one of the first towns to petition to form a local board of health, doing so in September that year. Following a report by a government inspector in February, the Board was established in 1849 which led to many facilities to enhance public health. The report[18] shows that most streets were Macadamised or sometimes paved, and the town was lit by 121 gas lamps from October to March each year, although they were not lit when there was a full moon. Water was supplied from 6 public pumps, and there were a further 53 private wells. There were no sewage pipes at the time, waste being collected from the main streets by a refuse cart. Local Boards or Local Boards of Health were local authorities in urban areas of England and Wales from 1848 to 1894. ... Local Boards or Local Boards of Health were local authorities in urban areas of England and Wales from 1848 to 1894. ... Macadam is a type of road construction pioneered by John Loudon McAdam in the early 1800s. ...


Penzance railway station, the terminus of the West Cornwall Railway, opened on 11 March 1852[19] on the eastern side of the harbour, although trains only ran to Redruth at first. From 25 August 1852 the line was extended to Truro, but the Cornwall Railway linking that place with Plymouth was not opened until 4 May 1859. Passengers and goods had to change trains at Truro as the West Cornwall had been built using the 4 ft 8½ in (1435 mm) standard gauge, but the Cornwall Railway was built to the 7 ft 0¼ in (2140 mm) broad gauge. The West Cornwall Railway Act included a clause that it would be converted to broad gauge once it had been connected to another broad gauge line, but the company could not raise the funds to do so. Penzance Station serves the town of Penzance, Cornwall, UK. The station is the terminus of the Great Western Main Line from London though the Westcountry. ... Was a former Railway Company operating in West Cornwall, UK. The company was formed in 1844 to opererate the existing service between the towns of Hayle and Redruth and the extend the railway line as far as Penzance. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in leap years). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Map sources for Redruth at grid reference SW700420 Redruth (Cornish: Rysrudh) is a town in the south-west of Cornwall, Britain. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Truro (pronounced ; Cornish: Truru) is a city in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... The Cornwall Railway was a broad gauge railway (7 feet 0. ... Plymouth is a city in the southwest of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 1859 (MDCCCLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... Great Western Railway broad gauge steam locomotives awaiting scrapping in 1892 after the conversion to standard gauge. ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ...


The line was sold to the Great Western Railway and its "Associated Companies" (the Bristol and Exeter Railway and South Devon Railway) on 1 January 1866. The new owners quickly converted the line to mixed gauge using three rails so that both broad and "narrow" trains could operate. Broad gauge goods trains started running in November that year, with through passenger trains running to London from 1 March 1867[20]. The last broad gauge train arrived at 8.49pm on 20 May 1892, having left London Paddington station at 10.15 that morning. The two locomotives, numbers 1256 and 3557, took the carriages away to Swindon railway works at 9.57, and all trains since have been standard gauge[21]. The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... William Spreats print shows the original St Davids station, built by the Hoopers in Pennyroyal Fields in 1844. ... The South Devon Railway Company built and operated the railway from Exeter to Plymouth and Torquay in Devon, England. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Sunlight reflects off dual-gauge tracks near Chur, Switzerland Mixed-gauge track and pointwork (1435 mm and 1067 mm) at Odawara in Japan Dual-gauge or mixed-gauge railway is a special configuration of railway track, allowing trains of different gauges to use the same alignment. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... May 20 is the 140th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (141st in leap years). ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... The 1076 Class were 266 double-framed 0-6-0 tank locomotives built by the Great Western Railway between 1870 and 1881; the last one was withdrawn in 1946. ... The 3521 Class were forty tank locomotives designed by William Dean to haul passenger trains on the Great Western Railway. ... Swindon railway works was built by the Great Western Railway in 1840 in the town of Swindon in the English county of Wiltshire. ...


The ability of the railway to carry fresh produce to distant markets such as Bristol, London and Manchester enabled local farmers and fishermen to sell more produce and at better prices. The special "perishable" train soon became a feature of the railway, these being fast extra goods trains carrying potatoes, broccoli or fish depending on the season. In August 1861 1,787 tons of potatoes, 867 tons of broccoli, and 1,063 tons of fish were dispatched from the station[22]. Fruit and flowers were also carried, the mild climate around Penzance and on the Scilly Isles meant that they were ready for market earlier and could command high prices. Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, North West England. ... Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, commonly grown for its starchy tuber. ... Broccoli is a plant of the Cabbage family, Brassicaceae (formerly Cruciferae). ... The Isles of Scilly (Cornish: Ynysek Syllan) are an archipelago of islands off the Cornish coast. ...


The completion of the railway through Cornwall made it easier for tourists and invalids to enjoy the mild climate of Penzance. Bathing machines had been advertised for hire on the beach as early as 1823[23], and the town was already "noted for the pleasantness of its situation, the salubrity of its air, and the beauty of its natives".[24] The first town's first official guide book was published in 1860 and the Queens Hotel opened on the sea front the following year. It was so successful that it was extended in 1871 and 1908.


At the same time as the railway was being built more improvements were being made to the harbour, with a second pier on the eastern side of the harbour, the Albert Pier, completed in 1853 to provide even better shelter for shipping[25], and a lighthouse built on the Old Pier in 1855. The Scilly Isles Steam Navigation Company was founded in 1858 and placed in service the first steam ship on the route, SS Little Western. In 1870 the new West Cornwall Steam Ship Company joined the route, taking over the Scilly Isles company the following year[26]. The Peggys Point lighthouse in Nova Scotia, Canada An aid for navigation and pilotage at sea, a lighthouse is a tower building or framework sending out light from a system of lamps and lenses or, in older times, from a fire. ...


Penzance, with its dry dock and engineering facilities, was chosen as the western depot for Trinity House that serviced all the lighthouses and lightships from Start Point to Trevose Head. It was opened in 1866 adjacent to the harbour and the Buoy Store became the Trinity House National Lighthouse museum until 2005 when Trinity House closed the museum. The Corporation of Trinity House - came into being in 1514 by Royal Charter granted by Henry VIII. Flag of Trinity House Trinity House has three main functions: The care of all lighthouses in England, Wales, the Channel Islands and Gibraltar. ... Concept image of a solar sail spacecraft in the process of unfurling sails. ... Categories: Stub ... A sea lion on navigational buoy #14 in San Diego Harbor Green can #11 near the mouth of the Saugatuck river. ...

Inside the new station
Inside the new station

In 1875 a local newspaper described the railway station as a large dog's house of the nastiest and draughtiest kind[22] but a series of works improved this part of the town during the 1880s. The original station was rebuilt with the present buildings and train shed over the platforms (1880). The lower end of Market Jew Street was widened and a new road was built to link the station with the harbour over the Ross swing bridge (1881), allowing the construction of proper sewers beneath. A larger dry dock replaced Matthews' original facility (1880), and a floating harbour was made (1884) with lock gates to keep in the water at low tide. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (803x501, 97 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance Penzance railway station ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (803x501, 97 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance Penzance railway station ... A train shed is a adjecent building to a railway station where the tracks and platforms are covered by a overall roof. ... A swing bridge is a bridge that has as its primary structural support a vertical locating pin and support ring at or near to its center, about which it can then pivot horizontally as shown in the animated illustration below. ... Canal locks in England. ...


Around the headland, public baths were opened on the Promenade in 1887 and the Morrab Gardens with its sub-tropical plants was opened two years later. A bandstand was added to the gardens in 1897.[22]


Twentieth century

Penzance Harbour
Penzance Harbour

In 1901 the town had a population of 3,088 The census taken every ten years recorded a continuing decline in populationin until 1921, when just 2,616 people were recorded, after which it climbed rapidly to 4,888 (1931) then 5,545 (1951) - the population had more than doubled in twenty years and was now larger than at any time in the past.[27] (The census boundaries changed in 1981 so these figures do not directly compare with those stated for the current population) Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x633, 147 KB)Mark Twyning Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x633, 147 KB)Mark Twyning Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...


A proposed electric tramway along the Promenade to Newlyn, which would then have continued as a light railway to St Just, failed to gain authorisation in 1898, instead motor buses were put into service on 31 October 1903.[28] These linked Penzance with Marazion and were operated by the Great Western Railway, being introduced only 11 weeks after the railway's pioneering service between Helston and The Lizard. They were considered a success, carrying 16,091 passengers by the end of the year, so were followed the next spring by further routes to Lands End and St Just. These services developed into the First Devon and Cornwall bus network that stills serves the area and is still centred on a terminus alongside Penzance railway station. A CLRV Streetcar in the City of Toronto. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... A Light rail system Historically, a railway built in Britain under the 1896 Light Railways Act This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... St Just (Cornish: Lannyust) is a town in Cornwall. ... An articulated bus operated by the CTA in Chicago, Illinois, USA. A Go North East Bus parked in a lay-by in Tyne and Wear, England A bus is a large road vehicle intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver and sometimes a conductor. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Marazion (Cornish: Marghasyow) is a civil parish and town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. It lies on the shores of Mounts Bay, two miles east of Penzance and is served by the Great Western Railway. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... Helston (Cornish: Hellys or Henlys) is a small town and civil parish in the Kerrier district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, at the northern end of the Lizard Peninsula. ... Lizard Point The Lizard is a peninsula of Cornwall, United Kingdom, and contains the most southerly point of the island Great Britain, Lizard Point. ... For the clothing retailer, see Lands End. ... First Devon and Cornwall is a subsidiary of First Group which operates public transport throughout the UK. As the name suggests, the company operate bus services within Devon and Cornwall following the takeovers of Western National (in Cornwall and South Devon) and Red Bus (in North Devon). ... Penzance Station serves the town of Penzance, Cornwall, UK. The station is the terminus of the Great Western Main Line from London though the Westcountry. ...


The dry dock was sold on 25 August 1904 to N Holman and Sons Limited, the engineering business that had been trading in Penzance since 1840. New workshops were built during the 1930s and the facility continued to provide facilities for the Scilly ferries and other merchant ships, as well as Trinity House, the Royal Navy and Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service. In 1951 a new vessel for the King Harry Ferry on the River Fal was launched, built on the keel of an old landing craft. In 1963 they even built a steam tug, the Primrose.[29] August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the oldest of the British armed services (and is therefore the Senior Service). ... Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service ensign The Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service is a British Government agency which runs a variety of small support vessels for the Royal Navy. ... The King Harry Ferry is a vehicular chain ferry which crosses the River Fal in the English county of Cornwall. ... The River Fal flows through Cornwall, the United Kingdom, rising near Truro and reaching the English Channel at Falmouth. ... Landing craft Rapière LCU 1656 departs USS Bataan (LHD-5) well deck during Hurricane Katrina relief operations. ...


Land was reclaimed beside the Albert Pier in the 1930s to allow the railway station to be further enlarged at a cost of £134,000[22]. The 1880 building was retained but extra platforms and sidings were provided to enable it to handle more perishable goods, and also the increasing numbers of tourists travelling to the area.


In 1905 a new bandstand had been built on the Promenade opposite the Queens Hotel, and the Pavilion Theatre opened nearby in 1911, complete with a roof garden and cafe.[30] Travel to Penzance was easier than ever, with the Great Western Railway introducing the Cornish Riviera Express on 1 July 1904, which left London Paddington at 10:10 and arrived in Penzance just 7 hours later, two hours faster than the previous quickest service[31]. (In 2007 it leaves Paddington at 10:05 and takes 5 hours and 5 minutes.) The railway actively promoted local tourism with the production of postcards that were sold at its stations, and the annual publication of a guide book, The Cornish Riviera, in which SPB Mais described it as "a suburb of Covent Garden, and a great fishing centre ... there is always something going on in its harbour".[32] 4038 Queen Berengaria running near Acton with the London-bound Cornish Riviera Express The Cornish Riviera Express is an English express passenger train that has run from London to Penzance in Cornwall since 1904. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... 4038 Queen Berengaria running near Acton with the London-bound Cornish Riviera Express The Cornish Riviera Express is an English express passenger train that has run from London to Penzance in Cornwall since 1904. ... Stuart Petre Brodie Mais (1885 - 1975) was an English writer and broadcaster, best remembered for his travel books, many of which were commissioned by railway companies. ...


1923 had seen a new road link the harbour area and the Promenade, and in 1933 the St Anthony Gardens were built, followed two years later by the Jubilee Bathing Pool opposite. Tourists could now make full use of the whole sea front between Penzance and Newlyn harbours.


Transport

Penzance is located approximately 5 miles (8 kilometres) from the end of the A30 road and 286 miles (460 km) or 6 hours[33] by car from London. The A30 is an old trunk road (main road) which runs from central London right down to Lands End, the westernmost point of the mainland of England (though not of mainland Great Britain, see Corrachadh Mor), and is sometimes called the Great South West Road. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ...


Penzance railway station is situated at the bottom of Market Jew Street and close to the harbour. It is the western terminus of the Great Western Main Line which runs above the beach to Marazion, affording passengers good views of St Michaels Mount and Mounts Bay. Most services[34] are operated by First Great Western, both local services to St Erth, St Ives, Hayle, Camborne, Redruth, and Truro, and direct trains linking Penzance with Plymouth, Exeter St Davids, Bristol Temple Meads, Reading and London Paddington. The Night Riviera train offers an overnight sleeping car service to and from Reading and London. Journey time to Plymouth is typically under 2 hours; to Bristol around 4 hours, and London less than 5½ hours. Penzance Station serves the town of Penzance, Cornwall, UK. The station is the terminus of the Great Western Main Line from London though the Westcountry. ... Categories: Rail stubs | British railway lines ... First Great Western is the operating name of First Greater Western Ltd,[1] a British train operating company owned by First Group, which operates services in the west and south west of England and South Wales. ... St Erth Station serves the village of St Erth, Cornwall, UK. The station is about 3/4 from the village. ... St Ives railway station serves the busy coastal town of St. ... Looking east Hayle Station serves the town of Hayle, Cornwall, UK. Acess between the platforms is via a barrow crossing, which is unusual for a mainline with express services not stopping at the station. ... Camborne station in 2005, wrapped in scaffolding Camborne Station serves the town of Camborne, Cornwall, UK. The station is operated by Wessex Trains as is every other station in Cornwall. ... Redruth Station serves the town of Redruth, Cornwall, UK. The station is operated by Wessex Trains as is every other station in Cornwall. ... The main entrance to the station Truro Station serves the city of Truro, Cornwall, UK. It is the junction for the Maritime Line to Falmouth. ... Plymouth station Plymouth railway station serves the city of Plymouth, Devon, UK. It is the largest of the six railway stations in the city, and the only one served by Intercity trains. ... Exeter St Davids station is the most important of seven National Rail stations in the city of Exeter in southwest England. ... Bristol Temple Meads railway station is a major rail transport hub in Bristol, England. ... Reading station from the station car park at the north (rear) side of the station Reading (formerly Reading General) is a railway station in the large town of Reading in south central England. ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... The Night Riviera is a sleeper train service operated by First Great Western. ... The interior of a Pullman car on the Chicago and Alton Railroad circa 1900. ...


Virgin Trains run a small number of services (departing in the morning, returning in the evening) via Bristol and Birmingham New Street to Glasgow Central via Preston and Carlisle, also to Dundee via Leeds, York, Newcastle and Edinburgh Waverley. The journey time to Birmingham is just under 5½ hours, and nearly 10 hours to Glasgow. Virgin Trains is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... The tracks at the eastern end of Birmingham New Street station Class 390 no. ... Glasgow Central Station is the larger of the two present main-line railway terminals in Glasgow, Scotland, and is managed by Network Rail. ... Preston Railway Station in Preston, Lancashire is on the West Coast Main Line. ... Carlisles Citadel railway station Carlisle railway station, also known as the Citadel station, serves the Cumbrian town of Carlisle. ... Dundee Railway Station serves the small city of Dundee on the East coast of Scotland. ... Leeds City station is the mainline railway station serving the city of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. ... The approach to York station and the Royal York hotel York railway station is a main-line railway station in the historic city of York. ... Newcastle railway station may refer to: Newcastle Central station, the main railway station in the city of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom Newcastle railway station, New South Wales, the main railway station in the city of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. ... Waverley Station is the main railway station in the Scottish capital Edinburgh. ...


The bus and coach station is adjacent to the railway station from where National Express operates coach services to London Victoria (taking around 9 hours) via Heathrow Airport. Local bus services run by First Devon and Cornwall connect Penzance with most major settlements in Cornwall, including Truro, St Ives, St Just, St Buryan, Lands End, and also Plymouth in Devon. National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ... Victoria Station concourse Victoria station is a London Underground and railway station in London, in the City of Westminster. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to as Heathrow, is one of the busiest airports in the world. ... First Devon and Cornwall is a subsidiary of First Group which operates public transport throughout the UK. As the name suggests, the company operate bus services within Devon and Cornwall following the takeovers of Western National (in Cornwall and South Devon) and Red Bus (in North Devon). ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... Truro (pronounced ; Cornish: Truru) is a city in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... St Ives harbour and the local rescue lifeboat. ... St Just (Cornish: Lannyust) is a town in Cornwall. ... St Buryan is a village and civil parish in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England. ... For the clothing retailer, see Lands End. ... Plymouth is a city in the southwest of England, or alternatively the Westcountry, and is situated within the traditional county of Devon. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ...

Sikorsky S-61N Echo Bravo departing Penzance Heliport for the Isles of Scilly during August 2006
Sikorsky S-61N Echo Bravo departing Penzance Heliport for the Isles of Scilly during August 2006

A ferry service is operated between Penzance harbour and the Isles of Scilly by The Scillonian III, carrying both foot-passengers and cargo. Sailing time is approximately 2 hours and 40 minutes. Alternatively, a passenger helicopter service operates from Penzance Heliport to the Isles of Scilly[35] run by British International Helicopters. Flying time is approximately 20 minutes. A bus service run by the Skybus Airline service connects with Land's End Airport for fixed wing flights (15 minutes) to the Isles of Scilly. This service operates from the railway station, near the taxi rank, rather than the bus station. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 693 KB) Author: Dave Taskis (me). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1840x1232, 693 KB) Author: Dave Taskis (me). ... For the original Viking use of the name, see Sea-King. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly For the area of Surrey, see Scilly Isles, Surrey. ... Scillonian III, as seen from the air, halfway between St Marys and Penzance Scillonian III is a passenger ship based at Penzance in Cornwall, England run by the Isles of Scilly Steamship Company. ... The Bell 206 of Canadian Helicopters Robinson Helicopter Company (USA) R44, a four seat development of the R22 A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors consisting of two or more rotor blades. ... Penzance Heliport (IATA: PZE, ICAO: EGHK) is located 0. ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly For the area of Surrey, see Scilly Isles, Surrey. ... British International Helicopters is an airline based at Penzance heliport, in Cornwall, England. ... Lands End Airport (IATA: LEQ, ICAO: EGHC), situated in St Just, Cornwall, is the most south westerly airport of mainland England. ... Taxicab, short forms taxi or cab, is a type of public transport for a single passenger, or small group of passengers, typically for a non-shared ride. ...


Newquay Airport[36] is 41 miles (66 km) away and offers flights to Gatwick and Stansted airports. Plymouth Airport[37] is 77 miles (124 km) away has services to Gatwick, Bristol, Dublin and Manchester airports. Newquay Cornwall International Airport (IATA: NQY, ICAO: EGDG) is a commercial airport located a few kilometers northeast of Newquay in England. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... Stansted Airport (IATA: STN, ICAO: EGSS) is a large passenger airport with a single runway and hub for a number of major European low-cost airlines. ... Plymouth City Airport is an airport in the City of Plymouth, Devon, in England. ... Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol in England, and the surrounding area. ... Dublin Airport, or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW) is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Manchester Airport (IATA: MAN, ICAO: EGCC) is a major airport in Manchester, England. ...

Politics and government

 Common seal of the borough of Penzance, used in lieu of a coat of arms 1614 - 1934 now the Mayoral Seal
Common seal of the borough of Penzance, used in lieu of a coat of arms 1614 - 1934 now the Mayoral Seal

Until 1934 the borough of Penzance referred only to the town, but has since been extended to include the nearby settlements of Newlyn, Mousehole, Gulval and Heamoor. The Civil parish of Penzance was further extended in 2004 under District of Penwith (Electoral Changes) Order 2002[38] to include Eastern Green, formerly part of the Ludgvan civil parish area. Image File history File links Old_Pzarms. ... Image File history File links Old_Pzarms. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... Seal on envelope A seal is an impression printed on, embossed upon, or affixed to a document (or any other object) in order to authenticate it, in lieu of or in addition to a signature. ... A borough is an administrative division used in various countries. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... Mousehole Harbour See Mousehole (drilling) for the drilling term Mousehole (pronounced /Mauzl; in Cornish Porthynys) is a fishing village near Newlyn in Cornwall, United Kingdom, reputed to have one of the most beautiful harbours in the country. ... Gulval is a village and civil parish in the district of Penwith, in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... Heamoor (formerly Hea) is a village in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... Ludgvan is a village and civil parish in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England. ...


In 1974 the Penzance borough was abolished and replaced, first by the Penzance Charter Trustees and then from 1980 by Penzance Town Council. The principal local authorities in the area are now Penwith District Council and Cornwall County Council. For the purposes of election to the Cornwall County Council, Penzance returns 3 councillors to the Penzance Electoral Division. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... In the United Kingdom, Charter Trustees are set up to maintain the continuity of a town charter or city charter after a district with the status of a borough or city has been abolished, until such time as a parish council is established. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... In the United Kingdom, town councils are civil parish councils, where the civil parish is a town. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ... Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ...


Penzance Town Council does not have in place a system of political registration so councillors do not form groups of any kind and technically act independently, however the current political composition of the council (as of 3 November 2006) is as follows: independent 10, Liberal Democrats 6, Mebyon Kernow 4. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Penzance also elects a mayor every year in May from the members of Penzance town council. Although mayors have a political affiliation this position is largely ceremonial. Penzance Borough Arms 1614 - 1934 now used on the Civic Regalia of the Mayor of Penzance The office of Mayor of Penzance was established under Penzance Charter of incorporation of 1614 granted by James I. This charter allowed for the appointment of 12 assistants and 8 Alderman to govern the...


Economy

The economy of Penzance has like many Cornish communities suffered from the decline of the traditional Cornish industries of fishing, mining and agriculture. Penzance now has a mixed economy consisting of light industrial, tourism and retail businesses. However, like the rest of Cornwall, housing remains comparatively expensive, wages low and unemployment high within the parish area. House prices have risen 274% in 10 years the fastest rise in the UK [39]. The fishing port of Newlyn, which falls within the parish boundaries, provides some employment in the area, but has also been greatly affected by the decline in the fishing industry over the last 30 years. In the 2004 index of deprivation Penzance is listed as having 3 wards within the top 10% percent for employement deprivation, Penzance East (125th most deprived in England) Penzance West (200th most deprived in England), Penzance Central (712th most deprived in England)[40] 18-31% of households in the parish being described as "poor households"[41]. The Penzance East Ward also has one the highest umemployement rates in Cornwall stated as 15.4% [41]. Cornwall (Cornish: Kernow) is a county in South West England, United Kingdom, on the peninsula that lies to the west of the River Tamar. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ...


Mining

Following Sir Humphry Davy’s contribution to the mining industry, The Miners' Association began mining classes in Penzance. As mining in the area became more complex the Penzance Mining and Science School was founded in 1890. The school continued to teach mining until 1910 when it was amalgamated with Camborne and Redruth Mining School forming the School Of Metallipherous Mining in Camborne, which is now known as the Camborne School of Mines. This institution has now moved to the Combined Universities in Cornwall campus at Tremough, Falmouth. Penzance from 1663[42] was a coinage town, responsible for the collection of tin taxation on behalf of the Duchy of Cornwall it held this status for 176 years.[43] According to William Pryce in his 1778 book Mineralogia Cornubiensis Penzance coined more tin than the towns of Liskeard, Lostwithiel, and Helston put together. Penzance also had its own sub-marine mine situated off the coast of the town next to the area known as Wherrytown. The mine known as 'Wheal' Wherry was worked from the period 1778 to 1798 and again from 1836 to 1840 [44]. Founded by "a poor 57 year old miner" named Thomas Curtis, the mine was said to be "very rich at depth" and was connected to the shore by a wooden bridge; the ore being transported by Wherry boat. The mine suffered considerable damage in 1798 when an American ship broke anchor off nearby Newlyn and smashed into the bridge and head gear. Later attempts at mining were not as profitable.[45] During the 19th century and until 1912, Penzance had the largest tin smelting house in Cornwall, operated by the Bolitho family. The smelting works were situated at Chyandour[46]. As a consequence of this concentration of mining wealth Penzance also became a centre for commercial banking. The Bolitho bank (now part of Barclays Bank)[47] and the Penzance Bank were two of the largest, although the latter collapsed in 1896. Humphry Davy Sir Humphry Davy (December 17, 1778 - May 29, 1829), often incorrectly spelled Humphrey, was an Cornish chemist. ... The Miners Association was founded in 1858 by Robert Hunt FRS, and the Royal Cornwall Polytechnic Society. ... This article is about mineral extraction. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Camborne Mining School 1888-1970 the School Of Metallipherous Mining was formed by the amalgamation of all the mining schools in the county of Cornwall, England, UK in 1910 . ... The Camborne School of Mines commonly abbreviated to CSM, is a specialist department of the University of Exeter. ... The Combined Universities in Cornwall is a centre of higher education located at the site of an abandoned girls convent, in Tremough, Cornwall, England. ... Map sources for Tremough at grid reference SW775345 Tremough is a suburb of Falmouth in Cornwall, England. ... Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ... A stannary town is, historically, the adminstrative centre of a tin-mining district, from where the sale and export of the mined tin was arranged. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Liskeard, an ancient Stannary and market town at the head of the River Looe valley in southeast Cornwall, UK, is the administrative centre of the Caradon District. ... Lostwithiel is a small town in Cornwall, England at the head of the estuary of the River Fowey. ... Helston (Cornish: Hellys or Henlys) is a small town and civil parish in the Kerrier district of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, at the northern end of the Lizard Peninsula. ... Wherrytown is a settlement in Cornwall, UK situated between Penzance and Newlyn. ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... Newlyn Map sources for Newlyn at grid reference SW461284 Newlyn (Cornish: Lulynn) is a town in southwest Cornwall, UK. The town forms a small conurbation with neighbouring Penzance, and part of the civil parish of Penzance. ... Electric phosphate smelting furnace in a TVA chemical plant (1942) Chemical reduction, or smelting, is a form of extractive metallurgy. ... Chyandour is a small settlement within the boundaries of the parish of Penzance, Cornwall, UK. Historically Chyandour was one for the boudaries of the Borough of Penzance and was the site of large tin smelting works. ... Barclays Bank headquarters One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ...


Cityscape

 The Humphy Davy Statue and the Penzance Market House.
The Humphy Davy Statue and the Penzance Market House.

Large sections of the Penzance Parish are classified as conservation areas under the Penwith local plan[48] and are subject to special planning laws. The current conservation area forms most of the core of the town of Penzance and the historic harbour areas of Newlyn and Mousehole [49].. A number of Georgian and Regency buildings are present in the town. However, the majority of developments in the town centre itself are of mixed date, including several 20th century buildings - one of which, the former Pearl Insurance building (now the Tremenheere Wetherspoons pub), was subject to comment by Sir John Betjeman[50] who wrote, in 1963: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 600 KB) [edit] Summary Statue of Sir Humphry Davy Market Jew Street, Penzance, Cornwall, United Kingdom June 2006 Author Chris Angove [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 600 KB) [edit] Summary Statue of Sir Humphry Davy Market Jew Street, Penzance, Cornwall, United Kingdom June 2006 Author Chris Angove [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects... A conservation area is a tract of land that has been awarded protected status in order to ensure that natural features or biota are safeguarded. ... The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons or spoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ... Sir John Betjeman (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was a British poet and writer on architecture. ...

Penzance has done much to destroy its attractive character. The older houses in the narrow centre round the market hall have been pulled down and third-rate commercial 'contemporary', of which the Pearl Assurance building is a nasty example, are turning it into Slough.

There are three large residential council estates in Penzance: Penalverne, Treneere (both built in the 1930s) and the Princess Royal estate at Alverton (built in the early 1950s). Much of the housing with this area is owned and operated by Penwith Housing Association. The sub-tropical Morrab Gardens, which has a large collection of tender trees and shrubs, many of which cannot be grown outdoors anywhere else in the UK. Penzance Regency and Georgian terraces and houses are common in some parts of the town. Penzance's former main street Chapel Street has a number of interesting features including the Egyptian House, The Union Hotel (including a Georgian theatre which is no longer in use) and The Branwell House, where the mother and aunt of the famous Brontë sisters once lived. Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority (Borough of Slough) in Berkshire, England. ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Treneere is a residential council estate on the outskirts of Penzance, Cornwall, built in the 1930s. ... Penwith Housing Association are a social housing provider based in Cornwall, UK. Formed in 1994 following the sale of Penwith District Councils`s housing stock. ... The Morrab Gardens cover approximately three acres (12,000 m²) and are set in the centre of Penzance, Cornwall. ... The Regency style of architecture refers primarily to buildings built in Britain during the period in the early 19th century when George IV of the United Kingdom was still Prince Regent, and also to later buildings following the same style. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The Brontë sisters, painted by their brother, Branwell c. ...

Jubilee Pool, Penzance
Jubilee Pool, Penzance

Also of interest is the seafront with its promenade and the open-air seawater Jubilee Bathing Pool (one of the oldest surviving Art Deco swimming baths in the country), built at the beginning of the 20th century during Penzance's heyday as a fashionable seaside resort. The pool was designed by designed by Captain F. Latham, the Penzance Borough Engineer and opened in 1935, the year of King George V's Silver Jubilee[51]. Penzance promenade itself has been destroyed in parts several times by storms. The most recent example was on the 7 March 1962 (Ash Wednesday), when large parts of the Western end of the promenade, the nearby Beford Bolitho Gardens (now a play park) and the village of Wherrytown suffered severe damage [52]. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 107 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance Lido (swimming pool) Battery Rocks Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x750, 107 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Penzance Lido (swimming pool) Battery Rocks Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... A Promenade is a seaside walkway constructed so that people can enjoy walking near the sea without getting their clothes wet and dirty. ... A Lido, in the United Kingdom and some other countries, refers to a public outdoor swimming pool and surrounding facilities, or part of a beach where people can swim, lie in the sun or participate in water sports. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... King George V King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Emperor of India His Majesty King George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert) (3 June 1865–20 January 1936) was the last British monarch of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changing the name to the... A Silver Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 25th anniversary. ...


Geography

Penlee quarry which is within the boundaries of the Penzance parish is a geological SSSI. A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ...


Education

Penzance is home to two state run comprehensive schools (Mount's Bay and Humphry Davy) and one Church of England independent school (Bolitho school). Bolitho school was founded in the early 1990s following the financial collapse of the former School of St Clare. Post 16 education is catered for by Penwith College, founded in 1981 from the sixth form departments of the former Penzance Girls Grammar school and the Humphry Davy grammar school[53]. Throughout the Penzance parish there are 8 primary schools including the newly created Pensans primary school which was formed in 2006 from the former Penzance Junior school and the Lescudjack infants school. There is also a special educational needs school within the parish boundary named Nancealverne. A Comprehensive school is a type of school providing secondary level education in England or Wales. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Grammar school can refer to various types of schools in different English-speaking countries. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... A Junior School is most commonly a school for pupils aged 7-11 in the United Kingdom. ...


Culture

Festivals

Every June since 1991, the Golowan Festival (which includes Mazey Day) has been held in the town. Before the 1930s Penzance was the scene of large May Day celebrations, which saw local children making and using tin 'May horns' and 'May whistles'. The Feast Day of Corpus Christi was also celebrated in Penzance. The Corpus Christi fair has been a long standing event in the town, and is currently undergoing attempts to revive it in a more traditional format. A bagpipe band from Mid Argyll walk along Market Jew Street The Golowan Festival is held in Penzance during June each year. ... The West Cornwall May Day celebrations are an example folk practices found in the Western part of Cornwall,United Kingdom associated with the coming of spring. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Corpus Christi celebrations in Antigua Guatemala, 14 June 1979 This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ...


Allantide, a Cornish version of Halloween, was also a popular activity in the town. Many of these customs were recorded by local antiquarian M. A. Courtney and have influenced historical views of traditional Cornish cultural activities. Cornish festival that was traditionally celebrated on the 31st October The followimg is a description of the festival as it was celebrated in Penzance at the turn of the century Allantide the shops in Penzance would display Allan apples which were highly polished large apples. ... Margaret Ann Courtney(1834- ?). was an author resident in Penzance, Cornwall, UK in the late 19th century. ...


Music and theatre

Penzance is the home of the pirates in Gilbert and Sullivan's opera The Pirates of Penzance. At the time the libretto was written, 1879, Penzance had long been a peaceful town, so the very idea of it being overrun by pirates was amusing. Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sir W. S. Gilbert Sir Arthur Sullivan Librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900) collaborated on a series of fourteen comic operas in Victorian England between 1871 and 1896. ... Poster announcing the copyright performance at the Bijou Theatre, Paignton The Pirates of Penzance, or The Slave of Duty, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Penzance is home to the Acorn Theatre sited within a former Methodist Chapel. The theatre provides a mixture of theatre film dance music and cabaret and is partially public funded. The Savoy is an independent cinema located in the Town opened in 1912 and originally named the Victoria Hall music hall, The Savoy is one of the locations of performances sponsored by the Penwith film society (an arts cinema society based in the Penwith area). Prior to World War II Penzance was also home to a further 3 cinemas and at least 2 theatres, one of which the Pavilion Theatre is now home to an amusement arcade.


Musician Patrick Wolf has a song entitled Penzance. Patrick Wolf (born June 30, 1983) is a pop singer, songwriter and musician born in St Thomas Hospital, London, England[1] who grew up in South London. ...


Art galleries

Penzance will be home to the new Newlyn Art Gallery establishment "the exchange" which will open in 2007. Penzance is also the home of Penlee House, an art gallery and museum notable for its collection of paintings by members of the Newlyn School. Within Penzance town centre there are a growing number of commercial art galleries. Newlyn Art Gallery is a contemporary art gallery located in Newlyn, Cornwall ,UK. The art gallery was the former home of works by the Newlyn School of Art which are now largely located at Penlee House Gallery and Museum in nearby Penzance. ... Categories: Organization stubs | Museums in the UK | Art museums and galleries in the UK | Cornwall ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... For building painting, see painter and decorator. ... The Newlyn School is a term used to describe a colony of artists based in or near to Newlyn, a fishing village adjacent to Penzance, Cornwall, from the 1880s until the early 20th century. ...


Religion

Like other Cornish towns Methodism is the predominant Christian denomination. Prior to the 1980's Penzance had six methodist churches, but this number has now been reduced to three. Penzance is also home to a Salvation Army citadel, a Roman Catholic Church, two Church of England parish churches (formerly three), a Christadelphian meeting hall,[54] two Evangelical independent churches, the Penwith pagan moot, a independent Baptist church and a buddhist meditation group. For the Methodist school of ancient Greek medicine, see Methodism (history of medicine) Methodism or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organization founded in 1865 by one time Methodist minister William Booth. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Christadelphians are a nontrinitarian Christian Britain and North America in the 19th century. ... Look up Evangelical in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Pagan may refer to: A believer in Paganism or Neopaganism Bagan, a city in Myanmar also known as Pagan Pagan (album), the 6th album by Celtic metal band Cruachan Pagan Island, of the Northern Mariana Islands Pagan Lorn, a metal band from Luxembourg, Europe (1994-1998) Pagans Mind, is... Baptist is a term describing a tradition within Christianity and may also refer to individuals belonging to a Baptist church or a Baptist denomination. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by...


Sport

Penzance was, until recently, the home of Cornwall's most successful rugby team, the Penzance Pirates (Penzance and Newlyn RFC). The National Division 1 side relocated to Truro in 2005 in a bid to reach the Premiership and was renamed as the Cornish Pirates. In 2006 the side relocated again this time to the home ground of Camborne Rugby Club. Penzance is also home to Mount's Bay RFC a new Rugby club founded in 1999. The Cornish Pirates are a professional rugby union team who play in National Division One, and are the premier Cornish rugby club. ... Not to be confused with Cambourne in Cambridgeshire. ... Mounts Bary RFC are a Rugby club formed in December 1999 based in Penzance , UK. Initially formed as an off shoot from Penzance and Newlyn RFC the club plays now in South West 1 League of the English RFU. The clubs history so far is as follows. ...


Former England and Surrey cricketer Jack Richards (born Clifton James Richards) was born in Penzance. Although he only played 8 test matches, Richards was the wicket keeper during England's Ashes win in 1986. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... For the insect, see Cricket (insect). ... Clifton James Richards (born August 10, 1958, Penzance, Cornwall) is a former English cricketer who played in 8 Tests and 22 ODIs from 1981 to 1988. ... A Test match in progress. ... A wicket-keeper in characteristic position, ready to face a delivery. ... The Ashes is a Test cricket series, played between England(the mighty mighty england, barmy army barmy army) and Australia - it is international crickets oldest and most celebrated rivalry dating back to 1882. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Notable residents past and present

The celebrated scientist Sir Humphry Davy
The celebrated scientist Sir Humphry Davy

Penzance has been home to numerous persons of note over the years including model Jean Shrimpton and cricketer Jack Richards (For a full list see List of notable residents of Penzance) Arguably Penzance's most famous son,though, was Sir Humphry Davy. Image File history File links Sir_Humphry_Davy2. ... Image File history File links Sir_Humphry_Davy2. ... Jean Shrimpton (b. ... Clifton James Richards (born August 10, 1958, Penzance, Cornwall) is a former English cricketer who played in 8 Tests and 22 ODIs from 1981 to 1988. ... List of notable residents of Penzance, a town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, UK. John Noble Barlow Andrew Ketcham Barnett William Colenso Leonard Courtney, 1st Baron Courtney of Penwith Sir Humphry Davy John Davy (chemist) John Divane Martin Fido John Forbes (physician) Simon A. Forward Norman Garstin Jan Harvey... Humphry Davy Sir Humphry Davy (December 17, 1778 - May 29, 1829), often incorrectly spelled Humphrey, was an Cornish chemist. ...

Sir Humphry Davy

Main article: Sir Humphry Davy

Penzance was the birth place of the famous chemist Sir Humphry Davy. Davy was President of the Royal Society and invented the process of electrolysis, was the first person to isolate sodium, as well as proving (with Michael Faraday) that diamonds are made of pure carbon. Today he is possibly best known as the inventor of the Miner's Safety Lamp, or Davy lamp. There is a statue of Davy at the top of Market Jew Street, near the house in which he was born. One of Penzance's secondary schools is also named after the scientist [9]. Humphry Davy Sir Humphry Davy (December 17, 1778 - May 29, 1829), often incorrectly spelled Humphrey, was an Cornish chemist. ... Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet, FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was an esteemed British chemist and physicist. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... It has been suggested that Electrolytic process be merged into this article or section. ... General Name, Symbol, Number sodium, Na, 11 Chemical series alkali metals Group, Period, Block 1, 3, s Appearance silvery white Atomic mass 22. ... Michael Faraday, FRS (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was an English chemist and physicist (or natural philosopher, in the terminology of that time) who contributed significantly to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ... Davy lamp The Davy lamp is a candle containing safety lamp devised in 1815 by Humphry Davy. ...


Twinning

Penzance is twinned with the following towns [55] For the 1997 film, see Twin Town Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

From 1967 to 1974 Penzance was twinned with Image File history File links Flag_of_France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brittany. ... Concarneau is a commune of the Finistère département, in France. ... Brittany has an expansive coastline Flag of Brittany (Gwenn-ha-du) Historical province of Brittany région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Australia. ... Bendigo is a regional city in central Victoria, Australia, located in the City of Greater Bendigo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Nevada City is the county seat of Nevada County, California, USA, 166 miles (267 km) northeast of San Francisco. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...

This twinning arrangement was passed to the Penwith District in 1974. Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Cuxhaven beach at sunset Cuxhaven is a town in Lower Saxony, Germany, with about 55000 inhabitants. ... Penwith (Cornish: Penwyth) is a local government district in Cornwall, UK. It is the westernmost district in the UK, other than the Isles of Scilly. ...


See also

There have been four ships of the Royal Navy name HMS Penzance. ... This is a list of topics related to Cornwall, UK. The Cornwall category contains a more comprehensive selection of Cornish articles. ...

References

  1. ^ a b 2001 UK census
  2. ^ Penzance Charter of Incorporation dated 9 May 1614, held by Penzance Town Council
  3. ^ Extent of the property held by the Manor of Alverton and accounts transcribed by Mr Paul Brand from the original held in the National Archives
  4. ^ Canon Diggens Archive 1910
  5. ^ Notes on the Madron Parish Registers -Canon Jennings
  6. ^ A History of the Church in Paul Parish by G. M. Trelease
  7. ^ Grant of Market to Thomas Lord Berkley 8 April 1404
  8. ^ Grant of harbour dues Henry VIII 16 March 1512
  9. ^ Topographical Dictionary of England—1831
  10. ^ Guthrie, A (1994). Cornwall in the Age of Steam. Padstow: Tabb House. ISBN 1-873951-16-7. 
  11. ^ Kittridge, Alan (1989). Cornwall's Maritime Heritage. Truro: Twelveheads Press. ISBN 0-906294-15-0. 
  12. ^ Bennett, Alan (1987). Cornwall Through the Mid Nineteenth Century. Southampton: Kingfisher Railway Publications. ISBN 0-946184-26-7. 
  13. ^ The online parish clerk
  14. ^ [1] Sources of Cornish History - The Lisbon Earthquake
  15. ^ UK & Ireland Genealogogy - Penzance
  16. ^ (1859) Murray's Handbook of Devon and Cornwall. London: John Murray. 
  17. ^ Carter, Clive. "If it's metal take it to Holman's". Archive 3: 49 - 64. 
  18. ^ Bennett, Alan (1987). Cornwall Through the Mid Nineteenth Century. Southampton: Kingfisher Railway Publications. ISBN 0-946184-26-7. 
  19. ^ Langley, RC; Jenkins, SC (2002). The West Cornwall Railway. Usk: Oakwood Press. ISBN 0-85361-589-6. 
  20. ^ MacDermot, ET (1931). History of the Great Western Railway, Vol. 2 1863 - 1921. London: Great Western Railway. 
  21. ^ Sheppard, Geof (2002). "The Last Broad Gauge Train". Broadsheet 47: 26 - 34. 
  22. ^ a b c d Bennett, Alan (1988). The Great Western Railway in West Cornwall. Cheltenham: Runpast Publishing. DOI:1990. ISBN 1-870754-12-3. 
  23. ^ Guthrie, A (1994). Cornwall in the Age of Steam. Padstow: Tabb House. ISBN 1-873951-16-7. 
  24. ^ Stockdale, FWL (1824). Excursions in the County of Cornwall. London: Simpkin and Marshall.  (Reprinted by D Bradford Barton, Truro, 1972)
  25. ^ Kittridge, Alan (1989). Cornwall's Maritime Heritage. Truro: Twelveheads Press. ISBN 0-906294-15-0. 
  26. ^ Duckworth, CLD; Langmuir, GE (1948). Railway and Other Steamers. Preston: T Stephenson. DOI:1968. 
  27. ^ [http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/Cornwall/Penzance/index.html#Population UK & Ireland Genealogogy - Penzance
  28. ^ Kelley, Philip J (1973). Road Vehicles of the Great Western Railway. Headington: Oxford Publishing. ISBN 090288-12-9. 
  29. ^ Carter, Clive. "If it's metal take it to Holman's". Archive 3: 49 - 64. 
  30. ^ Bennett, Alan (1988). The Great Western Railway in West Cornwall. Cheltenham: Runpast Publishing. DOI:1990. ISBN 1-870754-12-3. 
  31. ^ Langley, RC; Jenkins, SC (2002). The West Cornwall Railway. Usk: Oakwood Press. ISBN 0-85361-589-6. 
  32. ^ Mais, SPB (1928). The Cornish Riviera. London: Great Western Railway. DOI:edition, 1934 Third edition, 1934. 
  33. ^ Market Jew Street to Trafalgar Square, calculated using The AA Route Planner
  34. ^ Penzance railway station live departure information
  35. ^ [2] Isles of Scilly helicopter homepage
  36. ^ [3] Newquay airport
  37. ^ [4] Plymouth airport
  38. ^ http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2002/20022593.htm
  39. ^ BBC article 27th of October 2007, House price report
  40. ^ 2004 indices of deprivation - Employemnt deprivation index
  41. ^ a b Bristol University regional poverty files - West Cornwall
  42. ^ Coinage charter granted by Charles II 18 August 1663
  43. ^ PAS Pool History of the Borough and Town of Penzance 1974 page 74
  44. ^ Mines and Miners Of Cornwall Vol 4. pages 17-21
  45. ^ Mindat.org mine information [5]
  46. ^ PAS Pool history of the town and Borough of Penzance 1974
  47. ^ Company History Barclays PLC Website
  48. ^ http://www.penwith.gov.uk/local_plan_penwith/maps/i01c.htm
  49. ^ List of Penwith conservation areas from PenwitH Council Website [6]
  50. ^ The History of the Town and Borough of Penzance 1974 PAS Pool - Review of Architecture
  51. ^ Janet Smith Liquid Assets - the lidos and open air swimming pools of Britain ISBN: 0954744500
  52. ^ History of the town and Borough of Penzance
  53. ^ West Penwith Resources Schools [7]
  54. ^ Find your Local Christadelphians: Penzance. Retrieved on 2007-02-14.
  55. ^ Information supplied by Penzance Concarneau Twinning Assocciation Chair Mrs D Cotton and The Penzance, Bendigo and Nevada City Twinning Association

May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... Events April 5 - In Virginia, Native American Pocahontas marries English colonist John Rolfe. ... The National Archives is a British Governmental organisation created in April 2003. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links



 
Civil Parishes of Penwith District
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  Results from FactBites:
 
GENUKI: Penzance (2654 words)
Madron Enumeration Districts 17 to 18 [Borough of Penzance].
Madron Enumeration Districts 19 and 20 [Borough of Penzance].
Madron Enumeration Districts 23 and 24 [Borough of Penzance].
Britain.tv Wikipedia - Penzance (2285 words)
Throughout the period prior to Penzance gaining Borough status in 1614 the village and surrounding areas fell within the control of the Manor of Alverton and was subject to the taxation regime of that manor.
Penzance's closest airports are in Newquay for flights to Gatwick and Stansted, and Plymouth, which connects with Gatwick, Bristol, Dublin and Manchester.
Penzance Town Council does not have in place a system of political registration so councillors do not form groups of any kind and technically act independently, however the current political composition of the council (as of the 3rd of November 2006) is as follows.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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