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Pentecostalism is a movement within Evangelical Christianity that places special emphasis on the direct personal experience of God through the baptism of the Holy Spirit, as shown in the Biblical account of the Day of Pentecost. Pentecostalism is similar to the Charismatic movement, but developed earlier and separated from mainstream denominations. Charismatic Christians, at least in the early days of the movement, tended to remain in their respective denominations. The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... In Christian Pentecostal theology, Baptism with the Holy Spirit is a second baptism, in fire, spoken of by Jesus in the Gospels. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The charismatic movement began...

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Beliefs

There are two large streams of Pentecostal churches. The majority believe that one must be saved by believing in Jesus as Lord and Savior for the forgiveness of sins and to be made acceptable to God. Pentecostals also typically believe, like most other evangelicals, that the Bible has definitive authority in matters of faith. To this first group, speaking in tongues is the sign of the Baptism of the Holy Ghost, but isn't necessary for salvation. The other group emphasize an "Acts 2:38" based salvation message which says that a person needs to repent and be baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus, and then receive the Holy Spirit. Receiving the Holy Spirit is necessary for salvation but is not accompanied by speaking in tongues. Of the Acts 2:38 based churches, they fall into four categories of "Jesus Name", "First", "United" or "Oneness" Pentecostals, which baptize in Jesus' name only, and those that baptize in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit (in accordance with Matthew 28:19). Also, pentecostals have different views on the idea of what "tongues" actually means. Some believe tongues is a prayer language in which they themselves do not understand what they are saying. Others believe tongues is an actual language and the ability to speak the mysteries of God unto the unsaved using their language. In both views the ability to speak and the ability to interpret are separate gifts. One may be able to speak in a certain language but will lack the ability to interpret any other language they have not been gifted with the understanding to speak. Both generally believe there must be an interpreter present so the listeners will understand when a different language, or tongue, is spoken unto them. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Released on September 27, 2005 by 845Ent. ... Released on September 27, 2005 by 845Ent. ... Oneness (concept) is related to Enlightenment and is referring to the experience of oneness and nonduality. ...


Because many Pentecostal denominations are descended from Methodism and the Methodist Holiness Movement, Pentecostal soteriology is generally Arminian rather than Calvinist. For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... Soteriology is the study of salvation. ... Arminianism is a Protestant Christian theology founded by the Dutch theologian Jacobus Arminius. ... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ...


The Pentecostal movement finds its historic roots in the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California, USA from 1904 to 1906. Several years earlier, in 1901, Bible college students at a school founded by Charles Parham in Topeka, Kansas prayed to be baptized with the Holy Spirit and spoke in tongues (other languages). Parham moved to Houston, Texas, where in spite of segregation, William Seymore, a one-eyed African-American preacher was allowed to listen in to the Bible classes. Seymore went to Los Angeles, where his preaching helped spark the fires of the Azusa Street revival. Most Pentecostal demoninations can trace their roots to the Azusa Street revival or were strongly influenced by it. The Azusa Street Revival was a Pentecostal revival meeting that took place in Los Angeles, California and was led by William J. Seymour, an African American preacher. ...


Oneness Pentecostalism traces its roots to the The World-Wide Apostolic Camp Meeting in April 1913 where one of the preachers started teaching Oneness doctrine.


In the late 1960s and early 1970s Christians from mainline churches in the United States, Europe, and other parts of the world began to accept the teaching that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is available for Christians today. Charismatic movements began to grow in mainline denominations. There were Charismatics Episcopalians, Lutherans, Catholics, and Methodists. During that time period, 'Charismatic' was used to refer to these movements that existed within mainline denominations. Pentecostal was used to refer to those who were a part of the churches and denominations that grew out of the earlier Azusa Street revival. However, in recent decades, many independent Charismatic churches and ministries have formed or have developed their own denominations and church associations. In the 1960s, many Pentecostal churches were still strict with dress codes and forbidding certain forms of entertainment, creating a cultural distinction between Charismatics and Pentecostals. Nowadays, many Pentecostal churches put little emphases on dress and entertainment issues. There is a great deal of overlap now between the Charismatic and Pentecostal movements.


Trinitarian Pentecostals typically believe in water baptism as an outward sign of conversion and that the baptism in the Holy Ghost is a distinct spiritual experience that all who have belief in Jesus should receive. Most classical Pentecostals believe that the baptism in the Holy Ghost is always accompanied initially by the outward evidence of speaking in tongues. It is considered a liberalizing tendency to teach contrary to this historic position. This is another major difference between Pentecostal and Charismatic Christians, who believe that a Christian baptized in the Holy Ghost may exhibit certain supernatural signs, including speaking in tongues, "being slain in the spirit" (where people fall to the ground as if asleep ), prophecy (i.e., a vision or a word of God, spoken or felt in the spirit), miraculous healings, miraculous signs, etc. Tongues redirects here. ...


Theology

Theologically, most Pentecostal denominations are aligned with Evangelicalism in that they emphasize the reliability of the Bible and the need for the transformation of an individual's life with faith in Jesus. Pentecostals also adhere to the doctrine of Biblical inerrancy. Pentecostals differ from fundamentalists by placing less emphasis on personal spiritual experience and more emphasis on the Holy Ghost's work within a person than other Protestants. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Biblical... Fundamentalist Christianity, or Christian fundamentalism, is a movement that arose mainly within British and American Protestantism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by conservative evangelical Christians, who, in a reaction to modernism, actively affirmed a fundamental set of Christian beliefs: the inerrancy of the Bible, Sola Scriptura, the...


One of the most prominent distinguishing characteristics of Pentecostalism from the rest of Evangelicalism is its emphasis on the work of the Holy Spirit. Most Pentecostals believe that everyone who is genuinely saved has the Holy Ghost with them. But unlike most other Christians they believe that there is a second work of the Holy Ghost called the baptism of the Holy Spirit, in which the Holy Ghost dwells more fully in them, and which opens a believer up to a closer fellowship with God and empowers them for Christian service. Some Pentecostals have modified the view teaching that Spirit baptism is not considered a second chronological work of grace, but a second aspect of the Holy Ghost's ministry. His first ministry is to save and sanctify the believer by working in them; His second ministry is to empower the believer for service by working through them. Most Pentecostals cite speaking in tongues, also known as glossolalia, as the normative proof, and evidence of the Holy Ghost baptism. Some Pentecostals have adopted a more liberal view claiming that there are other evidences of Holy Ghost baptism. The doctrine of tongues as the initial evidence of receiving the Holy Ghost is uniquely Pentecostal and is one of the few differences from Charismatic theology which generally claims diverse evidences. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream... In Christian Pentecostal theology, Baptism with the Holy Spirit is a second baptism, in fire, spoken of by Jesus in the Gospels. ... Tongues redirects here. ...


Pentecostals believe it is essential to repent for the remission of sins and believe in Jesus Christ as Savior in order to obtain salvation. Many believe that the baptism of the Holy Ghost is an additional gift that is bestowed on believers, generally subsequent to an intermediary step termed sanctification. Sanctification refers to a work of grace wherein the effects of past sins are ameliorated and the natural tendency toward a sinful nature is likewise set aside through the working of the Holy Ghost. Other Pentecostals believe that Holy Ghost Baptism is a necessary step in God's plan of salvation citing Peter's answer to the crowd on the Day of Pentecost. The crowd asked Peter what they must do to be saved, and Peter told them to repent, be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and that they would receive the gift of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:37-8). Sanctification or in its verb form, sanctify, literally means to set apart for special use or purpose, that is to make holy or sacred (compare Latin sanctus holy). Therefore sanctification refers to the state or process of being set apart, i. ...


Pentecostals vary in their beliefs of the types of speaking in tongues (1 Cor. 12:28). Following are some possible distinctions. First, there is the evidence at the baptism of the Holy Ghost. This is when a believer speaks in tongues when they are baptized with the Holy Ghost. This may or may not be the only time an individual ever speaks in tongues. Secondly, there is the gift of tongues. This is when a person is moved by God to speak in tongues during a church service or other Christian gathering for everyone to hear. The gift of tongues may be exercised anywhere; but many denominations believe that it must only be exercised with a person who has the gift of "interpretation of tongues" present (whether that be another person or the one who gives the tongue). The interpreter may interpret the tongue into the language of the gathered Christians so that they can understand the message (1 Cor. 14:13, 27-28). Tongues redirects here. ...


Many Pentecostals, particularly after the growth and influence of the Charismatic movement believe that speaking in tongues can be used as a prayer language at any time one chooses, provided he has been baptized in the Holy Spirit. Certain groups of Pentecostals emphasize the idea of speaking in tongues only when the Holy Spirit comes upon an individual, and have a problem with the idea of speaking in tongues 'at will.' God gives a wide variety of spiritual gifts. It may be that these doctrinal differences resulted from certain church leaders taking their own experiences and making doctrines out of them. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The charismatic movement began...


Dr. Dale A. Robbins writes in regard to charismatic beliefs that church history argues against the idea that charismatic gifts went away shortly after the apostolic age. Dr. Robbins quotes the early church father Irenaeus (ca. 130-202) as writing, "...we hear many of the brethren in the church who have prophetic gifts, and who speak in tongues through the Spirit, and who also bring to light the secret things of men for their benefit [word of knowledge]...". Dr. Robbins also cites Irenaeus writing, "When God saw it necessary, and the church prayed and fasted much, they did miraculous things, even of bringing back the spirit to a dead man." According to Dr. Robbins, Tertullian (ca. 155–230) reported similar incidents, as did Origen (ca. 182 - 251), Eusebius (ca. 275 – 339), Firmilian (ca. 232-269), and Chrysostom (ca. 347 - 407).[1] Dr. Dale A. Robbins, and his wife Jerri, have pastored congregations in California, Ohio and Indiana, and have conducted thousands of meetings in churches nationwide. ... Irenaeus (Greek: Εἰρηναῖος), (b. ... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian, (ca. ... Origen Origen (Greek: ÅŒrigénÄ“s, 185–ca. ... Eusebius is the name of several significant historical people: Pope Eusebius - Pope in AD 309 - 310. ... Saint Firmilian (died c. ... John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ...


Justin Martyr (100-165), in his Dialogue with Trypho, argues with a non-Christian Jew that the church had prophets, while the Jews no longer had them. The Second Century document The Shepherd of Hermas recounts visions and revelations and affirms the role of the gift of prophecy in the church. The popularity of this book in churches of the second century is strong evidence that the gift of prophecy was still widely accepted as being legitimate. Justin Martyr (also Justin the Martyr, Justin of Caesarea, Justin the Philosopher) (100–165) was an early Christian apologist and saint. ... The Shepherd of Hermas is a Christian work of the first or second century which had great authority in ancient times and was considered by some as one of the books of the Bible. ...


Some critics of spiritual gifts argue that these spiritual gifts died out and were only claimed by heretical groups. Usually they mention the 'new prophecy' of the Montanists around the turn of the second century to prove their claims. A careful study of history, however, shows that the gift of prophecy was generally accepted by the church in that day. Criticism of the Montanists had initially to deal with the ecstatic manner in which Montanus, Priscilla, Maximilla and others prophesied. After these three had died and prophecy had apparently ceased among the Montanists, Eusebius records a debate between an Orthodox believer and a Montanist. The Orthodox believer pointed out that the Montanists no longer had prophecy, though the apostle (Paul) affirmed that the gift would continue until the Lord returned. (See I Corinthians 1:7.) It is clear that the church accepted the continuing of the gift of prophecy.


The world's largest Pentecostal denomination, the Assemblies of God[citation needed], holds to the belief in Trinitarian theology in accordance with mainstream Protestantism[1] as does the Elim Pentecostal Church, Church of God, the Church of God in Christ, The Apostolic Church, and the Foursquare Church. For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The adjective trinitarian is used in several senses: Ideas or things pertaining to the Holy Trinity A person or group adhering to the doctrine of Trinitarianism, which holds God to subsist in the form of the Holy Trinity The Trinitarian Order is a Catholic monastic order founded in 1198 by... The Elim Pentecostal Church (EPC) is a U.K.-based Pentecostal Christian denomination (not to be confused with the U.S.-based Elim Fellowship). ... Church of God is a name used by numerous, mostly unrelated bodies, most of which descend from either Pentecostal/Holiness or Adventist traditions. ... For other uses, see Church of God. ... The term Foursquare Gospel came about during an intense revival in the city of Oakland, California in July 1922. ...


Most Pentecostal churches hold the belief that preaching the Gospel to unbelievers is extremely important. "The Great Commission" to spread the "Good News of the Kingdom of God", spoken by Jesus directly before his Ascension, [2] is perceived as one of the most important commands that Jesus gave. Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ...


According to a recent study, 40% of pentecostals or more did not speak or pray in tongues, in 6 out of 10 counties surveyed.[3]


Oneness

Some Pentecostal churches, however, hold to Oneness theology, which decries the traditional doctrine of the Trinity. Oneness doctrine holds that God is absolutely and indivisibly one and that Jesus was the one God manifested in the flesh (Timothy 3:16, John 1:1-11, John 10:30), the division of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost as some of God's manifestations rather than persons; furthermore they are seen as titles to Jesus. This type of teaching is largely associated with the pentecostal church, yet is not based solely on the pentecostal experience. The Jesus-Only doctrine is that which is taught by Oneness Pentecostals such as the United Pentecostal Church and other Protestant denominations. ... This article is about the Christian Trinity. ...


Therefore, Oneness Pentecostals baptize believers "in Jesus' name" (Acts 2:38,8:5-16, 10:48) rather than what they refer to as the titles: "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost." The largest Oneness Pentecostal denominations are the United Pentecostal Church International (www.upci.org), Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, Apostolic Assembly of the Faith in Christ Jesus, and the Apostolic Church of the Faith in Christ Jesus but there are many smaller Oneness Pentecostal organizations and independent churches such as the Assemblies of the Lord Jesus Christ, the True Jesus Church, the Pentecostal Followers of Jesus Christ International Ministries, Iglesia del Dios Vivo, the Pentecostal Churches of the Apostolic Faith, Bible Way, and independent or nondenominational churches. The majority, if not all, of Oneness Pentecostals also refer to themselves as Apostolics. The major Trinitarian Pentecostal organizations including the Pentecostal World Conference and the Fellowship of Pentecostal and Charismatic Churches of North America, have condemned Oneness theology as a heresy and refuse membership to churches holding this belief. This same holds true for some Oneness Pentecostals towards Trinitarian churches. The United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI) is a multi cultural United States based Christian organization and is headquartered in the St. ... The Pentecostal Assemblies of The World, Inc. ... The Apostolic Assembly of the Faith in Christ Jesus (Apostolic Assembly) is the oldest Spanish-speaking Oneness Pentecostal denomination in the United States. ... The Pentecostal World Conference or Pentecostal World Fellowship is a fellowship of Pentecostal believers and denominations from across the world. ... The Pentecostal/Charismatic Churches of North America is an interdenominational fellowship of Pentecostal and Charismatic churches in North America, existing for the purpose of promoting cooperation and understanding. ... Heresy, as a blanket term, describes a practice or belief that is labeled as unorthodox. ...


History

Pentecostals trace the history of the movement to the day of Pentecost when a week after Jesus ascended into Heaven (Acts 1), there were 120 believers waiting for the promise of the Father, that is the Holy Spirit. In Acts 2:4, when the Holy Spirit came upon the believers they all spoke in tongues (other languages). That notwithstanding, the practice of speaking in tongues has been reported and documented throughout Christian history; however, the roots of the current movement date back no earlier than the late 1700s. Modern revival movements over the past few hundred years have appeared and are referenced below.


One such revival began with a Prussian Guards officer, Gustav von Below, in 1817. He and his brothers started holding charismatic meetings on his estates in Pomerania. A Lutheran commission sent to investigate was at first suspicious but found the phenomenon to be "of God." This led to a growth in charismatic meetings across Germany which quickly crossed the Atlantic during the great German migrations of the nineteenth century.[citation needed] The Pentecostal movement also became prominent in the Holiness movement, which was the first to begin making numerous references to the term "Pentecostal", such as in 1867 when the movement established The National Camp Meeting Association for the Promotion of Christian Holiness with a notice that said: [We are summoning,] irrespective of denominational tie...those who feel themselves comparatively isolated in their profession of holiness…that all would realize together a Pentecostal baptism of the Holy Ghost.... Gustav von Below (18th July 1790-19th November 1843) was the son of Karl Gustav von Below (1759-1840) and Charlotte Wilhelmine von Woedtke (1757-1798), one of three brothers and two sisters. ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... The Holy Spirit, from the Christian viewpoint, while related to Gods will, is not Gods will personified. ...


England and parts of Europe experienced another Charismatic- or Pentecostal-type movement before the Pentecostal movement started in the United States. In the 1830s, in England, a church under the leadership of Edward Irving began to experience manifestations of tongues and prophecy. Through prophecy, certain men were appointed as apostles. Certain apostles were appointed by these apostles until the number reached 12. Irving passed away, but the movement developed into what would be called the Catholic Apostolic Church, taken from the Nicene Creed. Henry Drummond was, perhaps, the most influential 'apostle' in the movement. He was quite fond of the writings of the so-called 'church fathers', and the movement took on a highly liturgical flair, including influences from Eastern Orthodoxy liturgy. The movement grew to several thousand in England, Germany, and some other parts of Europe. Though a splinter group in Germany did appoint new apostles and continue on, the English group did not. The last official of the Catholic Apostolic Church died in 1901, just a few months after Agnes Ozman spoke in tongues in the United States. Edward Irving (August 4, 1792 - December 7, 1834), Scottish church divine, generally (but wrongly) regarded as the founder of the Catholic Apostolic Church, was born at Annan, Dumfriesshire. ...


As early as the 1870s, there were Christians known as Gift People or Gift Adventists numbering in the thousands who were known for spiritual gifts such as speaking in tongues.* One preacher from the Gift People was influential on A.J. Tomlinson, an early leader in the Church of God (Cleveland, TN), which would become a Pentecostal denomination after the Azusa Street revival.


Although the 1896 Shearer Schoolhouse Revival in Cherokee County, North Carolina may rightfully be regarded as the literal beginning of the modern Pentecostal movement, the remoteness of this region very likely played a role in this event remaining localized for so long.[citation needed] Around 1901, however, Pentecostalism was to stand on a larger stage, as that was when Agnes Ozman began speaking in tongues (glossolalia) during a prayer meeting at Charles Fox Parham's Bethel Bible College in Topeka, Kansas in 1901. Parham, a minister of Methodist background, formulated the doctrine that tongues was the "Bible evidence" of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Further, Pentecostals point to the "upper room" experience of the gathered disciples of Jesus as described in Acts 2:1 and Peter's instructions in Acts 2:38 as justification for their practices. Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... The Shearer Schoolhouse Revival was a religious phenomenon that occurred during a series of meetings conducted in the summer of 1896 in Cherokee County, North Carolina. ... Cherokee County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Agnes Ozman (1870-1937) was a female student at Charles Fox Parhams Bethel Bible School in Topeka, Kansas. ... Tongues redirects here. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... Charles Fox Parham Charles Fox Parham (4 June 1873 - c. ... aka, Bethel Gospel School. ... This article is about the state capital of Kansas. ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... In Christian Pentecostal theology, Baptism with the Holy Spirit is a second baptism, in fire, spoken of by Jesus in the Gospels. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ... St Peter redirects here. ...


Parham left Topeka and began a revival meeting ministry. The most significant and controversial is his link to the Azusa Street Revival conducted by his student, the African-American, William J. Seymour. Parham taught W.J. Seymour in his school in Houston, Texas. Since W.J. Seymour was African-American, he was only allowed to sit outside the room to listen to Parham. A revival meeting is a series of Christian religious services held with an eye to encourage active members of a religious body and to provoke those outside of it to become part of it. ... The Azusa Street Revival was a Pentecostal revival meeting that took place in Los Angeles, California and was led by William J. Seymour, an African American preacher. ... William Joseph Seymour (May 2, 1870 - September 28, 1922) was an African American minister, and an initiator of the Pentecostal religious movement. ...


Although many instances of glossolalia occurred prior to 1906, The Azusa Street Revival led by William J. Seymour is the watershed of the Pentecostal movement in the U.S. and worldwide. It began on April 9, 1906, in Los Angeles, California, at the home of Edward Lee, who claimed the infilling of the Holy Spirit. William J. Seymour claimed that he was overcome with the Holy Ghost on April 12, 1906. On April 18, 1906, the Los Angeles Times ran a front page story on the revival, "Weird Babel of Tongues, New Sect of fanatics is breaking loose, Wild scene last night on Azusa Street, gurgle of wordless talk by a sister". By the third week in April, 1906, the small but growing congregation rented an abandoned African Methodist Episcopal Church at 312 Azusa Street and subsequently became organized as the Apostolic Faith Mission. Almost all mainline Pentecostal denominations today trace their historical roots to the Azusa Street Revival. is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... The Azusa Street Revival (1906–1909) took place in Los Angeles, California, and was led by William Seymour (1870–1922), an African American preacher. ... The Apostolic Faith Mission of Portland, Oregon, United States was founded in 1906 by Florence L. Crawford, after she received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California. ...


Pentecostalism, like any other major movement, has given birth to a large number of organizations, denominations, churches, sects, para-churches, separatists and even cults with political, social or theological differences. The movement's inception was counter-cultural to the social and political norms of society. Record numbers of African-American men and women, both Black and white were initial leaders. As the Azusa Revival began to wane, doctrinal differences began to surface as well as the pressure from social, cultural and political events of the time. As a result, major divisions, separation, isolationism, sectarianism and even the increase of extremism were apparent. Not wishing to affiliate with the Assemblies of God, formed in 1914, a group of ministers from predominantly white churches formed the Pentecostal Church of God in Chicago, Illinois in 1919. George Went Hensley, a preacher who had left the Church of God, Cleveland Tennessee (the oldest Pentecostal denomination in America) when it finally stopped embracing snake handling, is credited with creating the first church dedicated to this extreme practice in the 1920s. This became widely practiced in poor, rural areas of the Appalachians. In urban African-American communities of the 1940s, there were Father Divine with his Peace Mission and Daddy Grace, both claiming divinity, encouraging their followers to practice the estaticism of Pentecostalism. For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... // Basic Information The Pentecostal Church of God (PCG) is a predominantly white Pentecostal Christian denomination. ... Snake handling at the Pentecostal Church of God, Lejunior, Harlan County, Kentucky 09/15/1946 (National Archives and Records Administration). ...


The role of African-Americans and women cannot be underestimated in the early Pentecostal movement. The first decade of Pentecostalism was marked by interracial assemblies, "...Whites and blacks mix in a religious frenzy,..." according to a local newspaper account at a time when the Supreme Court of the United States declared in its landmark case, Plessy vs Ferguson of 1896 that government facilities were to remain racially separate, but equal. The decision ushered the Jim Crow practices of apartheid in the United States with racially separate and unequal facilities in the U.S. The forward interracial, gender equality and enthusiasm of the Azusa Revival lasted until 1924, when divisions occurred along racial (see Apostolic Faith Mission), gender and doctrinal lines. Interracial services continued for many years, even in parts of the segregated Southern United States, although after the waning years of the Azusa Revival, the practice of interracial services were nearly non-existent in many white Pentecostal churches. The Church of God, Cleveland, Tennessee, prior to the split in 1923, made significant inroads across racial divides, with missionary ministry to the Bahamas and elsewhere. After the 1923 divide, the bulk of the black membership followed Overseer A.J. Tomlinson into the Church of God of Prophecy. An interracial couple is a romantic couple or marriage in which the partners are of differing races. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... The Apostolic Faith Mission of Portland, Oregon, United States was founded in 1906 by Florence L. Crawford, after she received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California. ... Historic Southern United States. ...


From the late 1950s onwards, the Charismatic movement, which was to a large extent inspired and influenced by Pentecostalism, began to flourish in the mainline Protestant denominations, as well as the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches, fostered in Britain by organizations such as the Fountain Trust, founded by Michael Harper in 1964. Unlike "Classical Pentecostals," who formed strictly Pentecostal congregations or denominations, Charismatics adopted as their motto, "Bloom where God planted you." Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The charismatic movement began with the adoption of certain Pentecostal beliefs—specifically what are known as the biblical charisms of Christianity: speaking in tongues, prophesying, etc. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Fountain Trust was an ecumenical agency formed in the UK in 1964 to promote the charismatic renewal. ... Michael Claude Harper (b. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Some leaders who chose not to participate in the early 20th Century Pentecostal Movement remained highly respected by Pentecostal leaders of the 20th Century. Albert Benjamin Simpson became closely involved with the growing Pentecostal movement. It was common for Pentecostal pastors and missionaries to receive their training at the Missionary Training Institute that Simpson founded. Because of this, Simpson and the Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) (an evangelistic movement that Simpson founded) had a great influence on Pentecostalism, in particular the Assemblies of God and the Foursquare Church. This influence included evangelistic emphasis, C&MA doctrine, Simpson's hymns and books, and the use of the term 'Gospel Tabernacle,' which evolved into Pentecostal churches being known as 'Full Gospel Tabernacles.' Charles Price Jones, the African-American Holiness leader and founder of the Church of Christ is another example. His hymns are widely sung at National Coventions of the Church of God in Christ and many other Pentecostal churches. A. B. Simpson Albert Benjamin Simpson (December 15, 1843 – October 29, 1919) was a Canadian preacher, theologian, author, and founder of The Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA), an evangelical protestant denomination with an emphasis on global evangelism. ... The Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA) is an Evangelical Protestant denomination within Christianity. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The International Church of the Foursquare Gospel is an evangelical Pentecostal Christian denomination. ...


In the United Kingdom, the first Pentecostal church to be formed was the Apostolic Church. This was later followed by the Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance, later to be known as the Elim Pentecostal Church, founded in 1914 by George Jeffreys. The Apostolic Church is a Pentecostal Christian denomination which can trace its origins back to the 1904-1905 Welsh Revival. ... The Elim Pentecostal Church (EPC) is a U.K.-based Pentecostal Christian denomination (not to be confused with the U.S.-based Elim Fellowship). ... The Elim Pentecostal Church (EPC) is a U.K.-based Pentecostal Christian denomination (not to be confused with the U.S.-based Elim Fellowship). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... There were a few people named George Jeffreys: George Jeffreys was an English organ composer George Jeffreys, 1st Baron Jeffreys was a British politician, better known as Lord Jeffreys or Judge Jeffreys George Jeffreys founder of the Elim Pentecostal Church This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists...


In Sweden, the first Pentecostal church was the Filadelfia Church in Stockholm. Pastored by Lewi Pethrus, this congregation, originally Baptist, was expelled from the Baptist Union of Sweden in 1913 for doctrinal differences.[citation needed] Today this congregation has about 7000 members and is the biggest Pentecostal congregation in northern Europe. As of 2005, the Swedish pentecostal movement has approximately 90,000 members in nearly 500 congregations. These congregations are all independent but cooperate on a large scale. Swedish Pentecostals have been very missionary-minded and have established churches in many countries. In Brazil, for example, churches founded by the Swedish Pentecostal mission claim several million members. For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... Lewi Pethrus (11 March 1884 - 4 September 1974 was a Swedish Pentecostal minister who played a decisive role in the formation and development of the the Pentecostal movement in his country. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ...


The history of Pentecostalism in Australia has been documented by Dr Barry Chant in Heart of Fire (1984, Adelaide: Tabor). Reverend Dr Barry Chant is the author of Heart of fire: The story of Australian Pentecostalism (the first history of Australian pentecostalism) and a co-founder and founding Principal of Tabor College, Australia of which he is currently President. ...


Pentecostal denominations and adherents

Estimated numbers of Pentecostals vary widely. Christianity Today reported in an article titled World Growth at 19 Million a Year that according to historian Vinson Synan, dean of the Regent University School of Divinity in Virginia Beach, about 25 percent of the world's Christians are Pentecostal or charismatic. List of Christian denominations (or Denominations self-identified as Christian) ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... Christianity Today is an Evangelical Christian periodical based in Carol Stream, Illinois. ... Regent University is an accredited private, interdenominational Christian university that was founded by the American televangelist Pat Robertson in 1978. ... Part of the Virginia Beach oceanfront resort strip. ...


The largest Pentecostal denominations in the United States are the Church of God in Christ (Which is the 4th Largest denomination in the world),[citation needed] the Assemblies of God (Which is the largest Pentecostal denomination with over 12,311 churches in the U.S. and 283,413 churches and outstations in over 200 countries, and approximately 57 million adherents worldwide.) [4], New Testament Church, Church of God (Cleveland), Pentecostal Assemblies of the World, Assemblies of the Lord Jesus Christ, the United Pentecostal Church, and the United Gospel Tabernacles. According to a Spring 1998 article in Christian History, there are about 11,000 different Pentecostal or charismatic denominations worldwide.[citation needed] For other uses, see Church of God. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Church of God (Cleveland) is a Protestant Christian denomination whose headquarters are in Cleveland, Tennessee. ... The Pentecostal Assemblies of The World, Inc. ... The United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI) is a United States-based international Christian denomination of the Pentecostal movement, and is headquartered in the St. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


The size of Pentecostalism in the U.S. is estimated to be more than 20 million including approximately 918,000 (4%) of the Hispanic-American population, counting all unaffiliated congregations, although the numbers are uncertain, in part because some tenets of Pentecostalism are held by members of non-Pentecostal denominations in what has been called the charismatic movement. Toronto Canada, has a large Pentecostal population. The influence of immigrants from Jamaica, Africa, Latin America, Korea and elsewhere have created diverse churches throughout the city. Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ...


In Australia, Hillsong (led by Pastor Brian Houston) is the largest church with a membership exceeding 19,000. Many of their songs are sung across the Pentecostal churches. They are a member of Assemblies of God, which is one of the largest Pentecostal organizations in the world. Hillsong Church, with a congregation of over 15,000 on an average weekend, is likely the largest Christian church in Australia. ... Brian and Bobbie Houston Brian Houston is a Senior Pastor of Hillsong Church in Sydney, Australia, an Assemblies of God in Australia megachurch. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ...

Inside Hillsong Church (a Pentecostal Church).

Pentecostalism was estimated to number around 115 million followers worldwide in 2000; lower estimates place the figure near to 22 million (eg. Cambridge Encyclopedia), while the highest estimates apparently place the figure between 400 and 600 million. The great majority of Pentecostals are to be found in Developing Countries (see the Statistics subsection below), although much of their international leadership is still North America. Pentecostalism is sometimes referred to as the "third force of Christianity."[citation needed] The largest Pentecostal Christian church in the world is the Yoido Full Gospel Church in South Korea. Founded and led by David Yonggi Cho since 1958, it had 780,000 members in 2003.[citation needed] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 357 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Inside Hillsong Church, Sydney Photo taken by Matt Malone File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 357 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Inside Hillsong Church, Sydney Photo taken by Matt Malone File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... A developing country is a country with low average income compared to the world average. ... North America North America is a continent [1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Yonggi Cho is a Korean Christian minister. ... Jan. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


According to Christianity Today, Pentecostalism is "a vibrant faith among the poor; it reaches into the daily lives of believers, offering not only hope but a new way of living." [2]. In addition, according to a 1999 U.N. report, "Pentecostal churches have been the most successful at recruiting its members from the poorest of the poor." Brazilian Pentecostals talk of Jesus as someone real and close to them and doing things for them including providing food and shelter. - Krishneel Maharaj from India.


Outside the English speaking world

Pentecostal and charismatic church growth is rapid in many parts of the world. Missions expert David Barrett estimated in a Christianity Today article that the Pentecostal and charismatic church is growing by 19 million per year.


Jeffrey K. Hadden at the Department of Sociology at the University of Virginia collected statistics from the various large pentecostal organizations and from the work by David Stoll (David Stoll, "Is Latin American Turning Protestant?" published Berkeley: University of California Press. 1990) demonstrating that the Pentecostals are experiencing very rapid growth as can be seen on his website. In Myanmar, the Assemblies of God of Myanmar is one of the largest Christian denominations. The pentecostal churches Igreja do Evangelho Completo de Deus, Assembleias de Deus, Igrejas de Cristo and the Assembleias Evangelicas de Deus Pentecostales are among the largest denominations of Mozambique. The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...


According to the last census in Brazil, 25% of Brazilians are Protestants, most being Pentecostals or Charismatics (e.g., Assemblies of God, Christian Congregation of Brazil, Foursquare Gospel, Universal Church of the Kingdom of God, Charismatics Baptists). The biggest denomination is the Assemblies of God (Assembléia de Deus), which has about 10 million members. For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The Christian Congregation of Brazil or Congregação Cristã do Brasil was founded by Italian-American missionary Louis Francescon (1866-1964) in Sao Paulo in 1910. ... The International Church of the Foursquare Gospel is an evangelical Pentecostal Christian denomination. ... Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG, from Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus, IURD) is the name for a rapidly growing Brazilian church. ... For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ...


Among the Indian charismatic denominations are the Apostolic Church of Pentecost, Apostolic Pentecostal Church, Assemblies of Christ Church, Assemblies of God, Bible Pattern Church, Church of God (Full Gospel) in India, Church of God of Prophecy, Church of the Apostolic Faith, Elim Church, Nagaland Christian Revival Church, ICOF India, New Life Fellowship, The Pentecostal Mission, Open Bible Church of God, Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church, Pentecostal Holiness Church, Pentecostal Mission, United Pentecostal Church in India, India Pentecostal Church of God, Sharon Fellowship Church, Kerala, India (Founded by Pr. Thomachayan) has planted numerous Churches throughout the world. For other uses, see Assemblies of God (disambiguation). ... The Church of God (Full Gospel) in India is the registered name of the branch in India of the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This page has few or no links to other articles. ... The Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church (PFWBC) is best thought of as Pentecostal rather than Baptist. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Indian Pentecostal Church of God (IPC) is the largest indigenous Pentecostal movement in India, with its headquarters at Hebron, Kumbanad, Kerala-689547 India. ...


Geographical distribution

  • Source: Operation World by Patrick Johnstone and Jason Mandryk, 2000, unless otherwise indicated.
  • [24]
  • Statistics on pentecostal renewalists
  • World Christian Database

A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... World map showing the Americas CIA political map of the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere or New World, consisting of the continents of North America[1] and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Oceania (disambiguation). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...

Leaders

Main article: :Category:Pentecostals

Precursors

Willian E. Boardman (d. ... For the comedian, writer, and musician, see John Dowie (humourist). ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Edward Irving (August 4, 1792 - December 7, 1834), Scottish church divine, generally (but wrongly) regarded as the founder of the Catholic Apostolic Church, was born at Annan, Dumfriesshire. ... A. B. Simpson Albert Benjamin Simpson (December 15, 1843 – October 29, 1919) was a Canadian preacher, theologian, author, and founder of The Christian and Missionary Alliance (C&MA), an evangelical protestant denomination with an emphasis on global evangelism. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Early history

Maria Woodworth-Etter (1844–1924) was a famous evangelist in the founding years of the Assemblies of God. ... Jan. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Smith Wigglesworth (1859 - 1947), was a British religious figure and an important figure in the early history of Pentecostalism. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Fox Parham Charles Fox Parham (4 June 1873 - c. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Joseph Seymour (May 2, 1870 - September 28, 1922) was an African American minister, and an initiator of the Pentecostal religious movement. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Azusa Street Revival was a Pentecostal revival meeting that took place in Los Angeles, California and was led by William J. Seymour, an African American preacher. ... George Jeffreys (1889–1962) was a Welsh minister who founded the Elim Pentecostal Church, one of the first Pentecostal organisations. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Elim Pentecostal Church (EPC) is a U.K.-based Pentecostal Christian denomination (not to be confused with the U.S.-based Elim Fellowship). ... The Bible-Pattern Church Fellowship was founded in 1939 by George Jeffreys (1889–1972), a Welsh minister who, together with his brother Stephen Jeffreys, in 1915 had founded the Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance, one of the first Pentecostal organisations in Britain. ... Aimee Stewart she was also the founder of the Foursquare Church. ... Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Christ Apostolic Church is distinctly an African Indigenous Church (AIC). ... David du Plessis (* 1905, + January 31, 1987) was a Pentecostal minister (most of his life affiliated with Assemblies of God), who is considered to be one of the founders of the Charismatic movement. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Kathryn Johanna Kuhlman (May 9, 1907 - February 20, 1976) was a 20th Century American faith healer. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Marrion Branham (April 6, 1909, Kentucky – December 24, 1965) was an influential Bible minister sometimes credited with founding the Latter Rain Movement within American Pentecostal churches, elements of which are present in most modern Pentecostal and Charismatic churches (although William Branham denied any specific connection with the movement). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Jack Coe (March 11, 1918 – December 16, 1956) was one of the first tent evangelists of the post World War Two. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Young C.H. Mason Elder Mason was converted in November, 1878, and baptized by his brother, I. S. Nelson, a Baptist Preacher, who was pastoring the Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church near Plumerville, Arkansas. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A. A. Allen (March 27, 1911 - June 11, 1970) was born Asa A. Allen at Sulphur Rock, Arkansas. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Oral Roberts, the Christian televangelist. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Starting in Akron, Ohio, Rex Humbard was one of the first evangelists (1952) to build a ministry that incorporated radio and television programming. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Theologians

Pentecostal theologians are listed in the article Renewal Theologians. Renewal theologians are those theologians who represent the Pentecostal, Charismatic and Neocharismatic movements. ...


See also

The Alliance of Renewal Churches (ARC) is a group of Charismatic/Pentecostal Christians with a Lutheran family of origin. ... The Apostolic Church is a Pentecostal Christian denomination which can trace its origins back to the 1904-1905 Welsh Revival. ... The Apostolic Faith Mission of Portland, Oregon, United States was founded in 1906 by Florence L. Crawford, after she received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California. ... The Bible-Pattern Church Fellowship was founded in 1939 by George Jeffreys (1889–1972), a Welsh minister who, together with his brother Stephen Jeffreys, in 1915 had founded the Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance, one of the first Pentecostal organisations in Britain. ... British Israelism (sometimes called Anglo-Israelism) is a Christian theology based on the premise that many early British people, Europeans and/or their royal families were direct lineal descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel and in some cases of the Tribe of Judah. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The charismatic movement began... The Christ Apostolic Church is distinctly an African Indigenous Church (AIC). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Christian... Christian views of women vary considerably today and have varied even more throughout the last two millennia, evolving along with or counter to the societies in which Christians have lived. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... The Elim Pentecostal Church (EPC) is a U.K.-based Pentecostal Christian denomination (not to be confused with the U.S.-based Elim Fellowship). ... The Free Apostolic Church of Pentecost is a Greek pentecostal church founded by Dr. Leonidas Feggos in 1965, and now counting more than 140 churches, 200 assemblies and over than 20,000 believers spread in Greece, and also in Cyprus, Albania, Bulgaria, Germany, Belgium, Slovakia, United Kingdom, U.S.A... The Full Gospel movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit and in that God wills for his children to be prosperous in all areas of their lives: Spiritual - John 3:3,11; 2 Corinthians 5:17-21; Romans 10:9-10. ... A thatched village church in Zambia. ... List of Christian denominations (or Denominations self-identified as Christian) ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... Montanism was an early Christian sectarian movement of the mid-2nd century A.D., named after its founder Montanus. ... Neocharismatic is a reference to those Christians who have received Pentecostal-like experiences, yet they claim no association with either the Pentecostal or Charismatic movements. ... Nicky Cruz (b. ... Oneness Pentecostalism is a movement of Pentecostal Christianity that teaches the atoning death of Jesus Christ, His resurrection, His soon return, and the inerrancy of the word of God. ... The Pentacostal Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, also known as the PLDS Church, is a sect of Mormonism organized in 1994-1995 by a study group called the LDS Scripture Readers, led by Michael Bethel, composed initially of independent Mormons and members of various Mormon sects. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Charismatic Church of God is... The Pentecostal World Conference or Pentecostal World Fellowship is a fellowship of Pentecostal believers and denominations from across the world. ... For the Potters house church pastored by T.D. Jakes, see T.D. Jakes. ... This article is about religious pluralism. ... A series of scandals resulted in the destruction of the reputations of several famous Christian evangelists. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... Left Behind is a series of novels by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins, dealing with Christian dispensationalist End Times: pretribulation, premillennial, Christian eschatology viewpoint of the end of the world. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Church of God. ... The United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI) is a multi cultural United States based Christian organization and is headquartered in the St. ...

Notes

  1. ^ See Statement of Fundamental Truths of the Assemblies of God
  2. ^ This imperative can be found in Mark 16:15 and Matthew 28:19-20
  3. ^ Poll Says Many Pentecostals Don't Speak in Tongues: Divine healing more prominent marker, 10-country survey finds by Adelle M. Banks, on the Christianity Today website. Study by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. See the "Executive Summary"
  4. ^ World Christian Database, Asia Pacific Mission Office

The Pew Research Center is a fact tank based in Washington, D.C., that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping the USA and the world. ...

Studies

  • Paul Alexander, (2000), "An Analysis of the Emergence and Decline of Pacifism in the History of the Assemblies of God", PhD Dissertation, Baylor University.
  • Grant Wacker, (2001), Heaven Below: Early Pentecostals and American Culture, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA - An academic history of early Pentecostalism.
  • Walter Hollenweger, (1972), The Pentecostals: the charismatic movement in the churches, Augsburg Publishing House, Minneapolis, ISBN 0-8066-1210-X
  • Walter Hollenweger, , (1997), Pentecostalism : origins and developments worldwide, Peabody, Mass. : Hendrickson Publishers, ISBN 0-943575-36-2
  • Clifton, S. J., (2005), An Analysis of the Developing Ecclesiology of the Assemblies of God in Australia, PhD thesis Australian Catholic University
  • Matthew Steel, (2005), Pentecostalism in Zambia : Power, Authority and the Overcomers, MSc Dissertation - an examination of the growth and effects of Pentecostalism on development, University of Wales
  • Pentecostalism losing its youth? [25]

Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... The University of Wales (Prifysgol Cymru in Welsh) is a federal university founded in 1893. ...

Academic - Centres and Journals

  • Journal of Pentecostal Theology is published by SAGE publications. The editorial board is comprised of members of the Church of God Theological Seminary faculty.
  • The REFLEKS journal is published by REFLEKS-Publishing in Oslo, Norway and contains scholarly Scandinavian and English articles on Pentecostalism and neo-Pentecostalism.
  • Encounter: Journal for Pentecostal Ministry is a published by the Assemblies of God Theological Seminary (AGTS)
  • The European Research Network on Global Pentecostalism (GloPent) is an initiative by three leading European Universities in Pentecostal studies networking academic research on Pentecostal and Charismatic movements.
  • Hollenweger Center for the interdisciplinary study of Pentecostal and Charismatic movements at the Free University of Amsterdam
  • Cyberjournal for Pentecostal Charismatic Research
  • Flower Pentecostal Heritage Center (Assemblies of God archives), one of the largest collections of materials documenting the global Pentecostal movement; website contains free research tools, including over 200,000 digitized pages of periodicals and online catalog with over 55,000 entries.
  • Pentecostalism
  • Lecture on "Pentecostalism"
  • Map showing Percentage of Pentecostal Population in USA by county from Valparaiso University
  • Apostolic Herald Online newsletter sharing Pentecostal and Apostolic concepts written primarily by pentecostal authors.
  • Pentecostal Conference of the North American Keralites
  • Australasian Pentecostal Studies journal
  • Pew Religious Forum Pentecostal Hub
  • Some statistic
  • [26]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pentecostalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3604 words)
Pentecostals believe that one must be saved by believing in Jesus as Lord and Saviour for the forgiveness of sins and to be made acceptable to God.
Pentecostals believe that there are three different types of instances of speaking in tongues: One, being tongues spoken as initial evidence of the baptism of the Holy Spirit; two, being a prayer language developed in daily prayer with God; and three, being tongues and interpretation ("public utterances").
Pentecostalism is sometimes referred to as the "third force of Christianity." The largest Christian church in the world is the Yoido Full Gospel Church in South Korea, a Pentecostal church.
Oral Roberts University - Library (3628 words)
The first Pentecostal churches in the world were produced by the holiness movement prior to 1901 and, after becoming Pentecostal, retained most of their perfectionistic teachings.
The first "Pentecostals" in the modern sense appeared on the scene in 1901 in the city of Topeka, Kansas in a Bible school conducted by Charles Fox Parham, a holiness teacher and former Methodist pastor.
The final phase was the penetration of Pentecostalism into the mainline Protestant and Catholic churches as "charismatic renewal" movements with the aim of renewing and reviving the historic churches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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