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In the Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ...

Contents


Transportation

Broomsticks

Broomsticks are used for transportation by wizards and witches of all ages and for the game of Quidditch. Portkeys and Floo Powder also provide transportation. Licensed wizards of age will sometimes apparate. Eastern magic-wielders are usually the only ones to use flying carpets, and their use is banned in England at least, for being too conspicuous. A broom is a cleaning tool with a stick, the broomstick. ... Quidditch is a fictional airborne ballgame played on broomsticks, a sort of magical variant of football or polo. ... In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Apparating is the most advanced means of magical travel in the fictional Harry Potter series. ...


A complete culture exists for broomsticks as exists for cars in the real world, see the list of Broomsticks in Harry Potter. // Nimbus The Nimbus broomsticks are known to be one of the best broomsticks in the book. ...


Floo Powder

Floo powder is a glittering powder used by wizards to travel and communicate using fireplaces. A fire to which Floo powder has been added will appear green. It was invented by Ignatia Wildsmith (1227-1320) and named after the passageway which leads from a fireplace to the chimney so hot gases can escape, or flue.


To use a fireplace for transport or communication the fireplace must be connected to the Floo Network. To transport from one fireplace to another, the traveller stands in the fireplace with a handful of Floo powder, states their intended destination in a clear voice, then throws the powder at their feet. Alternatively, floo powder can be thrown into a fireplace (with or without a fire already burning) and then the traveller can step into it. As for communication, one puts ones head in the fire, and speaks the destination. This allows people to communicate without having to travel to the location.


In the second book the Weasleys traveled to Diagon Alley by Floo powder. Harry did not say "Diagon Alley" clearly (the fire thought he said "diagonally", so he came out diagonally) and was deposited in a dingy and sinister shop in nearby Knockturn Alley); in the fourth book, Arthur Weasley used his position at the Ministry of Magic to have the Dursleys' fireplace temporarily connected to the Floo network, unaware that the fireplace had been bricked up, and Sirius used the network to communicate with Harry in the same book. In the fifth book, Dolores Umbridge and her Inquisitorial Squad inspected the incoming and outgoing Owl Post and every fireplace in Hogwarts except for Dolores Umbridge's own fire, so Harry had to put himself in considerable risk and use Umbridge's fireplace whenever he wanted to communicate with Sirius at headquarters, a method which was quite uncomfortable to begin with. The fictional Weasley family figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of fantasy novels, as Ron Weasley is Harrys best friend. ... In J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fiction novels and their filmed adaptations, Diagon Alley is a large alleyway in London accessible to witches and wizards but hidden from Muggles. ... Knockturn Alley, a pun on nocturnally, is a fictional location in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... Arthur Weasley (born February 6, c. ... It has been suggested that Map of Ministry of Magic, London be merged into this article or section. ... The Dursleys are a fictional family who live in Little Whinging, Surrey, UK. They are the only remaining family of Harry Potter, whom they despise. ... Sirius Black (c. ... Dolores Jane Umbridge is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J.K. Rowling. ... The Inquistorial Squad is a fictional organization in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter series. ... Dolores Jane Umbridge is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J.K. Rowling. ...


Flying Carpets

Flying carpets are an alternative wizarding type of transportation, possibly around the world, but illegal in Europe (or at least in England). Usually they are a thick rug, frequently highly patterned and often manufactured in the Middle East. The obvious advantage of the carpet over the broomstick is that they can seat a number of people, and are no doubt more comfortable to ride. A magic carpet is a carpet that would transport persons who were on it instantaneously or quickly to their destination. ... World map showing location of Europe Europe is geologically and geographically a peninsula, forming the westernmost part of Eurasia. ... A rug can be: a carpet with a finished edge, particularly one that can be moved slang for a toupee a rug is a garment made by humans to protect their pets from the elements, as in a horse rug or dog coat RUG, short for Rijksuniversiteit Groningen or The... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ...


Flying Carpets were once an accepted form of travel for the magical community, but they are now banned due to being defined as a Muggle Artifact by the Registry of Proscribed Charmable Objects. It is therefore now against wizarding law to charm carpets or fly them in Britain, although they are still legal in other countries. Arthur Weasley was very much involved in the introduction of this legislation due to his position in the Misuse of Muggle Artifacts office. It is known that the ban was relatively recent, not only from Arthur's involvement, but also from the fact that Barty Crouch Snr's grandfather owned a 12-seater Axminster back in the days before they were prohibited. Bartemius Barty Crouch Senior(born December 29, 1933-c. ... Arms of Axminster Town Council Axminster is a small market town on the eastern border of Devon, England. ...


A merchant by the name of Ali Bashir is very keen to export Flying Carpets to Britain and is very upset that local laws are preventing him from doing so. He regularly berates Arthur about the subject but it is very unlikely that the law will be changed.


Portkey

Portkeys are first mentioned in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Once created, they can be set to transport anybody who touches them to a designated location, or to become active at a pre-determined time and transport to that location anybody who happens to be touching it at the moment. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ...


In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Barty Crouch Jr., who was masquerading as Alastor Moody, made the Triwizard Tournament cup into a portkey so it would transport anybody who touched it straight to the hands of Voldemort, expecting it would be Harry Potter. However, Harry took the cup together with Cedric Diggory, so Voldemort had Cedric unceremoniously murdered with Avada Kedavra. Alastor Mad-Eye Moody is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books, an ex-Auror working for the Order of the Phoenix. ... The Champions of the 1994 Triwizard Tournament The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Cedric Diggory, a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels, was the Hufflepuff Quidditch captain and Seeker through Harrys third year of school. ... In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels, many spells are used by the characters. ...


It has been noted by some fans that it is interesting that the simplicity with which portkeys are created in the beginning of the fourth book (as a method for transportation to the Quidditch tournament) and in the fifth book calls into question the need for the fourth book: Crouch, posing as Moody, could easily have turned, say, a book, into a portkey, called Harry into his office, and said, "Here, take this." This would have eliminated the need for Moody's laboriously guiding Harry through the tournament tasks, turning the trophy in the labyrinth into a portkey, and for 600-plus pages of dense (albeit interesting) reading. It has been argued by others, though, that due to the protection of Hogwarts, which also makes apparating impossible, the creation of portkeys on Hogwarts must have the permission of the Headmaster. This is why Moody cast the portkey spell on the Tri-Wizard Cup since, it was originally intended as a portkey all along by the tournament officials for the winner of the cup to exit the maze without having to fight past the other champions and challenges of the maze again. It would explain why the portkey took Harry back to Hogwarts and out of the maze when he touched the Cup the second time instead of back into the maze at Hogwarts (or not functioned at all like regular one time portkeys). Other evidence to support this theory may be found in the fifth Harry Potter book, including Fudge's anger at Dumbledore setting up an "Unauthorized Portkey", and the quote from Lupin: "...it's more than our life's worth to set up an unauthorized Portkey." Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ...


Time-Turner

As the name suggests, a Time-Turner is a device capable of time travel. Hermione received one from Professor McGonagall in the third book so she could attend more classes than time would allow. Since McGonagall made her swear to not tell anyone about it, she didn't mention it to Harry or Ron until the end of the book, where she and Harry used her Time-Turner to travel back in time and save Sirius Black (and Buckbeak) from certain doom. Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Spoiler warning: Minerva McGonagall (born October 4, ca. ... Sirius Black (c. ...


The confusions of time travel were such that Hermione chose to drop a few subjects at the end of the book, so she could have a normal schedule again. Though Time-Turners were briefly seen in the Department of Mysteries in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, time travel has not had a major role in any other book. It has been suggested that Map of Ministry of Magic, London be merged into this article or section. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ...


Hermione's Time-Turner resembled an hourglass on a necklace. The number of times one turns the hourglass corresponds to the number of hours one travels back in time. It is presumed there are probably other Time-Turners that allow one to travel by different intervals and/or into the future. Harry Potter seems to be a type 1 universe, as Harry and Hermione's experience in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban features a predestination paradox. Hourglass Wooden hourglass An hourglass, also known as a sandglass or sand timer, is a device for the measurement of time. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ... A predestination paradox, also called a causal loop or causality loop, is a paradox of time travel that is often used as a convention in science fiction. ...


It was revealed in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that the entire supply of Time Turners had been destroyed. It is unknown when or if the Ministry of Magic will replace them, or if it is even possible to. Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... It has been suggested that Map of Ministry of Magic, London be merged into this article or section. ...


Letters and signs

The Dark Mark

The Dark Mark is Lord Voldemort's symbol, and at the height of his power, it was sent up in the air when any one of his followers murdered someone. The Mark is also magically imprinted onto the Death Eaters' left forearms. It consists of a skull with a serpent in its mouth. According to Snape, the Dark Mark can be triggered by Voldemort to glow and burn; this is intended to serve as a summons for the Death Eaters. It is cast by placing the tip of one's staff or wand against the target's forearm or the air, and incanting the word "morsmordre." The back cover of the American edition of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince depicting the Dark Mark The Dark Mark, in the Harry Potter book series, is the symbol of Lord Voldemort and the Death Eaters. ... Lord Voldemort (born December 31, 1926) is a fictional character and the archvillain in the Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... For symbolic or mythic uses of the human skull, see Skull (symbolism) A Hippopotamuss skull A skull, or cranium, is a bony structure of vertebrates which serves as the general framework for a head. ... Serpent is a word of Latin origin (serpens, serpentis) that is normally substituted for snake in a specifically mythic or religious context, in order to distinguish such creatures from the field of biology. ... Spoiler warning: Severus Snape (born January 9, circa 1960) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


Letters

Witches and wizards can write words in the air with their wands.


Dumbledore writes the lyrics to the Hogwarts school song in the air in the first novel. Tom Riddle, at the end of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, does this to show that I am Lord Voldemort is an anagram of Tom Marvolo Riddle. Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter series. ... Tom Marvolo Riddle (born 31 December 1926) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lord Voldemort (born December 31, 1926) is a fictional character and the archvillain in the Harry Potter series. ... An anagram (Greek ana- = back or again, and graphein = to write) is the result of permuting the letters of a word or words in such a manner as to produce other words that possess linguistic meaning. ...


Potions

Potions are brewed in a cauldron from magical ingredients. This results in liquids that can be made to have any kind of effect on the drinker from strength enhancement to immunity to flames. According to Snape, potions can "bewitch the mind, ensnare the senses and even put a stopper in death". Potion-making skills are not dependent on the maker's overall magic skills, as the potions result from the properties and right proportions of the ingredients. A cauldron (from Latin caldarium, hot bath) is a large metal-made pot (kettle) for cooking and/or boiling over an open fire, usually attached to a hanger with the shape of an arc. ... Spoiler warning: Severus Snape (born January 9, circa 1960) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


Draught of Living Death

The Draught of Living Death is made by mixing a root of Asphodel and an infusion of Wormwood. It brings upon its drinker a very powerful sleep that can last indefinitely, hence its name. Flower and fruits The asphodel (Asphodelus ramosus, Liliaceae) is the flower said to fill the plains of Hades. ... Species See text Artemisia is a large, diverse genus of plant with about 180 species belonging to the Sunflower family Asteraceae. ...


Veritaserum

Veritaserum has properties similar to a truth drug. Three drops can force the drinker to spill his innermost secrets. It can be resisted through various methods, including occlumency. The name comes from the Latin veritas ("truth") plus serum. Characters in the series to use it (or believe they are using it, in the case of Umbridge- Professor Snape is believed to have given her a fake potion) include Dolores Umbridge (who tries to get Harry to tell her where Sirius Black is) and Albus Dumbledore (who uses it to interrogate Barty Crouch Jr, who was at the time disguised as Alastor Moody). A truth drug (or truth serum) is a drug used for the purposes of obtaining accurate information from an unwilling subject, most often by a police, intelligence, or military organization on a prisoner. ... Occlumency is, in the fictional realm of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series, a branch of magic involving the practice of closing ones mind against external penetration, with the intent of preventing others from reading ones thoughts. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


Polyjuice Potion

Polyjuice Potion is used to transform a person into the physical form of another person for one hour. The final ingredient in this potion is a piece (typically a hair) of the person that the potion-taker will transform into. The potion cannot controllably be used to transform into a non-human animal (that ability can only be learned through hard study of transfigurations; contamination of the Polyjuice Potion may cause partial, uncontrollable animal transformations). The name is a portmanteau of polymorph (a well-known Dungeons & Dragons spell with similar effects) and juice (indicating that it is indeed a liquid). A female with brown hair. ... The original Dungeons & Dragons set Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D or DnD) is a fantasy role-playing game (RPG) published by Gary Gygax and David Arneson in January 1974. ...


The potion has played a part on three occasions:

  • First, Harry, Ron and Hermione brewed this potion in the second book in order to assume the appearances of three Slytherins so they could sneak into the Slytherin Common Room and find out whether Draco Malfoy was the heir of Slytherin.
  • Barty Crouch Jr. used Polyjuice Potion in very large quantities in the fourth book in order to pose as Alastor Moody.
  • Draco had his cronies, Crabbe and Goyle, use the potion so they could act as his undercover sentries in the sixth book. Very much to their chagrin, the most effective disguise for a hulking adolescent male student is that of a small preteen girl.

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter series. ... Draco Malfoy (born June 5, 1980)1 is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter books. ... For other uses, see inheritance (disambiguation). ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Junior is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Alastor Mad-Eye Moody is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books, an ex-Auror working for the Order of the Phoenix. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gregory Goyle. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Vincent Crabbe. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... A separate article is about the punk band called The Adolescents. ... young girl A girl is a female human child, as contrasted to a male child, which is a boy. ...

Wolfsbane Potion

Wolfsbane Potion is a recently (around 1990) invented potion that, if taken during the week leading up to the full moon, allows werewolves to retain his or her mindset and sanity, when he/she transforms into a werewolf during the full-moon. It is described as a foul-tasting potion - sugar makes it useless - and is so difficult to make that Severus Snape was the only member of the Hogwarts staff capable of preparing the potion for Remus Lupin, who required regular doses to control himself when he transformed into a werewolf.


Felix Felicis

Felix Felicis is a potion that makes the user incredibly lucky, apparently by giving them an intuition of what to do rather than by affecting the world. It is very complicated to make, requiring at least six months, and is the color of molten gold. This potion was first seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, in which Harry won a vial of the brew by winning a contest in Potions class. Used in excess, it can be dangerously addictive and sometimes fatally toxic. Felix Felicis is a potion in the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince that grants temporary good luck to the drinker. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ...


Minor potions

  • A potion is used by Harry to get past the flames in the first book to get to the Stone.
  • Age Potion: Causes the drinker to age, whether the potion only provides the signs of ageing or actually ages the drinker is not clear. A few drops ages the drinker a couple of months. The potion does not work against magical age detectors when these are properly established, e.g. Dumbledore's age line in the fourth book.
  • Amortentia: Widely regarded as the most powerful love potion in the world, it has a mother-of-pearl sheen and was first seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. However, it should be noted that this potion creates extreme romantic obsession rather than true love, the latter being impossible to recreate artificially. It is said that Amortentia smells differently to each person, mimicking that which is most attractive to that person.
  • Draught of Peace: Gives the drinker a feeling of peace and well-being, but if overdone it can put the drinker into a deep or even irreversible sleep. It is a very difficult potion to make. Often used in the lead-up to the OWL and NEWT exams to help over-distressed students.
  • An Elixir to Induce Euphoria: This sunshine-yellow potion makes the drinker very happy. This potion was first seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
  • Hiccoughing Solution: Cures hiccups. First seen in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
  • Shrinking Solution: Causes the drinker to reverse age. First seen in Prisonor of Azkaban; Professor Snape tests Neville's solution on Trevor; Trevor becomes a tadpole.
  • Skele-gro: A potion that grows back bones. Appeared in second book
  • Sleeping Drought: Used in the second book to subdue Crabbe and Goyle (so Harry and Ron could steal their hair and shoes)
  • Strengthening Solution: Physically strengthens the drinker. First seen in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Love potion can refer to many things. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ...

Prank Objects

Weasleys' Wizard Wheezes

Headless Hat 
Creates a limited field of invisibility, specifically, the wearer's head.
Extendable Ears 
Placing one end of one of these long, flesh-colored strings in one's ear allows them to hear anything at the other end. Used for spying in many instances.
Skiving Snackbox 
These hold a variety of candies that, when eaten, cause the subject to show symptoms of some sort of illness, such as vomiting or nosebleed. Used for getting out of tests. The candies have two halves, the second one is an antidote.

Includes:

  1. Fainting Fancy
  2. Fever Fudge
  3. Nosebleed Nougat
  4. Puking Pastilles
  5. Ton Tongue Toffees
Canary Creams 
Transfigures the user into a canary
Wildfire Whiz-Bangs 
Fireworks.

Includes:

  1. Basic Blaze Box
  2. Deflagration Deluxe
Portable Swamp 
Creates a swamp when used.
Darkness Powder 
When sprinkled into the air, creates an area of impenetrable darkness.
Shield Hats 
Automatically cast a Shield Charm on the wearer, causing minor to moderate curses and jinxes to be reflected back at the caster. Come in other shapes as well, such as Shield Cloaks and Shield Gloves.
Decoy Detonators 
Small horn-type object that, when dropped on the ground, will scurry away a distance and make a loud distracting noise.

Other

Dungbomb 
Explodes into a large and extremely smelly mess.
Stink Pellets 
Used to distract prefects and teachers, and gives an unpleasant smell.
Fanged Frisbee 
Frisbee that, when thrown, flies about on its own power and will bite at things it comes across.

Other Magical Objects

It has been suggested that Chocolate Frog (Harry Potter) be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)

Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... Chocolate frogs are delicacies in the Harry Potter universe. ...

James' and Sirius' Detention Mirrors

In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Sirius gives Harry a mirror he originally used to communicate with James in detention. Harry does not open it until Sirius's death, only to find that it no longer works. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ...


Howler

A Howler is a bright red letter usually signifying displeasure and/or anger from the sender directed at the recipient. When opened, the Howler begins to yell in the sender's voice at the recipient, eventually dissolving into scraps of paper. If not opened, it will explode and scream even louder. In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Mrs. Weasley sent Ron a Howler after he stole his dad's enchanted car and flew it to Hogwarts with Harry. In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Dumbledore sent Petunia Dursley a howler to remind her of her agreement to let Harry live at Privet Drive after the dementor attack when Harry's Uncle Vernon was ready to throw him out. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Molly Weasley, née Prewett (born October 30, c. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter series. ... Harry James Potter (born July 31, 1980)[1] the only son of James Potter and Lily Potter; is a fictional character and the protagonist of a series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ... A dementor is an utterly foul fictional being, the worst creature J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter book series has to offer (so far), not counting certain humans. ...


Horcruxes

See Horcrux. A horcrux is a magical object in the Harry Potter series of fictional books, first introduced in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ...


Invisibility Cloak

The invisibility cloak makes its wearer invisible. Harry Potter inherited one from his father and uses it throughout the books in order to sneak around the school. The cloak is large enough for Ron and Hermione to accompany him underneath it, although this becomes more difficult as they approach full growth. This article needs cleanup. ... Ronald Ron Bilius Weasley (born March 1, 1980) is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of childrens books. ... Hermione Jane Granger (born September 19, 1979) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. ...


Invisibility cloaks are very rare and expensive, and they are made from the pelts of Demiguises, magical herbivore beasts that are found in the Far East. Magical creatures comprise a colourful and integral aspect of the magical world in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. ... Far East is a term often used for East Asia and Southeast Asia combined, sometimes including also the easternmost territories of Russia, i. ...


The Marauder's Map

The Marauder's Map was created by Remus Lupin, Peter Pettigrew, Sirius Black, and James Potter as an aid in mischief-making. They gained extensive knowledge of the Hogwarts grounds from their frequent night-time adventures while transformed as animals (Black, Pettigrew and Potter being Animagi and Lupin a werewolf). They used this knowledge to create the Marauder's Map. The map bears the names of its creators as they knew each other — by their nicknames (which are derived from the animal they transform into): Moony (Lupin, a werewolf), Wormtail (Pettigrew, a rat), Padfoot (Black, a dog), and Prongs (Potter, a stag). Remus John Lupin (born March 10, 1959 or 1960) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter novels, portrayed by David Thewlis in the films. ... Peter Pettigrew is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Sirius Black (c. ... Geraldine Somerville as Lily Potter, Adrian Rawlins as James Potter, and one of the Saunders triplets as one-year-old Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone In the Harry Potter series, James and Lily Potter are the late parents of Harry Potter. ... Registered Animagus Minerva McGonagall In the Harry Potter books, an Animagus is a wizard or witch capable of turning into an animal and back at will. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... A German Woodcut from 1722 A werewolf in folklore and mythology is a person who changes into a wolf, either by purposefully using magic or by being placed under a curse. ... Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris (Linnaeus, 1758) The Dog is a canine carnivorous mammal that has been domesticated for at least 14,000 years and perhaps for as long as 150,000 years based on recent evidence. ... Genera About 15 in 4 subfamilies. ...


At first glance, the map is simply a piece of blank parchment; but when the user says, "I solemnly swear that I am up to no good," ink lines stretch across it, revealing a map of Hogwarts (including secret passageways) and the location of everyone within the grounds. The map also gives information on how to open secret passageways. The words "Mischief managed!" return the map to its original blank state (to prevent someone who does not know the secret of the map from using it). Parchment is a material for the pages of a book or codex, made from fine calf skin, sheep skin or goat skin. ...


The map was given to Harry by Fred and George Weasley, who found it while unattended in Filch's office. It made its first appearance in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and has featured in all subsequent novels thus far. Fred and George Weasley (both born April 1, 1978)[1][2] are fictional characters in the Harry Potter series of novels, created by J. K. Rowling. ... Fred and George Weasley (both born April 1, 1978)[1][2] are fictional characters in the Harry Potter series of novels, created by J. K. Rowling. ... Argus Filch is the caretaker and (effectively) hall monitor in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of books. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ...


In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Professor Snape finds the map in Harry's possession and tries to force it to reveal its secrets; the map responds by insulting him. That this happens is unsurprising, as the map's creators (Moony, Wormtail, Padfoot, and Prongs) detested Snape when they were boys. Professor Lupin shows up and says that he will investigate and takes it with him. He later gives it back to Harry. The Map retains an echo of its creators' personalities, much like the Sorting Hat remembers the thoughts and opinions of the school founders. Snape, however, continues to insist that the map contains dark magic, most likely because he recognised the nicknames of his old schooltime rivals on the heading. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ... Spoiler warning: Severus Snape (born January 9, circa 1960) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Harry is a common first name in the English-speaking world. ... In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ...


The Mirror of Erised

The Mirror of Erised is a mystical mirror that Harry discovers in one of the back corridors of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. On it is inscribed, erised stra ehru oyt ube cafru oyt on wohsiI show not your face but your heart's desire, written backwards. According to Dumbledore, the Mirror "shows us nothing more or less than the deepest, most desperate desire of our hearts". It is really the mirror of Desire. Harry sees his parents, and an entire family of Potters, standing beside him (since he wishes to have a family). Ron sees himself as Head Boy and Quidditch Captain holding the Quidditch Cup (he wishes to be acknowledged). Dumbledore says he sees himself holding a pair of socks, on the grounds that he did not receive any for Christmas. He may be telling the truth (in which case he already has everything that he desires, except for the warm socks), but he is more likely making a joke in order to hide the truth from Harry (after all, it is none of Harry's business). Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Quidditch is a fictional airborne ballgame played on broomsticks, a sort of magical variant of football or polo. ... Socks // Physical Characteristics and Uses A sock is a baglike covering for the foot and/or lower leg, which is designed to: ease chafing between the foot and footwear, keep feet warm, and absorb sweat from the feet. ...


The Mirror of Erised was the final protection given to the Philosopher's stone. Dumbledore hid the mirror and hid the stone inside it. He cast a spell that made it so only a person who wanted to find the stone, but not to use it, would be able to obtain the stone. Anyone else would see himself making an Elixir of Life or turning things to gold, rather than actually see himself find the stone. The philosophers stone, a longtime Holy Grail of Western alchemy, is a mythical substance that supposedly could turn inexpensive metals into gold and/or create an elixir that would make humans immortal. ...


Pensieve

A Pensieve is a stone basin, covered in mystic runes, with a liquid or gas within. A witch or wizard can extract his or her own memories and place them in the Pensieve, especially to relieve the mind when it becomes too flooded with information. Anyone can examine the memories in the Pensieve, which also allows viewers to fully immerse themselves in the memories stored within, much like a magical form of virtual reality. Tom Riddle's diary seems to have this same form of virtual reality. Virtual reality (abbreviated VR) describes an environment that is simulated by a computer. ... Tom Riddles diary is a fictional magical object that appears in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ...


Like many names in these books, pensieve is a pun: it is a sieve in that it is a device used for sifting out thoughts, and in using it one becomes pensive or thoughtful.


A Pensieve first appears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, again in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ... Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is the sixth novel in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ...


Photographs

Wizarding photographs are like muggle photographs, but the figures within move or even, sometimes, leave. In order for photographs to be Wizarding photographs; that is, in order for them to move, the film from a fairly ordinary camera must be developed in a certain potion. Witches and wizards also like to keep their photos in attractive albums or scrapbooks, like the one Hagrid made for Harry with photos of the Potters. Photo subjects can leave the photographs, but it's unclear whether they can travel to other photos and communicate with their surroundings as portrait subjects can. For that reason, people in photographs seem more confined to the moment than those in paintings. A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ...


Put-Outer

The Put-Outer is a device used by Albus Dumbledore to turn off the streetlights along a street at night. The Put-Outer makes two appearances: Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ...

  • In Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Dumbledore uses the Put-Outer to darken Privet Drive, where the Dursley household is located. Dumbledore is expecting Rubeus Hagrid to transport the infant Harry Potter to Privet Drive, where Dumbledore will leave him at the Dursley household. Dumbledore's Put-Outer allows Hagrid to arrive with added security, which is necessary because Harry Potter's parents had just been murdered the night before.
  • In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Dumbledore loans the Put-Outer to Mad-Eye Moody, who uses it when transporting Harry from the Dursleys' home to the headquarters of the Order of the Phoenix at #12 Grimmauld Place. The Order is a highly secret society which aims to thwart the evil Lord Voldemort. The Put-Outer again provides added security to (a) keep Harry Potter safe, as he is a highly valued target among Lord Voldemort's supporters, and (b) keep the Order's headquarters secret, because these headquarters are also a highly valued target.

Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Rubeus Hagrid (born December 6, c. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ... Alastor Mad-Eye Moody is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books, an ex-Auror working for the Order of the Phoenix. ... The Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organization in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Lord Voldemort (born December 31, 1926) is a fictional character and the archvillain in the Harry Potter series. ...

Quidditch equipment

There are several enchanted objects needed to play Quidditch, the most obvious being flying broomsticks. All the balls in the game are enchanted in some way. The Golden Snitch is enchanted to fly around and also to not leave the playing field. The Bludger is enchanted to fly around and try to knock players off their broomsticks. A Bludger does not focus on one player unless it has been tampered with, as was the case in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. The Quaffle may appear an exception, but it is also enchanted to make it easy to grip, and so it falls more slowly than normal. Quidditch is a fictional airborne ballgame played on broomsticks, a sort of magical variant of football or polo. ... Quidditch is a fictional airborne ballgame (played on broomsticks), a sort of magical variant of football or polo. ... Bludger is a derogatory Australian slang term for a lazy individual, particularly one who is perceived to receive undeserved welfare or material benefits. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Quidditch is a fictional airborne ballgame (played on broomsticks), a sort of magical variant of football or polo. ...


Remembrall

A Remembrall is a small, clear orb that turns red if its user has forgotten something. Unfortunately, it does not tell the user what he/she has forgotten. The very forgetful Neville Longbottom is given a Remembrall in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, but subsequently loses it soon after. Neville Longbottom (born July 30, 1980)[1] is a fictional character in the Harry Potter books by J. K. Rowling. ... Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ...


The DVD of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone contained a software approximation of a remembrall. DVD is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for storing data, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ...


See also: Personal Digital Assistant. Palm IIIxe PDA Personal digital assistants (PDAs or palmtops) are handheld devices that were originally designed as personal organizers, but became much more versatile over the years. ...


The Sorting Hat

The Sorting Hat is a sentient artifact used at Hogwarts which magically determines to which of the four school houses — Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw or Slytherin — a new student is to be assigned. As the First-Year students' names are read aloud alphabetically at the year's opening banquet, the hat is placed on each student's head in turn, and after a few moments' deliberation it announces its choice. Occasionally, the hat will allow a student's request to influence its decision, as when Harry requested not to be placed in Slytherin. The Sorting Hat was originally the hat of Godric Gryffindor, and may or may not be one of Lord Voldemort's Horcruxes. Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter series. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... A horcrux is a magical object in the Harry Potter series of fictional books, first introduced in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ...


Before sorting the students each year, the hat recites a new introductory song. These songs occasionally warn of danger to come, as in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Sorting Hat Songs The Sorting Hat is a sentient artifact used at Hogwarts which magically determines to which of the four school houses — Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw or Slytherin — a new student is to be assigned. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2003 book, the fifth book in the Harry Potter series of childrens books by J. K. Rowling. ...


In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the hat plays a critical role in the climax of the story by coming to Harry's aid in the Chamber and providing him with Godric Gryffindor's sword. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In the movie versions of the novels the hat is voiced by Leslie Phillips. Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Leslie Phillips OBE (born April 20, 1924) is a British comedy actor, born in Tottenham, London. ...


Spellotape

Spellotape is magical adhesive tape; it is a spoof of the real life product sellotape. Look up Magic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Magic is any unexplained process (contrast this with technology). ... Adhesive tape is an adhesive-coated fastening tape used for temporary or, in some cases, permanent joining. ... A spoof is a humorous take on an established idea, cultural movement, television program, movie, play, or book. ... Sellotape is Europes best-known brand of transparent, cellulose-based, pressure-sensitive adhesive tape. ...


Spellotape is referenced in all of the Harry Potter books, apart from Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone and features in the movie Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Starring Daniel Radcliffe Rupert Grint Emma Watson Produced by David Heyman Distributed by Warner Brothers Release date November 15, 2002 Runtime 161 min. ...


Tom Riddle's diary

See: Tom Riddle's diary. Tom Riddles diary is a fictional magical object that appears in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ...


Wand

To perform feats of magic a wand is usually used. Without a wand magic is possible, but this seems to be very difficult. A wand is personal for a wizard, although other wizards' wands can be used. When Harry Potter was selecting his wand, he had to try out a lot of wands until he found a wand that created sparks as he waved it. A wand is usually made of wood and has a core of an organic, magical object or substance. Such cores mentioned include phoenix tail feathers, unicorn tail hairs, dragon heartstrings and veela hair. Wands with cores from the same source give strange effects (Priori Incantatem) when forced to fight each other, as is the case with Harry Potter's and Lord Voldemort's wands in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Each of their wands contains a tail feather from Fawkes, the phoenix belonging to Albus Dumbledore. A wand consists of a thin, straight, hand-held stick of wood, ivory, or metal, approximately 30 cm (a foot) long and up to 25 mm (an inch) in circumference. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... The gentle and pensive virgin has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 The unicorn is a legendary creature shaped like a horse, but slender and with a single — usually spiral — horn growing out of its forehead. ... Chinese dragon, colour engraving on wood, Japanese Chinese school, 19th Century A dragon, typically depicted as a large and powerful reptile or serpent with magical or spiritual qualities, is one of the few, if not the only mythological creature to be known around the globe. ... Fairies in Slavic mythology come in several forms and their names are spelled differently based on the specific language. ... Priori Incantatem is a spell effect from the Harry Potter series. ... Lord Voldemort (born December 31, 1926) is a fictional character and the archvillain in the Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Fawkes is Albus Dumbledores pet. ... Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ...


See also: List of Harry Potter Wands. Wands Wands are made from various woods with a powerful magical substance at the core. ...


Wizard's Chess

Wizard's Chess is a version of chess played with small pieces and a board like real chess, except that the pieces are alive. In the closing chapters of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Harry, Ron and Hermione are involved in a life size game of wizard's chess. Many countries claim to have invented the chess game in some incipient form. ... Cover of the International edition, distributed in the United Kingdom, Australia, India and Canada Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books for children written by British author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
PENSIEVE (6059 words)
PENSIEVE is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.
I noticed Desert Flutie, a first-time visitor to PENSIEVE, had this blog quiz up on her page when I popped in to thank her for her kind words.
This morning I opened email and in the midst of reading Pensieve comments (thanks to those of you who kept my blog from getting lonely!), discovered I had not only been nominated for an award, but I was also a finalist!
Magical objects in Harry Potter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4297 words)
A Pensieve is a stone basin, covered in mystic runes, with a liquid or gas within.
Like many names in these books, pensieve is a pun: it is a sieve in that it is a device used for sifting out thoughts, and in using it one becomes pensive or thoughtful.
A Pensieve first appears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, again in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
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