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Encyclopedia > Penobscot
Seal of the Penobscot Indian Nation of Maine
Seal of the Penobscot Indian Nation of Maine

The Penobscot are a sovereign people indigenous to what is now Maritime Canada and the northeastern United States, particularly Maine. They were and are significant participants in the historical and present Wabanaki Confederacy, along with the Passamaquoddy, Maliseet and Mi'kmaq nations. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3387x2500, 1508 KB) The seal of the Penobscot Tribal Nation of Maine. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3387x2500, 1508 KB) The seal of the Penobscot Tribal Nation of Maine. ... Several places in the United States are named after the Native American Penobscot people: Penobscot, Maine Penobscot County, Maine Penobscot Indian Island Reservation, Penobscot County, Maine Penobscot River This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Maritimes or Maritime provinces are a region of Canada on the Atlantic coast, consisting of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. ... Map of the US northeast. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The Waponahkiyik, known in English as the Wabanaki Confederacy, is a historical confederacy located in the Wabanaki (Dawnland) area, now called New England (particularly Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire) and the Canadian Maritimes (particularly Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. ... Passamaquoddy Territory The Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati or Pestomuhkati in the Passamaquoddy language) are a Native American/First Nations people who live in northeastern North America, primarily in Maine and New Brunswick. ... The Maliseet (also known as Wolastoqiyik and Malecite and in French also as Malécites or Étchemins (the latter collectively referring to the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy)) are a Native American/First Nations people who inhabit the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, roughly overlapping the International Boundary between New... The Mikmaq The Mikmaq (; (also spelled Míkmaq, Migmaq, Miqmac, or priorly Micmac) are a First Nations or Native American people, indigenous to northeastern New England, Canadas Atlantic Provinces, and the Gaspé Peninsula of Quebec. ...


The word "Penobscot" originates from a mispronunciation of their name "Penawapskewi." The word means "rocky part" or "descending ledges" and originally referred to the portion of the Penobscot River between Old Town and Bangor. The tribe has adopted the name Penobscot Indian Nation. Panorama of the Penobscot River in Millinocket, Maine. ... Main Street in Old Town Old Town is a city in Penobscot County, Maine, United States. ... For other places with the same name, see Bangor. ... http://www. ...


Penobscot is also the name of the dialect of Eastern Abenaki (an Algonquian language) that the Penobscot people speak. Abenaki (also Abnaki) is the cover term for a complex of dialects of one of the Eastern Algonquian languages, originally spoken in what is now Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. ... The Algonquian (also Algonkian) languages are a subfamily of Native American languages that includes most of the languages in the Algic language family (others are Wiyot and Yurok of northwestern California). ...

Contents

History

Historical territories of Eastern Abenaki tribes
Historical territories of Eastern Abenaki tribes

The Penobscot Indian Island Reservation is surrounded by the waters of the Penobscot River, in Penobscot County, Maine. This large river runs from their sacred mountain to the north, Mt. Katahdin, down through the state to Penobscot Bay. It was along this river that they made seasonal relocations to the ocean for seafood, and then back inland for moose, deer, elk and bear hunting, as weather dictated.They lived in wigwams mostly. Penobscot Indian Island Reservation is an Indian reservation located in Penobscot County, Maine, United States. ... Penobscot County is a county located in the state of Maine. ... Mount Katahdin is the highest mountain in Maine. ... Penobscot Bay originates from the mouth of Maines Penobscot River. ... Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... This article is about the species of deer. ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ...


Mount Katahdin remains a sacred place for these people, and as such travel to the top of the mountain is considered taboo. It is believed that an angry god resides in Pamola Peak. Pamola is a lower god in the spiritual belief system of the Penawapskewi. Pamola was an angry god, and because of his trickster behavior, was sent to Mt. Katahdin for eternity by the power of the highest god, Gluskab. Mount Katahdin (USGS name) is the highest mountain in Maine. ... This article is about cultural prohibitions in general, for other uses, see Taboo (disambiguation). ... The Penobscot are a sovereign people indigenous to what is now the northeastern U.S. and Maritime Canada, particularly Maine. ... After Tabaldak created humans, the dust from his hand created Gluskab and his twin brother, Malsumis. ...


These people have a prehistoric tie to the river, such that it long ago became a part of their identity. The name of their tribe is the name of a place on the river where they spent most of their time throughout the year, a place "where the white rocks are," also identified as "where the river widens."[citation needed] Prehistory (Greek words προ = before and ιστορία = history) is the period of human history prior to the advent of writing (which marks the beginning of recorded history). ... Identity is an umbrella term used throughout the social sciences for an individuals comprehension of him or herself as a discrete, separate entity. ...


The insignia of this tribe, evidenced in their art and design, is the fiddlehead, in this case an immature frond of the Ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris L.) that grows along the banks of the Penobscot River. Fiddleheads of this fern are a delicacy and are one of the first "blooms" appearing after the harsh winters of the region, thus considered a gift from a spiritual higher power: a reward for having survived the winter. Fiddlehead is a name referring either to a young fern or to the top part of immature fronds that appear curled. ... Binomial name Matteuccia struthiopteris (L.) Todaro The Ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) is a crown-forming, colony-forming fern, occurring in northern regions worldwide, and in northern/central North America. ...


This tribe became federally recognized through the Maine Land Claims Act, signed on March 15, 1980. Under the terms of the agreement, the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy tribes received a settlement of $81.5 million in return for relinquishing their rights to 19,500 square miles, for roughly 60% of the state of Maine.[1] They mostly live on a reservation at Indian Island, which is near Old Town. Federally recognized tribes are those Indian tribes recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs for certain federal government purposes. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Casino

In 1973, the Penobscot tribe was one of the first Native American tribes to begin gambling enterprises with the opening of Penobscot High Stakes Bingo which is located on the reservation. Gamble redirects here. ... // Native American gambling enterprises comprise gambling businesses operated on Indian reservations or tribal land, which have limited sovereignty and therefore the ability to exist outside of direct state regulation. ...


Notable Penobscots

  • Andrew Sockalexis, a marathon runner who competed in the 1912 Stockholm Olympics, inducted into the Maine Running Hall of Fame in 1989. [1]
  • Louis Sockalexis, the first native American in major league baseball. The Cleveland Spiders became the Cleveland Indians in honor of him.
  • Molly Spotted Elk, famous performer of the silent film era.
  • Joseph Nicolar, Penobscot Tribal Representative to Maine State Legislature and author of 1893 book "The Life and Traditions of the Red Man."
  • Charles Norman Shay, Decorated war hero of Omaha Beach, Normandy, in WWII, recipient of the French Legion of Honor medal

Louis Sockalexis Louis Sockalexis (b. ... For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... Molly Spotted Elk was the stage name of Molly Nelson Dellis, a native American actress and dancer born in 1903 in the Penobscot reservation in Maine and died in 1977. ...

See also

The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... The Maine penny is a Norwegian silver penny dating to the reign of Olaf Kyrre. ...

References

  1. ^ Maine Land Claim. Maine Indian Tribal-State Commission February 14, 1995 Hallowell, Maine. 2003 Passamaquoddy Tribe at Pleasant Point

External links

Native American Tribes officially recognized by the United States

Penobscot is one of the 561 Indian Tribal Entities within the contiguous 48 States recognized and eligible to receive services from the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs included in the latest list issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior of the United States on March 22, 2007.
  Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ... Image File history File links Biaseal. ... This is a list of the 563 Native American Tribal Entities which are recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. ... The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States within the Department of the Interior charged with the administration and management of 55. ... This is a list of the 563 Native American Tribal Entities which are recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs. ... The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the federal government of the United States within the Department of the Interior charged with the administration and management of 55. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally owned land. ... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Penobscot Indians (992 words)
Penobscot belonged, consisted of a number of small tribes of Algonquian linguistic stock, holding the greater part of the present state of
Penobscot number 425, while the rest, all of mixed blood and including the descendants of the broken and incorporated Pennacook, reside, under the name of Abnaki, in the two mission settlements of Saint Francis (335) and Bécancourt (25) in
Penobscot, who made a separate treaty of peace in 1749, thus saving themselves and their territory, but forever alienating the affection of their kinsmen by whom they were thenceforth regarded as
Native Americans: Penobscot Indian Tribe (Penobscot Nation, Penobscott, Penobscots) (871 words)
Recently the Penobscot Indians and their Passamaquoddy allies--despite formidable harassment from white neighbors--successfully argued that their treaty rights had been violated, and in 1980 received a settlement of $81 million for land that was illegally stolen from them.
The Penobscot tribe was able to buy back some of their ancestral lands, and today they are a sovereign nation working to maintain their traditions, language, and self-sufficiency.
Penobscot history is interesting and important, but the Penobscot are still here today, too, and we have tried to feature modern writers as well as traditional folklore, contemporary art as well as museum pieces, and the issues and struggles of today as well as the tragedies of yesterday.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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