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Encyclopedia > Pennsylvania State University
The Pennsylvania State University

Motto: Making Life Better
Established: 1855
Type: Land-Grant, state-related
Endowment: US $1.4 billion[1]
President: Graham Spanier
Faculty: 5,495
Students: 42,914 University Park
31,632 Commonwealth Campuses
6,569 PA College of Tech
638 Dickinson School of Law
791 Hershey Medical Center
83,721 Total
Location: State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 19 Commonwealth Campuses, and 5 Special-mission campuses
Campus: University Park Campus: 5,448 acres (22 km²). TOTAL Campuses: 18,370 acres (74 km²)
Colors: Blue and White                           
Nickname: Penn State
Mascot: Nittany Lion
Athletics: formerly Atlantic 10, now Big Ten Conference
Affiliations: MAISA; AAU
Website: www.psu.edu

The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related, land-grant university located in State College, Pennsylvania, USA. The University has 24 campuses throughout the state of Pennsylvania, including a virtual World Campus. The enrollment at the Penn State University Park campus is 42,914 with a total enrollment of over 84,000 across its 24 campuses, placing it among the ten largest public universities in the United States. Penn State offers more than 160 majors and administers a $1.4 billion (USD) endowment.[1] The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Graham B. Spanier, discussing Napster on October 18, 2003, in his university-provided residence, the Schreyer House Graham B. Spanier is president of The Pennsylvania State University that has 22 campus locations in Pennsylvania, succeeding Joab Thomas with his inaugural address on January 15, 1995. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ... A mural in the Hetzel Union Building entitled Commonwealth Campuses shows their respective locations. ... The Pennsylvania College of Technology, or Penn College, is a small university (of approximately 6000 students) located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. ... Trickett Hall The Pennsylvania State University — Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... --Boothy443 | comhrá 05:11, 17 September 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... State College is a borough located in Centre County, Pennsylvania. ... Centre County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... MAISA organizes and regulates intercollegiate sailing in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, the eastern part of West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... State college has multiple meanings. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article is about the U.S. State. ... In 1998 The Pennsylvania State University launched its 25th campus of the University, Penn State World Campus. ... USD redirects here. ...

Contents

History

Penn State was founded in February 22, 1855 by act P.L.46, No. ...

Early years

Penn State was founded as a degree-granting institution on February 22, 1855 by act P.L. 46, No. 50 of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as the Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania. Centre County became the home of the new school when James Irvin of Bellefonte donated 200 acres (0.8 km²) of land—the first of 10,101 acres (41 km²) the University would eventually acquire. In 1862, the school's name was changed to the Agricultural College of Pennsylvania, and with the passage of the Morrill Land-Grant Act, Pennsylvania selected the school in 1863 to be the state's sole land grant college. In the following years, enrollment fell as the school tried to balance purely agricultural studies with a more classic education, falling to 64 undergraduates in 1875, a year after the school's name changed once again to the Pennsylvania State College. is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Capitol Building The Pennsylvania General Assembly is the U.S. state of Pennsylvanias legislative branch, seated at the states capital, Harrisburg. ... Centre County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... James Irvin (1800 - 1862) is an American politician. ... Bellefonte is a borough in Centre County, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Morrill Act redirects here. ... Agricultural science is a broad multidisciplinary field that encompasses the parts of exact, natural, economic, and social sciences that are used in the practice and understanding of agriculture. ...


President Atherton

George W. Atherton became president of the school in 1882, and broadened the school's curriculum. Shortly after he introduced engineering studies, Penn State became one of the ten largest engineering schools in the nation.[citation needed] Atherton also expanded the liberal arts and agriculture programs, for which the school began receiving regular appropriations from the state in 1887. Atherton is widely credited with saving Penn State from bankruptcy,[citation needed] and is still honored today by the name of a major road in State College. Penn State's Atherton Hall, a well-furnished and centrally located residence hall, is named not after George Atherton himself, but after his wife, Frances Washburn Atherton. His grave is in front of Schwab Auditorium near Old Main, marked by an engraved marble block in front of his statue. George W. Atherton George Washington Atherton (June 20, 1837–July 26, 1906) was president of the Pennsylvania State University from 1882 until his death in 1906. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... This U.S. Highway article needs to be cleaned up to conform to both a higher standard of article quality and accepted design standards outlined in the WikiProject U.S. Highways. ... State College redirects here. ... Atherton Hall is a dormitory on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Old Main Old Main, originally called Main Building and first built in 1863, was the first major building of the Pennsylvania State University. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ...


Early 20th century

In the years that followed, Penn State grew significantly, becoming the state's largest grantor of baccalaureate degrees and reaching an enrollment of 5,000 in 1936. Around that time, a system of commonwealth campuses was started by President Ralph Hetzel to provide an alternative for Depression-era students who were economically unable to leave home to attend college. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 714 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 714 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Old Main Old Main, originally called Main Building and first built in 1863, was the first major building of the Pennsylvania State University. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Ralph Dorn Hetzel (December 31, 1882 — 1947) was the tenth president of the Pennsylvania State University, serving from 1927 until 1947. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Eisenhower, Walker

In 1953, President Milton Eisenhower, brother of former U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, changed the school's name to The Pennsylvania State University, and the University developed rapidly under his successor Eric A. Walker. Under Walker's leadership (1956-1970,) the University acquired hundreds of acres of surrounding land, and enrollment nearly tripled. In addition, in 1967, the Hershey Medical Center, a college of medicine and hospital, was established with a US$50 million gift from the Hershey Trust Company. Milton Stover Eisenhower (September 15, 1899 - May 2, 1985) served as president of three major American universities. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Eric Arthur Walker born April 29, 1910 in Long Eaton, England, died February 17, 1995 was president of Penn State University from 1956 to 1970 and founding member of the National Academy of Engineering[1]. Dr. Walker earned a Bachelors Degree from Harvard University in Electrical Engineering, a Masters Degree... --Boothy443 | comhrá 05:11, 17 September 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... USD redirects here. ... Hershey Trust Company was created in 1905, as Milton S. Hershey was organizing to create the Milton Hershey School. ...


Modern era

In the 1970s, The Pennsylvania State University became a state-related institution. As such, it now belongs to the Commonwealth System of Higher Education, and is not part of the fully public Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) is the largest provider of higher education in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the 11th largest public university system in the United States. ...


In recent years, Penn State's role as a leader in education in Pennsylvania has become well-defined. In 1989, the Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport joined ranks with the University, and in 1997, so did the Dickinson School of Law. The University is now the largest in Pennsylvania, and in 2003, it was credited with having the largest impact on the state economy of any organization, generating an economic effect of over $6 billion on a budget of US$2.5 billion. To offset the lack of funding due to the limited growth in state appropriations to Penn State, the University has concentrated its efforts on philanthropy (2003 marked the end of the Grand Destiny campaign—a seven-year effort that raised over US$1.3 billion). The Pennsylvania College of Technology, or Penn College, is a small university (of approximately 6000 students) located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. ... Map of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania highlighting Williamsport Williamsport is a city in and the county seat of Lycoming County,GR6 Pennsylvania in the United States. ... Trickett Hall The Pennsylvania State University — Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... USD redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ...


Campuses and colleges

The Lion Shrine at University Park
The Lion Shrine is a gift of the class of 1940

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1605x1140, 864 KB) Summary Lion shrine at en:Penn State, photo taken by User:Spangineer on 1 February 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1605x1140, 864 KB) Summary Lion shrine at en:Penn State, photo taken by User:Spangineer on 1 February 2005. ...

University Park

The largest of Penn State's 24 campuses, University Park, is almost entirely within the boundaries of State College borough, a site chosen to be near the geographic center of the state. With an acceptance rate of 54 percent,[2] it is the most selective campus in the Penn State system, due primarily to the fact that students select University Park as their first-choice campus at a far greater rate than Penn State's other undergraduate campuses.[3] During the fall 2006 semester, 36,612 undergraduate students and 6,302 graduate students were enrolled at University Park.[4] Of those, 45.2 percent were female[5] and 25.5 percent were not Pennsylvania residents.[6] While most of Pennsylvania State Universitys main campus is located in the borough of State College, Pennsylvania, its post office and postal address was dubbed University Park several decades ago to help differentiate university addresses from those in the town. ... State College redirects here. ...


Colleges

The University Park campus is organized into 13 distinct "colleges":[7]

In addition, the Penn State Board of Trustees voted in January to create a School of International Affairs, with the first classes to be admitted for the fall 2008 semester.[8] The school will be part of the Dickinson School of Law at its University Park campus location.[9] The Smeal College of Business is the business school of Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. ... The College of Earth and Mineral Sciences is a constituent semi-autonomous part Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. ... As of 2007, Information Sciences and Technology (IST) as a major is offered at 19 campuses with 142 faculty state wide and 42 faculty at the University Park main campus. ... The medal awarded to members of the college at graduation. ... Trickett Hall The Pennsylvania State University — Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ... A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ...

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (865x532, 15 KB) Modified from Image:Pennsylvania-counties-map. ...

Erie
• Brandywine
Berks
York
Lehigh
• Wilkes-Barre
• Worthington Scranton
DuBois
Beaver
Map depicting the locations of Penn State's 19 commonwealth campuses and the University Park campus.

Penn State Erie, The Behrend College is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University located in Erie, PA. History In 1948, Mary Behrend donated her familys Glenhill Farm Estate to Penn State in memory of her husband Ernst, co-founder of the Hammermill Paper Company. ... Penn State Brandywine is a commonwealth campus of the Pennsylvania State University, located in Media, Pennsylvania. ... Penn State Abington is a commonwealth campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Great Valley is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Berks Penn State Berks is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University located in Reading, PA. History First known as Wyomissing Polytechnic Institute, Penn State Berks became part of the Penn State system in 1958. ... Penn State Fayette is a Satellite Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Mont Alto is a Pennsylvania State University Commonwealth Campus. ... Penn State York is a Commonwealth Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Harrisburg is an undergraduate college and graduate school of the Pennsylvania State University, one of the largest and most widely recognized institutions in the nation. ... Penn State Lehigh Valley is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University located in Fogelsville, Pennsylvania, just outside of Allentown in the Lehigh Valley area of the state. ... Penn State Schuylkill is a Satellite Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Hazleton is a campus of the Pennsylvania State University located on the outskirts of Hazleton, PA and has a current enrollment of 1,114. ... Penn State Wilkes-Barre is a Satellite Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ... Penn State Altoona is a Satellite Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State DuBois is a Satellite Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Shenango is a Commonwealth Campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Beaver Campus. ... Penn State New Kensington, located 25 miles northeast of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is one of twenty-four campuses that make up The Pennsylvania State University. ... Penn State Greater Allegheny is a Commonwealth campus of the Pennsylvania State University in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. ... A mural in the Hetzel Union Building entitled Commonwealth Campuses shows their respective locations. ...

Commonwealth campuses

In addition to the University Park campus, 19 campus locations throughout the state offer enrollment for undergraduate students. Over 60 percent of Penn State first-year students begin their education at a location other than University Park. All of these smaller campuses offer a limited number of degree programs, but any student in good academic standing is guaranteed a spot at University Park to finish his or her degree if required or desired. Most students do complete their degree program at University Park (known as "change of assignment," since Penn State campuses are not independently operated and therefore "transferring" is an inaccurate term).[10] A mural in the Hetzel Union Building entitled Commonwealth Campuses shows their respective locations. ... A mural in the Hetzel Union Building entitled Commonwealth Campuses shows their respective locations. ...


Special-mission campuses

The The Dickinson School of Law of the Pennsylvania State University was founded in 1834 and is the oldest law school in Pennsylvania. It merged with Penn State in 2000. Students now have the choice of studying in either Carlisle or University Park, with classes teleconferenced between the two locations using high-tech audiovisual equipment. The school is ranked among the top 100 law schools nationally, and has produced a number of governors, members of congress, and judges. A number of high profile attorneys comprise the faculty and lead several centers and institutes devoted to specific practice areas. The school's alternative dispute resolution program is ranked among the top 10 nationally. The law school also houses the School of International Affairs. Trickett Hall The Pennsylvania State University — Dickinson School of Law is located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. ...


Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies is a special mission campus offering master's degrees, master's certification, and continuing professional education. Located in Malvern, Pa., it also offers classes at the old Philadelphia Navy Yard. Penn State Great Valley is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University. ... The Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, formerly Navy Yard, was the first naval shipyard of the United States. ...


Penn State Hershey Medical Center and College of Medicine in Hershey, Pa., is Penn State's medical school and teaching hospital. Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center has become only the ninth hospital in the United States and 16th worldwide to implant the CardioWest temporary Total Artificial Heart. A 60-year-old man suffering from end-stage heart failure received the device in a six-hour surgery on Wednesday (May 2). The procedure was performed by a surgical team led by Walter Pae Jr., Penn State Heart and Vascular Institute's program director, cardiac surgery. The sprawling complex of the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center from above. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Pennsylvania College of Technology, in Williamsport, Pa., offers certificates as well as degrees in over 10 technical fields. The Pennsylvania College of Technology, or Penn College, is a small university (of approximately 6000 students) located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. ...


In 1998, the University launched Penn State World Campus, or Penn State online, which offers over 50 online education programs, degrees, and certificates. Distance education has a long history at Penn State, which was one of the first universities in the country to offer a correspondence course for remote farmers in 1892. Examples of online programs include a master's in homeland security and public health preparedness, a bachelor of science in nursing, a master's in business administration, and certificates in applied statistics and economic and community development. Penn State's World Campus offers nine graduate degrees, 16 graduate certificates, 13 undergraduate degrees, and 16 undergraduate certificates. World Campus students come from 50 U.S. states, 43 countries, and seven continents. In 1998 The Pennsylvania State University launched its 25th campus of the University, Penn State World Campus. ...


Demographics and trends

Racial composition of student enrollment at Penn State as of fall 2006.

Racially, the University is representative of the state of Pennsylvania, although less diverse than comparable institutions. As of fall 2006, the racial makeup of the Penn State system, including all campuses and special-mission colleges, was 80.2 percent white, 4.0 percent African-American, 5.3 percent Asian-American, 3.1 percent Hispanic-American, 0.1 percent Native American, and 7.3 percent international students.[11] Over the past decade, minority enrollment as a percentage of total enrollment has risen 3.5 percent,[12] while minorities as a percentage of total teaching positions rose 2.0 percent from 1997 to 2002.[13] This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Organization

Penn State is a "state-related" university, part of Pennsylvania's Commonwealth System of Higher Education. As such, although it receives funding from the Commonwealth and is connected to the state through its board of trustees, it is otherwise independent and not subject to the state's direct control. For the 2006-2007 fiscal year, Penn State received 9.7 percent of its budget from state appropriations, the lowest of the four state-related institutions in Pennsylvania.[14] Initial reports concerning the 2007-2008 fiscal year indicate that Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell is recommending a 1.6 percent increase in state appropriations.[15] Penn State's appropriation request, submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Education in September, requested a 6.8 percent increase in funding.[16] The Commonwealth System of Higher Education is the organizing body of Pennsylvanias state-related schools. ... Edward Gene Ed Rendell (born January 5, 1944) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ...


Board of Trustees

The university is governed by the 32-member board of trustees. Its members include the president of the University, the Governor of the Commonwealth, and the state secretaries of agriculture, education, and conservation and natural resources. The other members include six trustees appointed by the Governor, nine elected by alumni, and six elected by Pennsylvania agricultural societies. Six additional trustees are elected by a board representing business and industry enterprises.[17] List of Pennsylvania Governors The office of Pennsylvania governor was created by the states Constitution of 1790. ...


The current chair of the board of trustees is James S. Broadhurst, a 1965 graduate of Penn State and CEO of Eat'n Park Hospitality Group, Inc.[18] Eatn Park is a restaurant chain with locations in Western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio and northern West Virginia. ...


The main responsibilities of the board are to select the president of Penn State, to determine the goals and strategic direction of the University, and to approve the annual budget.[19] Regular meetings of the board are held bi-monthly and take place primarily on the University Park campus, although on occasion meetings are held at other locations within the Commonwealth.[20]


Administration

Old Main, the main administrative building at Penn State University Park, at night.
See also: Category:Presidents of Pennsylvania State University

The president of the University is selected by the board and is given the authority for actual control of the university, including day-to-day management. In practice, this responsibility is delegated by the president to other departments of the administration, to the faculty, or to the student body.[19] The current president of the university is Graham Spanier. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x1504, 347 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1000x1504, 347 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Old Main Old Main, originally called Main Building and first built in 1863, was the first major building of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Graham B. Spanier, discussing Napster on October 18, 2003, in his university-provided residence, the Schreyer House Graham B. Spanier is president of The Pennsylvania State University that has 22 campus locations in Pennsylvania, succeeding Joab Thomas with his inaugural address on January 15, 1995. ...


The executive vice president and provost is the chief academic officer of the University. The current provost is Rodney Erickson. The Associate Vice President and Senior Associate Dean For Undergraduate Education is Jeremy Cohen.


Tuition

According to a recent survey by USA Today, Penn State's "flagship" campus, University Park, has the highest in-state tuition rates among comparable institutions nationwide.[21] While a task force formed in 2001 to study options for tuition projections determined that the University's operating efficiency is among the highest in postsecondary education,[22] it found that tuition increases at Penn State still consistently outpaced increases at other Big Ten Conference institutions.[23] Student leaders of The Council of Commonwealth Student Governments (CCSG), one of the University's most highly-regarded student organizations has led annual rallies to lower rate hikes at each of the 19 commonwealth campuses and at the Pennsylvania state capitol in Harrisburg.[24][25] In 2005, the board of trustees proposed a tuition freeze at the undergraduate campus locations (except University Park) as part of its state appropriation request.[26] Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Look up efficiency in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. ... A mural in the Hetzel Union Building entitled Commonwealth Campuses shows their respective locations. ...


Academics

The Forum Building, a classroom building with four 300+ capacity classrooms.

. As of February 2007, only 23 Pennsylvania colleges and universities held AACSB accreditation in business and accounting. The Smeal College of Business, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, Penn State Harrisburg, and Penn State Great Valley were among the institutions accredited.[27] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1984x805, 786 KB) Summary Photo by User:Spangineer on 1 February 2005 of the Forum classroom building at en:Penn State. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1984x805, 786 KB) Summary Photo by User:Spangineer on 1 February 2005 of the Forum classroom building at en:Penn State. ... AACSB International--The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), founded in 1916, has granted specialized business school accreditation to more than 500 degree-granting institutions in 30 countries. ... The Smeal College of Business is the business school of Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. ... Penn State Erie, The Behrend College is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University located in Erie, PA. History In 1948, Mary Behrend donated her familys Glenhill Farm Estate to Penn State in memory of her husband Ernst, co-founder of the Hammermill Paper Company. ... Penn State Harrisburg is an undergraduate college and graduate school of the Pennsylvania State University, one of the largest and most widely recognized institutions in the nation. ... Penn State Great Valley is a commonwealth campus of Pennsylvania State University. ...


Penn State offers an accelerated Premedical-Medical Program in cooperation with Jefferson Medical College.[28] Students in the program spend two or three years at Penn State before attending medical school at Jefferson. A pre-medical Degree is one preparing for medical school. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. Medical education in the United States includes educational activities involved in the education and training of medical doctors in the United States, from entry-level training through to continuing education of qualified specialists. ... Thomas Jefferson University is an independent medical school, health professions and medical research institution. ...


Over 10,000 students are enrolled in the University's graduate school, and over 70,000 degrees have been awarded since the school was founded in 1922.[29]


Research

During the 2006 fiscal year, Penn State's research budget totaled US$638 million, 56 percent of which was funded by federal agencies including the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. National Science Foundation reports indicate that in 2004 (the latest year that figures were available), Penn State ranked ninth in the country in terms of research expenditures. The University is also supported by private industry, ranking second nationwide in terms of research funding from that sector.[30][31] 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... USD redirects here. ...


The Applied Research Lab (ARL), located near the University Park campus, has been a research partner with the United States Department of Defense since 1945 and conducts research primarily in support of the United States Navy. It is the largest component of Penn State's research efforts statewide, with over 1,000 researchers and other staff members.[30][32] A map of the Penn State University Park Campus located in front of the Willard Building. ... The United States Department of Defense (DOD or DoD) is the federal department charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and the military. ... USN redirects here. ...


Penn State was one of the founding members of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), a partnership that includes 17 research-led universities in the United States, Asia and Europe. The network provides funding, facilitates collaboration between universities, and coordinates exchanges of faculty members and graduate students among institutions. Penn State president Graham Spanier is a former vice-chair of the WUN.[33][34] The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... Graham B. Spanier, discussing Napster on October 18, 2003, in his university-provided residence, the Schreyer House Graham B. Spanier is president of The Pennsylvania State University that has 22 campus locations in Pennsylvania, succeeding Joab Thomas with his inaugural address on January 15, 1995. ...


The Penn State University Libraries were ranked 14th among research libraries in North America in the most recent annual survey released by The Chronicle of Higher Education.[35] Pattee Library Pattee Library Penn State Universitys main library which was built in 1937-1940. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ...


The University's library system began with a 1,500-book library in Old Main, which has grown to 4.8 million volumes, in addition to 500,000 maps, five million microforms, and 160,000 films and videos.[36]


The campus is also host to a Radiation Science & Engineering Center, which houses the oldest operating university research reactor. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Radiation Science & Engineering Center (RSEC) houses the Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (BNR). ... Research reactors comprise a wide range of civil and commercial nuclear reactors which are generally not used for power generation. ...


Athletics

The Penn State logo near Beaver Stadium
See also: Penn State Nittany Lions football and Penn State Nittany Lions men's basketball

Penn State's mascot is the Nittany Lion. The school's official colors were originally black and pink, but the baseball team's uniforms faded to dark blue and white, so the school permanently changed the colors to the now-familiar blue and white.[37] Penn State participates in the NCAA Division I-A and in the Big Ten Conference for most sports. A few sports participate in different conferences: men's volleyball in the Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA); men's lacrosse in the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC); women's lacrosse in American Lacrosse conference; and hockey (American Collegiate Hockey Association). The fencing teams operate as independents.[38] The Penn State Nittany Lions (men) and Lady Lions (women) are the athletic teams of Pennsylvania State University. ... Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The Eastern Intercollegiate Volleyball Association (EIVA) is a college athletic conference whose member schools compete in mens volleyball. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ...


Athletic teams at Penn State have won 62 national collegiate team championships (34 NCAA, 2 consensus Division I football titles, 6 AIAW, 3 USWLA, 1 WIBC, and 4 national titles in boxing, 11 in men's soccer and one in wrestling in years prior to NCAA sponsorship). There have been another 53 national collegiate championships, by either individuals or club teams. The most recent championships were in 2007 when Women's Rugby, Men's Gymnastics, Men's/Women's Fencing, Women's Volleyball, and Men's Volleyball in 2008 all won their respective national titles. Since joining the Big Ten in 1991, Penn State teams have won 43 regular season conference titles and nine tournament titles, including ten consecutive titles in women's soccer (tied for the longest title streak in Big Ten history).[39][40] On December 15, 2007, the Women's Volleyball team won its second national championship against Stanford. On May 3, 2008, the Men's Volleyball team won their second national championship against Pepperdine. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women’s athletics and to administer national championships. ... The Womens International Bowling Congress (WIBC) was an organization for women bowlers formed in 1917 as a counterpart to the American Bowling Congress (ABC). ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Pepperdine University is located overlooking Malibu, California. ...


Penn State has one of the most successful overall athletic programs in the country, as evidenced by the University's top 25 finish in the NACDA Director's Cup every year since the ranking's inception 13 years ago. The Director's Cup is a list compiled by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics that charts institutions' overall success in college sports. In the history of the Directors’ Cup, the Nittany Lions have finished in the top 10 seven times and the top five four times.[41] In 1999, Sporting News named Penn State as the country's best overall athletic program, citing its consistent and wide-ranging athletic successes along with its athletes' long-standing tradition of excelling in the classroom.


In fact, Penn State student-athletes receive academic honors that often far exceed those awarded to other Division 1-A schools. In 2006, a school record 78 students received Academic All-Big Ten honors, the highest among schools in the Big Ten for the seventh time in nine years.[42] For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ...


Despite widespread success in the overall athletic program, however, the school is best known for its football team, which draws a very large following. Penn State's Beaver Stadium has the second largest seating capacity (over 107,282) of any stadium in the nation, behind only Michigan Stadium. The football team is led by legendary coach Joe Paterno, who at 81 is in his 42nd year as head coach (as of the 2007 season). Joe Paterno is in a constant race with Bobby Bowden, the head coach for Florida State, for the most wins ever in Division I-A (now the FBS) history. Currently, he is the all-time winningest coach in Division I-A history. He was recently inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ...


The University also opened a new Penn State All-Sports Museum in February 2002. This two-level 10,000-square-foot (1,000 m²) museum is located inside Beaver Stadium.[43] On gameday State College becomes the 3rd largest city in PA, only to be passed by Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. Beaver Stadium is an outdoor football stadium located on the campus of The Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania. ...


In addition to the school funded athletics, club sports also play a major role in the University, with over 64 club sport organizations meeting regularly to date. One such team is the Penn State Ski Team, which competes as part of the United States Collegiate Ski and Snowboard Association (USCSA) in the Allegheny Conference. Some other clubs include Baseball, Squash, Karate, Crew (rowing) and even Sailing.


Penn State's most well-known athletic cheer is "We are...Penn State." Typically, the students and cheerleaders shout "We are," followed by a response of "Penn State" from the rest of the fans. This is typically done three or four times, and followed by "Thank you..." "... you're welcome!" when completed. The cheer is by no means restricted to sporting events; for instance, groups of potential students walking around campus are often subjected to chants of the cheer, which they are to answer.


Student life

The University's fight song is "Fight On, State," and other notable songs performed at public celebrations include the Penn State Alma Mater and "Hail to the Lion." Fight On, State is the official fight song of Penn State. ... Penn States Alma Mater was written by Fred Lewis Pattee, longtime Professor of American Literature at the institution. ...

A residence hall in West Halls

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Diversity

Penn State has exhibited consistent positive trends in efforts to promote a diverse and multicultural campus, most notably beginning in 1990 with the creation of a position for a vice provost for educational equity and the adoption of a five-year strategic plan to "create an environment characterized by equal access and respected participation for all groups and individuals irrespective of cultural differences."[44][45]


Despite these efforts, criticism of the University's treatment of sensitive issues involving race and sexuality remain. During the spring of 2001, in response to racially-based death threats received by several African-American students,[46] several hundred students occupied the Hetzel Union Building in protest of insufficient efforts by University officials to promote diversity.[46] After a week of negotiations and demonstrations, an agreement was reached. The result was the establishment of an Africana Studies Research Center and an investigation into the existing "Intercultural/International Competence" requirement for all students.[47][48] The Hetzel Union Building, commonly referred to as the HUB is the student union building centrally located on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ...

Sunrise over Mt. Nittany

More recently, administrators and the athletic department were criticized for their handling of a sexual discrimination lawsuit filed by former Lady Lions basketball player Jen Harris, alleging that head coach Rene Portland dismissed her from the team in part due to her sexual orientation. While Penn State and the National Center for Lesbian Rights jointly issued a statement describing the settlement as "amicable" to all parties,[49] members of the Penn State community protested that the settlement did not represent progress on the part of the University toward a more tolerant campus climate.[50] Rene Portland is currently the womens basketball coach at Penn State. ...


Respect Comes Full Circle is the University-wide campaign to address diversity issues on each campus, created by Penn State University Publications.[51]


Residence Life

See also: List of Penn State residence halls

West Halls residential complex, University Park campus The following is a list of the residence halls within the Pennsylvania State University system. ...

Student organizations

Penn State's student union building, the HUB Robeson Center.

As of May 15, 2007, 667 student organizations were recognized at the University Park campus.[52] In addition, Penn State has one of the largest Greek systems in the country, with approximately 12 percent of the University Park population affiliated.[53] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 626 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 626 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pennsylvania State University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... The Hetzel Union Building, commonly referred to as the HUB is the student union building centrally located on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


The Penn State Glee Club, founded in 1888, is the oldest student organization on campus, and has reached a broad audience with their annual spring break tour, which has led them to many destinations around the globe. Another organization rich in history is the Penn State Thespians, who have performed theatre at University Park since 1898, and are the oldest continuously-active student-run organization on campus (the Glee Club having been temporarily suspended during the Second World War). Additionally, the Penn State Blue Band, founded in 1899, performs during halftime at football games and at other university functions, and was honored with the Sudler Trophy in 2005. The Trophy, which has been presented by the John Philip Sousa Foundation since 1982, is regarded as the nation's highest accolade for collegiate bands. The Penn State Glee Club is the mens collegiate chorus of the Pennsylvania State University and one of the most active and distinguished clubs in the United States. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Blue Band redirects here. ... The Wisconsin Band, known for its unique stop at the top high step, performs at the HHH Metrodome during a football game against arch-rival Minnesota. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Penn State is also home to the Paranormal Research Society (PRS), which has earned national media attention over the past few years. The A&E Network recently announced that it is developing a national reality series with the group and University, entitled Paranormal State. Parts of the series will be filmed on campus. The Penn State Paranormal Research Society is one the only known university-backed paranormal groups in the United States. ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ...


Media

The student-run newspaper is The Daily Collegian. Since the summer of 1996, the traditional paper publication has been supplemented by an online edition, known as The Digital Collegian. In addition, Penn State's newspaper readership program provides free copies of USA Today and the New York Times, as well as local and regional newspapers depending on the campus location (for example, the Centre Daily Times in University Park). This program, initiated by President Graham Spanier in 1997,[54] has since been modeled by nearly 400 other universities across the country.[55] The Daily Collegian is the student-operated newspaper at the Pennsylvania State University. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Centre Daily Times is a daily newspaper located in State College, Pa. ...


The student-run organization for yearbooks is named La Vie. La Vie 1987 won the highest recognition given by the Columbia Scholastic Press Association [1] to a student print or online medium for overall excellence, the Gold Crown Award. The La Vie 1987 editor-in-chief was David Beagin.


The student-run radio station is The LION 90.7 fm (WKPS-FM). Founded in 1995 as a replacement for Penn State's original student radio station WDFM, The LION broadcasts from the ground floor of the HUB-Robeson Center, serving the Penn State and State College communities with alternative music and talk programming, including live coverage of home Penn State football games. The LION's signal can be heard in the greater State College area at 90.7 FM and anywhere in the world via its live 24/7 webstream at www.theLION.fm. The LION's programming grid can be found at www.thelion.fm/shows/. Among the station's most popular shows is its long-running public affairs program, Radio Free Penn State, hosted by Andy Nagypal, which airs weekdays from 5-6pm Eastern. WKPS (The Lion 90. ... Radio Free Penn State, commonly referenced as Radio Free or RFPS, is a public affairs talk show that airs weekdays on The Lion 90. ...


In addition, the Penn State College of Communications operates ComRadio. It was founded in the spring of 2003 as an internet-based audio laboratory and co-curricular training environment for aspiring student broadcasters. ComRadio is most well known for its coverage of most major Penn State sporting events. ComRadio also airs student-produced Penn State news. Other programming includes student talk shows, political coverage, AP syndicated news and soft rock music.


The student-run humor magazine is Phroth.


IFC/Panhellenic Dance Marathon

Every February, thousands of students participate in the Penn State Dance Marathon (THON), the largest student-run philanthropy in the world. In previous years, participants stood for 48 hours nonstop and performed a line dance at least once every hour to stay alert. In 2007, THON was moved to the Bryce Jordan Center and now lasts 46 hours. THON raises millions of dollars annually for pediatric cancer care and research, generally through the Four Diamonds Fund. In 2008, THON raised more than US$6.6 million. THON 2007 held for the first time in the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus of Penn State. ... THON 2007 held for the first time in the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus of Penn State. ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... The Four Diamonds Fund is a charitable organization based out of Penn State Hershey Medical Center. ... USD redirects here. ...


Due to Hershey High School's affiliation with Penn State Medical Center, a 12-hour dance marathon is held annually in the Hershey High School Cafeteria and Gymnasium. The dance is organized by the Hershey High School Key Club along with the Four Diamonds Fund, and thousands of Penn State Students


Former traditions

  • Phi Psi 500

The Phi Psi 500, organized in the 1970s by undergraduates in the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, was a raucous fundraising event popular among students. Contestants entered either individually or in theme-related groups and had to run a 1.1-mile (1.8 km) course through downtown State College. During the run, contestants had to make a half-dozen stops at taverns for beer or soft drinks. Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ...


Revenue generated through entry fees and donations went to local charities. The Phi Psi 500 brought a large number of alumni visitors as well as resident spectators and student participants. Over US$21,000 was raised by 1,800 runners in the 14th running in April 1983.[56] USD redirects here. ...


The Phi Psi 500 was outlawed by University officials in the early 1980s. Today, the Phi Psi 500 is still a large philanthropic event orchestrated by an "underground" group of current students.[citation needed]

  • Sy Barash Regatta

Another popular fundraiser that sprung up in the 1970s was the Sy Barash Regatta. Sy Barash was a prominent State College businessman and civic leader who died of cancer in 1974. The regatta named in his honor began a year later, with proceeds going to cancer research. The Beta Sigma Beta Sy Barash Regatta was named for a Beta Sig, Sy Barash, a prominent State College businessman and civic leader who succumbed to cancer in 1974. ... A regatta is a boat race or series of boat races. ...


Beta Sigma Beta fraternity, of which Barash had been a member, sponsored the regatta first held at Stone Valley until 1983. Eventually, the regatta witnessed more than 15,000 visitors. By the mid 1980s, the popularity of the multi-faceted event forced its move to Bald Eagle State Park.


Aside from the nautical competition, the regatta offered picnics, music and other leisure activities. By the end of its first decade, the Sy Barash Regatta has raised more than US$100,000 for the Centre County chapter of the American Cancer Society. USD redirects here. ...

  • Gentle Thursday

Co-sponsored by The Free University, Gentle Thursday was a popular social event that occurred each spring. Proclaimed as a "day of sharing," students were encouraged to show concern for one another and forgo academic and campus political concerns. Crowds of students on the lawns of the Hetzel Union Building and Old Main enjoyed live music, food, friends and films.


Gentle Thursday eventually became a day of over-indulgence, highlighted by many drug- and alcohol-related incidents. These incidents and general truancy caused in area secondary schools led to Gentle Thursday's death in 1980.


Football and Student Life

The student section at Beaver Stadium achieved a sellout of more than 21,000 season tickets in a remarkable 59 minutes for the 2007 season. The unprecedented sale took place in record time, according to Bud Meredith, Director of Ticket Operations. The previous record was 13 days last year, using a combination of online sales and applications that were mailed to the ticket office.


The 21,000 student season tickets are the fourth-largest number in college sports (the school made an additional 520 student season tickets available this year compared to 2006). However, Penn State has the lowest percentage of students given the opportunity to purchase season in tickets in the Big Ten, and one of the lowest in the nation at just 25.25%. Conversely, Ohio State University, with a student section of 29,000 tickets (in a smaller stadium nonetheless) has seats for 57.16% of their students.[57] Penn State has approximately 90,000 season ticket holders overall, also among the largest in the nation. Big Ten can refer to: Big Ten Conference, a college athletics conference Big Ten (movie studios), the largest movie studios in Hollywood This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


The passionate, loyal and enthusiastic Penn State student section is a primary reason Beaver Stadium is one of the nation’s toughest venues for opposing teams. The Nittany Lions averaged 107,567 fans at home last season, second-highest in the nation, topped only by 110,007 for the prime time clash with Michigan.


A recent attempt to move to a lottery format for student season tickets was met with opposition that many believed was the most swift and comprehensive response to school policy in decades. A student rally ensued on the steps of Old Main to celebrate the reversal of the lottery to the previous "first-come, first-served" procedure. The sale was instead changed from a mail-in form to an online format at Ticketmaster, which handles large-demand, high-profile, online tickets sales on a daily basis. Ticketmaster is based in West Hollywood, California, USA, but has operations in many countries around the world. ...


Alumni and notable people

Established in 1870, nine years after Penn State's first commencement exercises, the Penn State Alumni Association has the stated mission "to connect alumni to the University and to each other, provide valuable benefits to members and support the University's mission of teaching, research and service."[58] The Alumni Association supports a number of educational and extracurricular missions of Penn State through financial support and is the network that connects alumni through over 280 "alumni groups," many of which are designated based on geographical, academic, or professional affiliation.[59]

Former President's house, now adjoined to the Hintz Alumni Center

As of 2006, the Alumni Association counts 453,346 members within the United States, with an additional 6,277 in countries around the globe. More than half the United States alumni reside in Pennsylvania, primarily in the urban areas of Philadelphia (and Montgomery County) and Pittsburgh (and Allegheny County) and in the Centre County region surrounding State College. About 34 percent of United States alumni and 21 percent of international alumni are members of the Alumni Association.[60][61] With membership totaling 154,688, the Penn State Alumni Association is the largest dues-paying alumni association in the world, a distinction it has held since 1995.[62] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 988 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 988 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... City nickname: The Steel City Location in the state of Pennsylvania Founded 1758 Mayor Tom Murphy (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 151. ... Pittsburgh skyline The Allegheny County Courthouse Allegheny County is a county in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... Centre County is a county located in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. ... State College redirects here. ... An alumni association is an association of former students (alumni). ...


Since 2001, Penn State, along with all schools in the Big Ten, has participated in the "Big Ten Challenge" website, which is a "competitive" clearinghouse of alumni donation statistics for member schools. Results are tracked to determine a percentage of each school's alumni from the previous decade who gave to their alma mater each calendar year (for example, during the 2005-2006 year, alumni donations from 1996 to 2005 were tallied). With the exception of 2005-2006, when Penn State fell to second behind Northwestern University,[63] Penn State has won the challenge each year since its inception.[64][65][66][67] For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ...

Further information: List of Pennsylvania State University people

This is a list of famous individuals associated with the Pennsylvania State University, including graduates, former students, and professors. ...

Points of interest

The Arboretum at Penn State (395 acres) is a new arboretum now being created by Pennsylvania State University adjacent to its campus in State College, Pennsylvania. ... The new Creamery, located in the new Food Science Building, opened in 2006. ... Beaver Stadium is an outdoor football stadium located on the campus of The Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania. ... Bryce Jordan Center is a 15,261-seat multi-purpose arena in University Park, Pennsylvania. ...

References

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  • Short History of Penn State
  • An Illustrated History of Penn State
  • Official Statistics and Common Data

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Pennsylvania State University
  • The Pennsylvania State University official website
  • Penn State Board of Trustees
  • Penn State Dickinson School of Law
  • Penn State Alumni Association
  • Penn State athletics official website
  • The Daily Collegian Online
  • The Penn State Press
  • Penn State Dance Marathon
  • The University Park Undergraduate Association
  • The Council of Commonwealth Student Governments Website
  • The LION 90.7fm - Student Radio (WKPS)
  • Pennsylvania State University is at coordinates 40°47′46″N 77°51′46″W / 40.796036, -77.862739 (Pennsylvania State University)Coordinates: 40°47′46″N 77°51′46″W / 40.796036, -77.862739 (Pennsylvania State University)
This list of largest United States higher education institutions by enrollment includes only individual four-year campuses, not four-year universities. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... UCF redirects here. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public research university located in Madison, Wisconsin. ... UCF redirects here. ... Texas A&M University redirects here. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... UNT redirects here. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[8] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pennsylvania State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2627 words)
Penn State was founded as a degree-granting institution on February 22, 1855 by act P.L. 46, No. 50 of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as the Farmers' High School of Pennsylvania.
Currently, the University is the largest in Pennsylvania, and in 2003, it was credited with having the largest impact on the state economy of any organization, generating over $6 billion for the state on a budget of $2.5 billion.
The student-to-faculty ratio at Penn State campuses is 16:1.
Pennsylvania State University Athletics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1219 words)
The Penn State All-Sports Museum, a museum honoring all Penn State Nittany Lion athletes is located near Gate B of Beaver Stadium.
Penn State's women's volleyball team has won eight Big Ten Conference championships in fourteen years, including the 2003, 2004 and 2005 titles, and was the NCAA division I national champion in 1999.
Penn State is a fencing powerhouse, winning 9 national championships in the sport since the NCAA began awarding titles in 1990.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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