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Encyclopedia > Penalty shot (ice hockey)

In ice hockey, a penalty shot is a type of penalty awarded when a team loses a clear scoring opportunity because of a foul committed by an opposing player. One player is given an attempt to score a goal without opposition from any defending players except the goaltender. Unlike penalty kicks in football (soccer) and penalty strokes in field hockey, the player is allowed to skate with the puck before shooting. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A penalty in ice hockey is a punishment for inappropriate behaviour. ... The puck dents the top of the net for a goal as the goaltender fails to block the shot A goal in ice hockey provides a team with one point. ... This article is about the goaltender in ice hockey. ... Players taking up positions prior to a penalty kick; note that the goalkeeper is not yet in the required position A penalty kick is a type of free kick in association football (soccer), taken from twelve yards (eleven metres) out from goal and with only the goalkeeper of the defending... Football (soccer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... Two standard hockey pucks. ...

When calling a Penalty Shot, the referee will signal by crossing his clenched fists above his head.
When calling a Penalty Shot, the referee will signal by crossing his clenched fists above his head.

The penalty shot was added to the rule books of the National Hockey League for the 1934-35 season, allowing them to be awarded when a player was fouled while in "a good scoring position." The first penalty shot was awarded to the Montreal Canadiens' Armand Mondou on November 10, 1934; he was stopped by the Toronto Maple Leafs' George Hainsworth. On November 13, Ralph "Scotty" Bowman of the St. Louis Eagles scored the first penalty shot goal in NHL history. Image File history File links Penshot. ... NHL redirects here. ... The classic NHL shield logo The 1934-35 NHL season was the 18th season of the National Hockey League. ... The Montreal Canadiens are the oldest established National Hockey League (NHL) franchise. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... The Toronto Maple Leafs are a professional ice hockey team based in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... George Hainsworth (June 26, 1895 in Toronto, Ontario - October 9, 1950) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender who played for the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs in the National Hockey League (NHL). ... November 13 is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 48 days remaining. ... Ralph Scotty Bowman - (Born January 20, 1911, in Winnipeg, Manitoba - Died 1990) was a Professional Hockey Defenseman who played 7 seasons in the National Hockey League for the Ottawa Senators, St. ... The Ottawa Senators are an ice hockey team based in Ottawa, Canada. ...


Penalty shots are most commonly awarded when a player is fouled from behind on a breakaway and is not able to take a shot. Other fouls that result in penalty shots include throwing the stick in the defending zone or at a player on a breakaway, purposely dislodging the goal post to prevent a scoring opportunity, a defending player other than the goaltender falling on or picking up the puck while it is in the goal crease, and deliberate illegal substitution in the last two minutes of regulation time or in overtime. In the Southern Professional Hockey League, since its inception in 2004, a penalty shot is automatically awarded for a minor penalty in the final two minutes of overtime. A breakaway in ice hockey is a situation in which a player with the puck has no defending players except the goaltender between himself and the opposing goal, leaving him free to skate in and shoot at will (assuming he can skate faster than the defenders trying to catch him). ... A shot in ice hockey is an attempt by a player to score a goal by striking the puck with his stick in the direction of the net. ... A hockey stick is the equipment used to handle a man in ice hockey, field hockey or roller hockey. ... A hockey rink is an ice rink specifically designed for the game of ice hockey. ... The Southern Professional Hockey League (SPHL) is a professional ice hockey league with teams located in the southeastern United States. ...


To start a penalty shot, the puck is placed on the centre faceoff spot, and the goaltender stands on the goal line. When the referee blows the whistle, the attacking player may take control of the puck and attempt to score. Once the attacker touches the puck, the goaltender may step away from the line for better positioning. The shooter is allowed one shot – a goal cannot be scored on a rebound – and once the puck crosses the goal line, the penalty shot is considered complete. Play stops immediately following a penalty shot. The time needed for the shot is not included in the playing time of the game. If the shot is unsuccessful, play is restarted with a faceoff in the zone where the penalty shot was tried. If the shot is successful, the faceoff is at center ice as with any other goal. A typical faceoff at centre ice A faceoff is the method used to begin play in ice hockey. ... This article is about the goaltender in ice hockey. ... ...


Although most of the rule books do not specify a time limit, they do require the shooter to move the puck continuously toward a scoring attempt, once it is touched. The skater may also skate for a short time prior to touching the puck, to build up his momentum. At any point, the referee would have to judge whether the attacker is stalling, and thus nullify the play.


Frequently, players will attempt to deke around the goaltender in an effort to score. Other players may simply shoot quickly in front of the goaltender, relying on the quick release of the shot to score a goal. Deke, sometimes known as a dangle, is an ice hockey technique which a player uses to get past an opponent. ...


If a penalty shot is awarded and the penalized team had pulled their goaltender in favour of an extra attacker, an automatic goal is awarded in lieu of the penalty shot. An extra attacker in ice hockey is a forward or, less commonly, a defenceman who has been substituted in place of the goaltender. ...


A penalty shot is considered by some commentators to be the most exciting moment in hockey. However, due to the circumstances necessary to trigger a penalty shot call, penalty shots are rare in the NHL, especially in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Far fewer goals are scored on penalty shots compared to penalty kicks. The modernized NHL shield logo, debuting in 2005. ...


In the long history of Stanley Cup play, only 46 penalty shots have been called, and only eight in the Finals since the first one in 1937. The first seven resulted in no score. The first successful penalty shot goal in Stanley Cup Finals history occurred on June 5, 2006, when Chris Pronger of the Edmonton Oilers beat Cam Ward of the Carolina Hurricanes, following an illegal covering of the puck by a Carolina player. June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Christopher Robert Pronger (born October 10, 1974, in Dryden, Ontario, Canada) is a professional hockey player for the Anaheim Ducks. ... The Edmonton Oilers are a professional ice hockey team based in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... Cameron Ward (born February 29, 1984 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) is a professional Canadian ice hockey goaltender. ... The Carolina Hurricanes are a National Hockey League team in Raleigh, North Carolina. ...


Strategy

Strategy is considered to be very important during penalty shots and overtime shootouts for both the shooter and the goalie. Both shooters and goalies commonly consult their teammates and coaches for advice on the opposing player's style of play. Shooters often consider the goalie's strengths and weaknesses (such as a fast glove or stick save), preferred goaltending style (such as butterfly or stand-up and method of challenging the shooter. Goaltenders often consider the shooter's shot preference, expected angle of attack, a patented move a shooter commonly uses and even handedness of the shooter. Overtime, in ice hockey, is a method of determining the winner and loser of ice hockey matches should a game be tied after regulation. ... Example EU engergy label According to an EU Directive most white goods and light bulb packaging must have an EU Energy Label clearly displayed when offered for sale or rent. ... In ice hockey, the butterfly style refers to a style of goaltending in which the goaltender covers the lower part of the net with his or her leg pads, mainly by dropping down on knees. ... In ice hockey, the stand-up style, as the name suggests, refers to a style of goaltending in which the goaltender makes the majority of the saves standing up, or simply put, not falling to his or her knees. ...


Most shooters attempt to out-deke the goalie in order to create a better scoring chance. Minnesota Wild forward Mikko Koivu and Tampa Bay Lightning forward Martin St. Louis are examples of players who commonly use this strategy. However, it is not uncommon for a shooter to simply shoot for an opening without deking. This is commonly referred to as sniping. This is most commonly performed when a goalie challenges a shooter by giving them an open hole (by keeping a glove, pad or stick out of position or being out of sound goaltending position all-together to tempt the shooter to aim for the given opening). Vancouver Canuck forward Markus Naslund and former NHL forward Brett Hull are commonly referred to as snipers. Marc-Andre Fleury and Dominik Hasek are well-known for their ability to challenge shooters and make spectacular saves. Very rarely a shooter may take a slapshot or wrist shot from the point or top of the slot. This is almost exclusively performed when a shooter either has a high level of confidence in their shot or they attempt to catch the goalie by surprise. Minnesota Wild forward Brian Rolston and Anaheim Mighty Ducks defenseman Chris Pronger have both used this strategy with success. In fact, Pronger succeeded in using this strategy in the 2006 Stanley Cup Finals against Carolina Hurricanes goaltender Cam Ward. Deke, sometimes known as a dangle, is an ice hockey technique which a player uses to get past an opponent. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Mikko Koivu (born March 12, 1983 in Turku, Finland) is a Finnish professional ice hockey forward currently playing his rookie season for the Minnesota Wild. ... The Tampa Bay Lightning is a professional ice hockey team based in Tampa, Florida. ... Marty with his two awards Martin St. ... This is a list of common terminology and slang used in ice hockey along with explanations of their meanings. ... Markus Näslund Markus Näslund (born July 30, 1973, in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden) is a professional ice hockey player currently playing for the Vancouver Canucks. ... Brett Andrew Hull (born August 9, 1964 in Belleville, Ontario) is a former NHL player, and the son of legendary player Bobby Hull. ... This is a list of common terminology and slang used in ice hockey along with explanations of their meanings. ... Marc-André Fleury (b. ... Dominik Hašek (born January 29, 1965 in Pardubice, Czechoslovakia (now Czech Republic)), also known by his nickname The Dominator, is a professional ice hockey goaltender. ... A slapshot in ice hockey is the hardest shot. ... A wrist shot is a type of ice hockey shot that involves using arm muscles (especially those in the wrist and forearm) to propel a puck forward from the open-faced, concave part of the blade of a hockey stick. ... Point in ice hockey has two meanings: When it is given to individual hockey players, it refers to either a goal or assist a player earns during a game. ... In hockey the slot is the area on the hockey rink directly ahead of the goaltender between the faceoff circles on each side. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Brian Rolston (Born February 21, 1973 in Flint, Michigan) is a professional hockey player currently playing for the Minnesota Wild. ... The Mighty Ducks of Anaheim are a National Hockey League team based in Anaheim, California. ... Christopher Robert Pronger (born October 10, 1974, in Dryden, Ontario, Canada) is a professional hockey player for the Anaheim Ducks. ... The NHL unveiled a you suck logo for the 2006 Stanley Cup Playoffs. ... The Carolina Hurricanes are a National Hockey League team in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... Cameron Ward (born February 29, 1984 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) is a professional Canadian ice hockey goaltender. ...


See also

The majority of ice hockey around the world is played under the umbrella of three organizations, Hockey Canada, USA Hockey, and the International Ice Hockey Federation, each with their own set of rules. ... NHL redirects here. ... A breakaway is a situation in ice hockey in which a player with the puck has no defending players, except for the goaltender, between himself and the opposing goal, leaving him free to skate in and shoot at will (assuming he can skate faster than the defenders trying to catch...

External links

  • List of Stanley Cup penalty shots
  • Penalty shot added to NHL rules

  Results from FactBites:
 
ICE Hockey 2.0 - Penalties (2270 words)
A penalty in ice hockey is a punishment for inappropriate behaviour, or the inappropriate behaviour itself (whether called or not).
A penalty shot may also be called if a defending player other than the goaltender gathers the puck into his body or grabs the puck in the defending zone (handling the puck with the hands).
For infractions that are too minor to deserve a penalty such as icing, hand passes, and offsides, the team is penalized by a faceoff closer to their end, but this is not a penalty under the rules of hockey.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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