FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Penalty shootout (football)

Penalty shootouts, officially named kicks from the penalty mark, are a method sometimes used to decide which team progresses to the next stage of a tournament (or wins the tournament) following a draw in a game of football. Kicks during a shootout are governed by different rules from a penalty kick, which are part of normal play during a match. A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Players taking up positions prior to a penalty kick; note that the goalkeeper is not yet in the required position A penalty kick is a type of free kick in association football (soccer), taken from twelve yards (eleven metres) out from goal and with only the goalkeeper of the defending...

Contents

Overview

Shootouts are almost always used only in knockout (as opposed to league) games, to decide who will progress to the next stage of a tournament, or who will win it. Usually extra time has been played first. However, the Copa Libertadores has a penalty shootout immediately after the end of a two-legged tie that is level on aggregate, with no extra time played. Since 2005, this takes place if there is no winner on away goals. In the late 1980s, a number of European football leagues, including Hungary, Yugoslavia and Norway, experimented with penalty shootouts immediately after drawn league matches, with the winner gaining one point more than the loser. This was soon abandoned. In the United States, Major League Soccer initially also had a shootout immediately following the end of full-time, even during league matches. This has also since been abandoned. Extra time is an additional period played at the end of some games of football (soccer) if the score is tied after the two standard periods (halves) of play. ... The Copa Libertadores de América (also known as Copa Toyota Libertadores) (Portuguese: Taça Libertadores da América, English: Liberators of America Cup) is an international football cup competition played annually by the top clubs of South America. ... The away goals rule is a method of breaking ties in football and other sports when teams play each other twice, once at each teams home ground. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ...


Penalty shootouts do not follow the penalty kick law. However, they follow similar procedure to penalty kicks and are popularly referred to as "penalties". During a shootout, players other than the kicker and the defending goalkeeper must remain in the centre circle (other than the kicking team's goalkeeper, who stands on the junction of goal line and penalty area near to the assistant referee).


Goals scored during the shootout are not included in the final score, nor are they added to the goalscoring records of the players involved. Strictly speaking, kicks from the penalty mark do not result in a match winner. The match remains a draw and the result of the kicks is merely used to select a winner to progress to the next stage of the tournament (or win it in the case of the final). However, in popular usage a team is often said to have "won on penalties", and such matches have their result recorded as (for example): "Team A 2–2 Team B a.e.t, Team B won 5–4 on penalties". In some competitions (not FIFA or MLS), the final score is recorded as a one goal victory in favour of the team winning the shootout, although there is no official "match-winning goal." For example if a team wins a shootout after a scoreless game the final score would be reported as 1-0, regardless of how many shootout goals there were. This was MLS's practice in the years when shootouts decided every match. However, this is only done mainly at the high school levels now.


Procedure

The following is a summary of the procedure for kicks from the penalty mark:

  • The team to take the first kick is decided by a coin toss.
  • All players other than the kicker and the goalkeepers must remain in the pitch's centre circle (see above).
  • Each kick is taken in the general manner of a penalty kick. Each kick is taken from the penalty mark, with the goal defended only by the opposing goalkeeper. The goalkeeper must remain between the goal-posts on his goal-line until the ball has been kicked, although he can jump in place, wave his arms, move side to side along the goal line or otherwise try to distract the shooter.

In reality, goalkeepers seldom remain on the goal-line and move forward with the aim of reducing the angle of the penalty shot, therefore increasing their chance of saving the penalty, albeit unfairly. If the shot is saved, the referee can call for a retake of the penalty, but again, this seldom ever happens. A football field is the playing surface for the game of football (soccer). ... The penalty area (colloquiallly also known as the 18-yard box, penalty box or simply the box), is an area of an association football field. ...

  • Each kicker can kick the ball only once per attempt. If the ball is saved by the goalkeeper the kicker cannot score from the rebound (unlike a normal penalty kick). Similarly, if the ball bounces off the goal posts, the kicker cannot score from the rebound (like a normal penalty kick).
  • Teams take turns to kick from the penalty mark in attempt to score a goal, until each has taken five kicks. However, if one side has scored more goals than the other could possibly reach with all of their remaining kicks, the shootout ends regardless of the number of kicks remaining.
  • If at the end of these five rounds of kicks the teams have scored an equal number of goals, sudden death rounds of one kick each are used until one side scores and the other does not.
  • Only players who were on the pitch at the end of play are allowed to take kicks, no substitutes can be used.
  • No player is allowed to take a second kick from the penalty mark until all other players on his team (who have not received a red card) have taken a kick from the penalty mark (including the goalkeepers). However, if at the beginning of kicks from the penalty mark one side has more players on the pitch than the other, then the side with more players shall select an appropriate number of players who will not take part. For example, if Team A has 11 players but Team B only has 10, then Team A will choose one player who will not take part. Note that it is not allowed to deselect a goalkeeper from having to take part in kicking from the penalty mark. Players deselected cannot play any part in the procedure.

Sudden death (or a sudden death round) is a way of providing a winner for a contest or game (typically a sport) which would otherwise end in a tie. ...

History

Knockout ties were previously decided by drawing of lots, for example in 1968 when Italy reached the European Championship Final against the USSR.


The penalty shootout is usually credited as the invention of former referee Karl Wald, from Frankfurt-am-Main [1]. When proposed in 1970, the Bavarian football association attempted to block the suggestion, and it was only when the majority of delegates said they were in favour that the officials gave their backing. Frankfurt am Main [ˈfraŋkfʊrt] is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth largest city in Germany. ...


Shortly afterwards, the German football association followed suit and UEFA and FIFA also accepted the proposal[2].


Israeli Yosef Dagan is also claimed by some to have invented the method, after the Israel national football team was eliminated from the 1968 Summer Olympics semi-finals due to a coin toss. First international  Egypt 7 - 1 Palestine/Eretz Israel (Cairo, Egypt; March 16, 1934)  USA 3 - 1 Israel (New York City, USA; September 26, 1948) Biggest win Israel 9 - 0 Chinese Taipei  (Wellington, New Zealand; March 23, 1988) Biggest defeat Egypt 7 - 1 Palestine/Eretz Israel (Cairo, Egypt; March 16, 1934...


Initially, teams did not alternate their kicks. One side kicked five times, followed by the other. The shootout ended as soon as the winner became obvious. In case of a draw, both teams had a second round of five kicks each until a winner was decided. Alternation was introduced by 1976.


In England, the first ever penalty shootout took place in 1970 between Hull City and Manchester United during the Watney Cup, and was won by Manchester United. The first footballer to take a kick was George Best, and the first to miss was Denis Law. Ian McKechnie, the Hull City goalkeeper was therefore the first goalkeeper to save a penalty in a penalty shootout and he too was the first goalkeeper to take the deciding kick and missed, blasting the ball over the bar and Hull City out of the Watney Cup. Hull City Association Football Club is an English football club based in Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... The Watney Mann Invitation Cup (normally referred to as simply the Watney Cup) was a short-lived English football tournament held in the early 1970s. ... For the 1987 album by The Wedding Present, see George Best (album). ... Denis Law (born February 24, 1940, in Aberdeen, Scotland) is a retired Scottish football player, who enjoyed a long and successful career as a striker from the 1950s to the 1970s. ...


The first major international tournament to be decided by a penalty shootout was the Euro 76 final between Czechoslovakia and West Germany. Czechoslovakia won 5–3, and the deciding kick was converted by Antonín Panenka with a "chip" after Uli Hoeneß had put the previous kick over the crossbar. The 1976 European Football Championship (Euro 76) final tournament was held in Yugoslavia. ... Antonín Panenka (born December 2, 1948 in Prague) is a former Czech footballer. ... Ulrich Uli Hoeneß, (alternative spelling: Hoeness), (born 5 January 1952) was a German football (soccer) player and is now general manager of the football club Bayern Munich. ...


The finals of three major FIFA competitions have gone to penalty shootouts. The first two of these took place in the same stadium, the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, USA. The International Federation of Football Association (French: ), commonly known by its acronym, FIFA, is the international governing body of association football. ... The Rose Bowl is a stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, California. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...

Goalkeepers have been known to win shootouts by their kicking. For example, in a Euro 2004 quarterfinal, Portugal goalkeeper Ricardo Pereira saved a kick (without gloves) from England's Darius Vassell, and then scored the winning shot. [6] Another example is Vélez Sársfield's José Luis Chilavert in the Copa Libertadores 1994 finals. Qualifying countries The 1994 FIFA World Cup, the 15th staging of the FIFA World Cup, was held in the United States from June 17 to July 17, 1994. ... The FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 was held in the United States and won by the host team. ... Brandi Denise Chastain (born July 21, 1968) is a former soccer player, who was on the U.S. womens national soccer team from 1991 to 2004 and the San Jose CyberRays of the WUSA (2001-2003). ... Qualifying countries The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the eighteenth instance of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international association football world championship tournament. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ... Ricardo Pereira, usually referred to simply as Ricardo (pron. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Darius Vassell (born 13 June 1980 to Jamaican parents in Sutton Coldfield) is an English international footballer who plays club football in the Premiership at Manchester City. ... For the barrio in Buenos Aires, see Vélez Sársfield (barrio) For the football club from Bosnia-Herzegovina, see Velež Mostar For the writer, see Dalmacio Vélez Sársfield Club Atlético Vélez Sársfield is an Argentine sports club best known for its football team, based... José Luis Félix Chilavert (born July 27, 1965 in Luque, Paraguay) is a former football goalkeeper. ... Copa Libertadores 1994 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


On 31 August 2005, a new British record was established when a shootout between Tunbridge Wells and Littlehampton Town involved 40 kicks being taken. [7] is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tunbridge Wells F.C. is football club based in Kent, England. ... Littlehampton Town F.C. is a football club based in Worthing, England. ...


In the FA Cup penalty kicks were introduced in the 1991–92 season to decide matches still level after a replay and extra time, replacing a series of replays that in the past had led to fixture disruption, especially disliked by the top clubs. Two first round ties that season became the first FA Cup ties to be decided on penalties (Rotherham United beat Scunthorpe United and Colchester United beat Exeter City).[1] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The 1991-92 season was the 112th season of competitive football in England. ... Rotherham United F.C. is an English football club from Rotherham, South Yorkshire, that plays in Football Leagues fourth tier, League Two. ... Scunthorpe United F.C. are an English football team based in the town of Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire, England. ... Colchester United Football Club are an English football team who, after finishing 2nd in League One for the 2005/6 season are competing in the Championship in 2006/07, for the first time in their history. ... Exeter City Football Club are an English football club, based in Exeter, who have played in the Football League for most of its history, but now play in the Blue Square Premier League. ...


A penalty shootout was first used in the FA Cup final in 2005, when Arsenal beat Manchester United 5-4. [8] The following year, Liverpool beat West Ham United in the FA Cup final's second ever penalty shootout. [9] For information on FA Cup Final Referees, see FA Cup Final Referees. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ...


The Community Shield was also settled using penalties, following the normal 90 minutes of play, but no extra time. Manchester United have twice won the shield via a shootout, beating Arsenal in 2003 and Chelsea in 2007. On the latter occasion goalkeeper Edwin van der Sar saved three Chelsea penalties. For the rugby league competition, see Charity Shield (rugby league) The Football Association Community Shield (formerly the Charity Shield) is an English association football trophy contested in an annual match between the champions of the FA Premier League and the winners of the FA Cup. ... Manchester United Football Club are a world-famous English football club, based at the Old Trafford stadium in Trafford, Greater Manchester, and are one of the most popular sports clubs in the world, with over 50 million supporters worldwide. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Chelsea Football Club (also known as The Blues or previously The Pensioners) are an English professional football club based in west London. ... Edwin van der Sar (born October 29, 1970 in Voorhout, Netherlands) is a professional Dutch footballer who plays as a goalkeeper. ...


On 16 November 2005, a place in the World Cup was directly determined by a penalty shootout for the first time. The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualifying playoff between Australia and Uruguay ended 1–1 on aggregate, with Uruguay winning the first leg 1–0 at home and Australia winning the second leg at home by the same score. A scoreless 30 minutes of extra time was followed by a shootout, which Australia won 4–2. November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Qualifying countries The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the eighteenth instance of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international association football world championship tournament. ... The Football World Cup 2006 - Oceania - South America Qualification Playoff was a home and away playoff between the following teams: The winners of the Oceania qualifying tournament, Australia The fifth placed team from the South American qualifying tournament, Uruguay. ... Extra time is an additional period played at the end of some games of football (soccer) if the score is tied after the two standard periods (halves) of play. ...


On 20 June 2007, a new international record was established[citation needed]. The semi final of the European U21-championships in Heerenveen between The Netherlands U21 and England U21 finished in 1-1. 32 penalties had to be taken before the tie was decided. The Netherlands U21 won 13-12. is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Heerenveen ( (help· info), Frisian: It Hearrenfean) is a municipality and a town in the province of Friesland, in the north of the Netherlands. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Netherlands national football team. ... First International England U-21 0-0 Wales U-21 (Molineux, Wolverhampton; December 15, 1976) Largest win England U-21 8-1 Finland U-21 (Boothferry Park, Hull; October 12, 1977) Worst defeat Romania U-21 4-0 England U-21 (Ploieşti, Romania; October 14, 1980) & England U-21...


Statistics

Below are the overall penalty shootout records of countries at major tournaments. The table is ordered by significant success rate (teams that participated in at least four penalty shootouts are shown at the top), followed by the number of shootouts won.

Country World Cup
(Won-Lost)
Euro
(Won-Lost)
Copa América
(Won-Lost)
Conf.
(Won-Lost)
Total
(Won-Lost)
% Won
Flag of Germany Germany 4-0 1-1 - - 5-1 83%
Flag of Argentina Argentina 3-1 - 4-2 1-0 8-3 73%
Flag of Brazil Brazil 2-1 - 3-2 - 5-3 63%
Flag of France France 2-2 1-1 - - 3-3 50%
Flag of Uruguay Uruguay - - 3-3 - 3-3 50%
Flag of Spain Spain 1-2 1-1 - - 2-3 40%
Flag of Mexico Mexico 0-2 - 2-1 1-2 3-5 37%
Flag of Italy Italy 1-3 1-1 - - 2-4 33%
Flag of Netherlands Netherlands 0-1 1-3 - - 1-4 20%
Flag of England England 0-3 1-2 - - 1-5 17%
Flag of Portugal Portugal 1-0 1-0 - - 2-0 100%
Flag of Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia - 2-0 - - 2-0 100%
Flag of Belgium Belgium 1-0 - - - 1-0 100%
Flag of Bulgaria Bulgaria 1-0 - - - 1-0 100%
Flag of South Korea Korea Republic 1-0 - - - 1-0 100%
Flag of Ukraine Ukraine 1-0 - - - 1-0 100%
Flag of Czech Republic Czech Republic - 1-0 - - 1-0 100%
Flag of Honduras Honduras - - 1-0 - 1-0 100%
Flag of United States USA - - 1-0 - 1-0 100%
Flag of Colombia Colombia - - 2-1 - 2-1 67%
Flag of Denmark Denmark - 1-1 - 1-0 2-1 67%
Flag of Nigeria Nigeria - - - 2-1 2-1 67%
Flag of Ireland Republic of Ireland 1-1 - - - 1-1 50%
Flag of Sweden Sweden 1-0 0-1 - - 1-1 50%
Flag of Chile Chile - - 0-1 - 0-1 0%
Flag of Ecuador Ecuador - - 0-1 - 0-1 0%
Flag of Peru Peru - - 0-1 - 0-1 0%
Flag of Yugoslavia Yugoslavia 0-1 - - - 0-1 0%
Flag of Switzerland Switzerland 0-1 - - - 0-1 0%
Flag of Paraguay Paraguay - - 0-2 - 0-2 0%
Flag of Romania Romania 0-2 - - - 0-2 0%

The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup or the Soccer World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international football competition contested by the mens national football teams of the member nations of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA... The UEFA European Championship is the main football competition of the mens national football teams governed by the UEFA. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the European Nations Cup, changing to the name European Football Championship... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The Confederations Cup The FIFA Confederations Cup is a football (soccer) tournament for national teams, held every four years (previously every two years) by FIFA. It is contested by the winners of each of the six FIFA confederation championships (CAF, CONMEBOL, UEFA, AFC, OFC, CONCACAF), along with the FIFA World... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uruguay. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Mexico. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Czechoslovakia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Honduras. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Colombia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Nigeria. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Chile. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Peru. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_SFR_Yugoslavia. ... First international  Czechoslovakia 7 - 0 Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, Macedonians and Slovenes (Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920) Last International  Netherlands 2 - 0 Yugoslavia (Amsterdam, Netherlands; 25 March 1992) Biggest win Yugoslavia 10 - 1 India  (Helsinki, Finland; 15 July 1952) Yugoslavia 9 - 0 Zaire  (Gelsenkirchen, Germany; 18 June 1974) Biggest defeat... Image File history File links Flag_of_Switzerland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Paraguay. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ...

Criticisms and alternatives

Penalty shootouts have been seen as variously thrilling and as an unsatisfactory way to decide a football match. Various alternatives have been proposed.


Golden goal and silver goal methods to encourage a result without resort to penalties have been tried. However, the International Football Association Board (IFAB) discontinued their use in 2004. These were not seen as a success, as they led to negative, defensive play rather than encouraging the teams to try to score goals. The reason being that the fear of having a goal scored against them seemed more important than trying to score a goal themselves. The golden goal was a method used in football to decide the winner of games in elimination matches which end in a draw after the end of ordinary time (90 minutes). ... Silver goal was a method used in association football to decide the result of games in elimination matches which end in a draw after the end of the ordinary time. ... The International Football Association Board (IFAB) (also known as or simply The International Board) is the body that determines the Laws of the Game of association football (soccer). ...


In the event of a draw, current alternatives to penalty shootouts include replaying (where possible) a match that has ended in a draw (as still occurs in the quarter-finals and earlier rounds of the English FA Cup). This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Other suggestions have included using elements of match play such as most shots on goal, most corner kicks awarded, fewest cautions and sendings-off, or having ongoing extra time with teams compelled to remove players at progressive intervals [10]. These proposals have not yet been authorised by the IFAB however, in June 2007 Sepp Blatter stated that he wants no more penalty shootouts in world cup finals [11] In association football a corner kick is awarded if the defensive team is the last to touch the ball before it crosses its own goal line (goal line of the end of the field it is defending) outside of the goal itself (whether by kicking or off the hands of... Misconduct in football (soccer) is any conduct by a player which is deemed by the referee to warrant a disciplinary sanction (caution or dismissal) in accordance with Law 12 the Laws of the Game. ... Extra time is an additional period played at the end of some games of football (soccer) if the score is tied after the two standard periods (halves) of play. ... The International Football Association Board (IFAB) is the body that determines the Laws of the Game of association football (soccer). ... Joseph Blatter (center), Luís Inácio Lula da Silva (right) and Ricardo Teixeira (seated) in Brasília, September 28, 2006. ...


The overtime shootout in football and ice hockey was ranked Number one overall in the book "Glow Pucks & 10-Cent Beer: The 101 Worst Ideas in Sports History" by author Greg Wyshynski (Taylor Trade 2006), although he mainly concentrated his critique on the ice hockey shootout and suggested replacing penalty shots with corner kicks.


American experiments

The North American Soccer League in the 1970s and then Major League Soccer in the 1990s experimented with a variation of the shootout procedure. A shootout consisted of a player starting with the ball 35 yards from the goal and having five seconds to try and score a goal, with as many touches as he wished in that time span. This procedure is similar to that used in an ice hockey penalty shot. As with a standard shootout, this variation used a best-of-five-kicks model, and if the score was still level, the tiebreaker would head to an extra round of one attempt per team. The MLS abandoned this experiment in 2000. North American Soccer League or (NASL) was a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada that operated from 1968 to 1984. ... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ... In ice hockey, a penalty shot is a type of penalty awarded when a team loses a clear scoring opportunity because of a foul committed by an opposing player. ...


See also

A penalty shootout is a method of determining a winner in sports matches which would have otherwise been drawn or tied. ...

Bibliography

  • On Penalties by Andrew Anthony (ISBN 0-224-06116-X)

External links

  • RSSSF — Penalty Shootout Trivia

  Results from FactBites:
 
THE RULES OF SOCCER FOOTBALL (8437 words)
A regulation Football is 720–730 mm in circumference, and 545–555 mm transverse circumference, and inflated to a pressure of 62–76Kpa.
Football is played at a professional level all over the world, and millions of people regularly go to football stadia to follow their favourite team, whilst millions more avidly watch the game on television.
Football is generally a free-flowing game with the ball in play at all times except when the ball has left the field of play by wholly crossing over a boundary line (either on the ground or in the air), or play has been stopped by the referee.
Penalty shootout (football) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1740 words)
Penalty shootouts (officially referred to as kicks from the penalty mark) are a method sometimes used to decide which team progresses to the next stage of a tournament (or wins the tournament) following a draw in a game of association football.
Kicks during a shootout are governed by different rules from penalty kicks, which are part of normal play during a match.
In the event of a draw, current alternatives to penalty shootouts include replaying (where possible) a match that has ended in a tie (as still occurs in the quarter-finals and earlier rounds of the English FA Cup).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m