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Encyclopedia > Pen name

A pen name, nom de plume, or literary double, is a pseudonym adopted by an author or their publishers to conceal their identity. A pen name may be used if a writer's real name is likely to be confused with the name of another writer or notable individual, or if their real name is deemed to be unsuitable. Authors who write in fiction and non-fiction, or in different genres, may use pen names to avoid confusing their readers, as in the case mathematician Charles Dodgson, who wrote fantasy novels under the pen name Lewis Carroll. Some female authors use male pen names, particularly in the 19th century, when writing was a male-dominated profession. A pseudonym may also be used to hide the identity of the author, as in the case of exposé books about espionage or crime, or explicit erotic fiction. For other uses, see Alias. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... An exposé is an article or book intended to reveal shocking or surprising information. ... Spy and Secret agent redirect here. ...

Contents

Western literature

Authors who regularly write in several genres use different pen names for each genre. Romance writer Nora Roberts writes erotic thrillers under the pen name J.D. Robb, and Samuel Langhorne Clemens used the aliases "Mark Twain" and "Sieur Louis de Conte" for different works. Similarly, an author who writes both fiction and non-fiction (such as the mathematician and fantasy writer Charles Dodgson, who wrote as Lewis Carroll, or the American television commentator Bill O'Reilly, who wrote a thriller under a pen name) may use a pseudonym for fiction writing. A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... Eleanor Marie Robertson (b. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humanist,[2] humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (IPA: ) (27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll (), was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman and photographer. ... It has been suggested that Bill OReilly political beliefs and points of view be merged into this article or section. ...


Occasionally a pen name is employed to avoid overexposure. Prolific authors for pulp magazines often had two and sometimes three short stories appearing in one issue of a magazine; the editor would create several fictitious author names to hide this from readers. Robert Heinlein wrote stories under pseudonyms so that more of his works in could be published in a single magazine. Sometimes a pen name is used because an author believes that their name does not suit the genre they are writing in. This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ...


Western novelist Pearl Gray dropped his first name and changed the spelling of his last name to become Zane Grey, because he believed that his real name did not suit the Western genre. Stephen King wrote four novels under the name of Richard Bachman, because he feared that his books were being sold for his name rather than his actual writing. Eventually, after critics found a large number of similarities between their styles, publishers revealed Bachman's true identity. Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and pulp fiction that presented an idealized image of the rugged Old West. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Richard Bachmans author photo. ...


C. S. Lewis used two different pseudonyms for different reasons. Before his conversion to Christianity, he published a collection of poems (Spirits in Bondage) and a narrative poem (Dymer) under the pen name "Clive Hamilton", to avoid harming his reputation as a don at Oxford University. His book entitled A Grief Observed, which describes his experience of bereavement, was originally released it under the pseudonym "N.W. Clerk". Clive Staples Jack Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... In universities, especially traditiona colleageate universities such as Oxford and Cambridge, a don is traditionally, a fellow or tutor of a college. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


Female authors

Some female authors have used male pen names to ensure that their works were accepted by publishers or taken seriously by the public. Mary Ann Evans wrote under the pen name George Eliot, and Charlotte Brontë published under the name Currer Bell. Karen Blixen wrote the very successful "Out of Africa" under the pen name "Isak Dinesen". More recently, women who write in genres normally written by men may choose to use a neutral pen name, such as J.D. Robb or K. A. Applegate. Along the same lines, author Robin Hobb chose that androgynous pen name when she set out to write a fantasy trilogy featuring a male leading character. Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... Baroness Karen von Blixen-Finecke (April 17, 1885 – September 7, 1962), née Karen Dinesen, was a Danish author also known under her pen name Isak Dinesen. ... For the 1985 film based on this novel, see Out of Africa (film). ... Katherine Alice Applegate is the credited author of the Animorphs, Remnants, and Everworld book series, although many of these books are ghostwritten by other authors. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Robin Hobb is the pen name of Margaret Astrid Lindholm Ogden (born 1952 in California). ...


"House" names

In some forms of fiction, the pen name adopted is the name of the lead character, to suggest to the reader that the book is a fictional autobiography. Daniel Handler used the pseudonym Lemony Snicket to make his books appear to be records of the lives of the Baudelaires. Some series fiction is published under one pen name even though more than one author may have contributed to the series. In some cases the first books in the series were written by one writer, but subsequent books were written by ghost writers. For instance, many of the later books in the The Saint adventure series were not written by Leslie Charteris, the originator of the series. Similarly, Nancy Drew mystery books are published as though they were written by "Carolyn Keene", although many authors have been involved. Daniel Handler (born February 28, 1970), is an American author, screenwriter, and accordionist. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... This article is about a ghostwriter, the type of writer. ... Simon Templar is a fictional character known as The Saint in a long-running series of books by Leslie Charteris published between 1928 and 1963. ... Leslie Charteris (May 12, 1907, Singapore–April 15, 1993), born Leslie Charles Bowyer-Yin, was a half-Chinese, half English author of primarily mystery fiction, as well as a screenwriter. ... For the film, see Nancy Drew (2007 film). ...


Collaborative authors may choose to have their works published under a single pen name. Frederic Dannay and Manfred B. Lee published their mystery novels and stories under the pen name Ellery Queen (and, also under the Ellery Queen name, published the work of other authors who had been hired to ghost-write novels). The writers who wrote Atlanta Nights, a deliberately badly-written book meant to expose the publishing firm PublishAmerica, used the pen name Travis Tea. Sometimes multiple authors will write related books under the same pseudonym; examples include Nicolas Bourbaki in non-fiction and T. H. Lain in fiction. Edward Gorey had dozens of pseudonyms, each one an anagram of his real name. Frederic Dannay (left), with James Yaffe (1943) Ellery Queen is both a fictional character and a pseudonym used by two American cousins from Brooklyn, New York: Daniel (David) Nathan, alias Frederic Dannay (October 20, 1905–September 3, 1982) and Manford (Emanuel) Lepofsky, alias Manfred Bennington Lee (January 11, 1905–April... Frederic Dannay (left), with James Yaffe (1943) Ellery Queen is both a fictional character and a pseudonym used by two American cousins from Brooklyn, New York: Daniel (David) Nathan, alias Frederic Dannay (October 20, 1905–September 3, 1982) and Manford (Emanuel) Lepofsky, alias Manfred Bennington Lee (January 11, 1905–April... Atlanta Nights is a collaborative novel created by a group of science fiction and fantasy authors, with the express purpose of producing an unpublishably bad piece of work and testing whether publishing firm PublishAmerica would still accept it, which they did. ... PublishAmerica is a Maryland-based book publisher founded in 1999 by Lawrence Alvin Larry Clopper III and Willem Meiners. ... This article is about the group of mathematicians named Nicolas Bourbaki. ... T. H. Lain was a collective pseudonym used by eight separate authors writing under Wizards of the Coasts Dungeons & Dragons novels imprint. ... Edward St. ... For the game, see Anagrams. ...


Pseudepigraphy

Pseudepigraphy is a particular form of pseudonym or pen name in which authors adopt the name of well-known figures as the publicly ascribed author to attain greater interest or credibility for the work. In some cases the pseudepigraphy is the result of pious tradition. It was traditionally employed in the Western world from Hellenistic times all the way up to the Middle Ages, particularly in theology and scripture. Examples include Pseudo-Dionysius or, according to some academic scholars, the ascribed Solomonic authorship of the Song of Songs. Occident redirects here. ... The Hellenistic period (4th - 1st c. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Many religions and spiritual movements hold certain written texts (or series of spoken legends not traditionally written down) to be sacred. ... Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite is the name scholars have given to an anonymous theologian and philosopher of the 5th century, who wrote a collection of books (Corpus Areopagiticum) falsely ascribed to the Dionysius mentioned in Acts 17:34. ... This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Song of Solomon is also the title of a novel by Toni Morrison. ...


Concealment of identity

A pseudonym may also be used to protect the writer for exposé books about espionage or crime. Andy McNab, a former SAS soldier used a pseudonym for his book about a failed SAS mission titled Bravo Two Zero. Ibn Warraq has been used by dissident Muslim authors. Author Brian O'Nolan was forced to use the pen names "Flann O'Brien" and "Myles na gCopaleen" because at the time Irish civil servants were not allowed to publish works under their own names. Ian MacNab DCM MM (born December 28, 1959) is a British former soldier turned novelist. ... See also Australian Special Air Service Regiment and New Zealand Special Air Service: The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... Bravo Two Zero (B20) was the callsign of an eight-man British Special Air Service (SAS) patrol that was tasked with observing the M.S.R. (Main Supply Route) between Baghdad and north-west Iraq and finding and destroying Iraqi Scud missile launchers and their fibre optic comms lines in... Ibn Warraq is the pen name of an author of several books on Islam. ... Brian ONolan (Irish: Brian Ó Núalláin) (October 5, 1911 – April 1, 1966) was an Irish novelist and satirist, best known for his novels An Béal Bocht, At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman written under the nom de plume Flann OBrien. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The Histoire d'O (The Story of O), an erotic novel of sadomasochism and sexual slavery, was written by an editorial secretary with a reputation of near-prudery who used the pseudonym Pauline Réage. One version of the Roissy triskelion ring described in the book Movie-style Ring of O, as sold in Europe Histoire dO (English title: Story of O) is an erotic novel published in 1954 about sadomasochism by French author Anne Desclos under the pen name Pauline Réage. ... One version of the Roissy triskelion ring described in the book Movie-style Ring of O, as sold in Europe Histoire dO (English title: Story of O) is an erotic novel published in 1954 about sadomasochism by French author Anne Desclos under the pen name Pauline Réage. ... Eroticism is an aesthetic focused on sexual desire, especially the feelings of anticipation of sexual activity. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Sexual slavery is a special case of slavery which includes various different practices: forced prostitution single-owner sexual slavery ritual slavery, sometimes associated with traditional religious practices slavery for primarily non-sexual purposes where sex is common or permissible In general, the nature of slavery means that the slave is... Pauline Réage, pseudonym of Anne Desclos (September 23, 1907 - April 27, 1998), was a French author. ...


Non-western cultures

Persian and Urdu poetry

Note: List of Urdu language poets provides pen names for a range of Urdu poets.

A shâ'er (a poet who writes she'rs in Urdu or Persian) almost always has a takhallus, a pen name, traditionally placed at the end of the name when referring to the poet by his full name. For example Hafez is a pen-name for Shams al-Din, and thus the usual way to refer to him would be Shams al-Din Hafez or just Hafez. Mirza Asadullah Beg Khan (his official name and title) is referred to as Mirza Asadullah Khan Ghalib, or just Mirza Ghalib. Listed below are major Urdu poets, sorted by date of birth. ... Urdu ( , , trans. ... Sappho and Alcaeus of Mytilene, by Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1881). ... Sher or Sher (Arabic: شعر) is the common word for poem in Arabic and Persian. ... Urdu ( , , trans. ... Farsi redirects here. ... Like other languages, the history of Urdu poetry does not have a firm starting point and shares origins and influences with other linguistic traditions within the Urdu-Hindi-Hindustani mix. ... Hafez, detail of an illumination in a Persian manuscript of the Divan of Hafez, 18th century. ... Mirza Asadullah Baig Khan (Urdu/Persian: مرزا اسد اللہ خان ), pen-name Ghalib (Urdu/Persian: غالب, Ä¡hālib) and Asad (former pen-name)(27 December 1796 — 15 February 1869), was an all time great classical Urdu and Persian poet of the subcontinent. ... Mirza Asadullah Baig Khan (Urdu/Persian: مرزا اسد اللہ خان ), pen-name Ghalib (Urdu/Persian: غالب, Ä¡hālib) and Asad (former pen-name)(27 December 1796 — 15 February 1869), was an all time great classical Urdu and Persian poet of the subcontinent. ...


India

In Indian Languages, writers put it at the end of their names, like Ramdhari Singh 'Dinkar'. Sometimes they also write under their pen name without their actual name like Firaq Gorakhpuri. Ramdhari Singh Dinkar (रामधारी सिंह दिनकर) (September 23, 1908 - April 24, 1974) was an Indian Hindi poet, who is considered as one of the most important modern Hindi poets. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Japan

Japanese poets who write haiku often use a haiga or penname. The famous haiku poet Matsuo Bashō had used fifteen different haiga before he became fond of a banana plant (bashō) that had been given to him by a disciple and started using it as his penname at the age of 38. For the operating system, see Haiku (operating system). ... A statue of Bashō in Hiraizumi, Iwate. ...


Similar to a pen name, Japanese artists usually have a or art-name, which might change a number of times during their career.In some cases, artists adopted different at different stages of their career, usually to mark significant changes in their life. One of the most extreme examples of this is Hokusai, who in the period 1798 to 1806 alone used no fewer than six. Manga artist Ogure Ito uses the pen name 'OH! great' because his real name Ogure Ito is roughly how the Japanese pronounce "oh great." An artist is someone who employs creative talent to produce works of art. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Katsushika Hokusai, (葛飾北斎), (1760—1849[1]), was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period . ... Year 1798 (MDCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Mangaka ) is the Japanese word for a comic artist. ...


Etymology

Despite the use of French words in the name Nom de plume, the term did not originate in France. H. W. Fowler and F. G. Fowler, in The King's English [1] state that the term nom de plume "evolved" in Britain, where people wanting a "literary" phrase, failed to understand the term nom de guerre, which already existed in French. Since guerre means war in French, nom de guerre did not make sense to the British, who did not understand the French metaphor. The term was later exported to France (H. W. Fowler's Modern English Usage). See French-language expression, although amongst French speakers pseudonyme is much more common. Henry Watson Fowler (10 March 1858 - 26 December 1933) was an English schoolmaster, lexicographer and commentator on usage, notable for both Fowlers Modern English Usage (first published 1926) and his work on the Concise Oxford Dictionary. ... The Kings English is a book on English usage and grammar. ... Here are some examples of French words and phrases used by English speakers. ...


See also

A stage name, also called a screen name, is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers such as actors, comedians, musicians, djs, clowns, and professional wrestlers. ... Cha can also refer to a Latin American dance, also called the Cha-cha-cha. ... This article gives a list of pseudonyms, in various categories. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Pseudepigrapha (Greek pseudos = false, epi = after, later and grapha = writing (or writings), latterly or falsely attributed, or down right forged works, describes texts whose claimed authorship is unfounded in actuality. ... For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ... This is a list of pen names used by notable people. ...

References

  1. ^ Ch. 1, p. 43 (Foreign Words, #5),

External links

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
pen-name | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon (129 words)
A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author.
Nom de plume is a French-language expression.Different authors take their pen names for different reasons.
The Brontë sisters adopted male names as they felt they would either not be published at all, or not taken seriously as women authors.
Pen name - definition of Pen name in Encyclopedia (1163 words)
A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author.
Some authors take on pen names to conceal their identity: for example the Brontes, who felt they would either not be published at all, or not taken seriously as women authors.
Pseudonyms are not always secret: Stendhal's real name was known: at least one critic disparaged his pen name as an affectation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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