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Encyclopedia > Peggy Lee
Peggy Lee
Peggy Lee in the 1943 film Stage Door Canteen.
Peggy Lee in the 1943 film Stage Door Canteen.
Background information
Birth name Norma Deloris Egstrom
Born May 26, 1920
Origin Jamestown, North Dakota
Died January 21, 2002 (aged 81)
Genre(s) Traditional Pop, Jazz
Occupation(s) Singer, Actress
Years active 19411996
Label(s) Decca Records
Capitol Records
Associated
acts
Jo Stafford, Patti Page, Rosemary Clooney

Peggy Lee (May 26, 1920January 21, 2002) was an American jazz and traditional pop singer and songwriter and Oscar-nominated performer. She was born Norma Deloris Egstrom and was famous for her "soft and cool" singing style. Though she recorded dozens of hit songs (many of which she wrote or cowrote), Lee might be best known for her interpretation of the Davenport/Cooley composition "Fever" and the song written by her and Dave Barbour, "It's a Good Day." Image File history File links PeggyLeeStageDoorCanteen. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Jamestown is a city in Stutsman County, North Dakota in the United States. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Jo Stafford (born Jo Elizabeth Stafford November 12, 1917, in Coalinga, California) is an American pop singer whose career spanned the late 1930s through the early 1960s. ... Patti Page (born Clara Ann Fowler on November 8, 1927 in Claremore, Oklahoma) is one of the best-known female singers in traditional pop music. ... Rosemary Clooney (May 23, 1928 – June 29, 2002) was an American popular singer and actress. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... mainstream pop music Traditional pop music is a neologism for Western popular music which encompasses music that succeeded big band music and preceded rock and roll as the most popular kind of music in the United States, most of Europe, and some other parts of the world. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Fever is a song credited to Eddie Cooley and John Davenport (a pseudonym for Otis Blackwell). ... Its a Good Day is a popular song. ...

Contents

Early life

Lee was born Norma Deloris Egstrom in Jamestown, North Dakota, the youngest child of seven. After her mother died, her father remarried and her stepmother was very cruel to her. She took solace in the music she heard on the radio. She first sang professionally with KOVC radio in Valley City, North Dakota. She soon landed her own series on a radio show sponsored by a local restaurant that paid her "salary" in food. Both during and after her high school years, she took whatever jobs she could find, waitressing and singing for paltry sums on other local stations. Radio personality Ken Kennedy (actual name: Ken Sydness), of WDAY in Fargo (the most widely listened to station in North Dakota) changed her name from Norma to Peggy Lee. Tiring of the abuse from her stepmother, she left home and traveled to Los Angeles at the age of 17. Jamestown is a city in Stutsman County, North Dakota in the United States. ... Valley City is a city located in Barnes County, North Dakota. ... Location in North Dakota Coordinates: Country United States State North Dakota County Cass County Founded 1871 Mayor Dennis Walaker Area    - City 98. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ...


She returned to North Dakota for a tonsillectomy and, while there, lined up a gig at The Buttery Room, a nightclub in the Ambassador Hotel West in Chicago, home of Benny Goodman, the jazz clarinetist and band leader. According to Lee, "Benny's then-fiance, Lady Alice Duckworth, came into the Buttery, and she was very impressed. So the next evening she brought Benny in, because they were looking for replacement for Helen Forrest. "And although I didn't know, I was it. He was looking at me strangely, I thought, but it was just his preoccupied way of looking. I thought that he didn't like me at first, but it just was that he was preoccupied with what he was hearing." She joined his band in 1941 and stayed for two years, with the band then at the height of its popularity. Throat after tonsillectomy A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure in which the tonsils are removed. ... Nickname: Motto: “Urbs in Horto” (Latin: “City in a Garden”), “I Will” Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Helen Forrests hit single I Had the Craziest Dream. ...


Recording career

In early 1942, Lee had her first # 1 hit, "Somebody Else Is Taking My Place," followed by 1943's "Why Don't You Do Right?," which sold over a million copies and made her famous. She sang with Goodman in two 1943 films, Stage Door Canteen and The Powers Girl. Why Dont You Do Right? is Peggy Lees first hit song, recorded July 27, 1942 in New York with Benny Goodman. ... Stage Door Canteen is a 1943 film. ...


In March 1943, Lee married Dave Barbour, the guitarist in Goodman's band. Peggy said, "David joined Benny's band and there was a ruling that no one should fraternize with the girl singer. But I fell in love with David the first time I heard him play, and so I married him. Benny then fired David, so I quit, too. Benny and I made up, although David didn't play with him anymore. Benny stuck to his rule. I think that's not too bad a rule, but you can't help falling in love with somebody."


When Lee and Barbour left the band, the idea was that he would work in the studios and she would keep house and raise their daughter, Nicki. But she drifted back towards songwriting and occasional recording sessions for the fledgling Capitol Records in 1944, for whom she produced a long string of hits, many of them with lyrics and music by Lee and Barbour, including "I Don't Know Enough About You" and "It's a Good Day" (1946). With the release of the smash-hit #1-selling record of 1948, "Mañana," her "retirement" was over. Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the...


In 1948, she joined Perry Como and Jo Stafford as one of the rotating hosts of the NBC musical radio program Chesterfield Supper Club. Pierino Ronaldo Perry Como (May 18, 1912 – May 12, 2001) was an Italian American crooner during the latter half of the 20th century. ... Jo Stafford (born Jo Elizabeth Stafford November 12, 1917, in Coalinga, California) is an American pop singer whose career spanned the late 1930s through the early 1960s. ... The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Chesterfield Supper Club was an NBC musical variety radio program (1944-50) and was also broadcast as a television program (1948-50). ...


She left Capitol for a few years in the early 1950s, but returned in 1957. She is most famous for her cover version of the Little Willie John hit "Fever" and her rendition of Leiber and Stoller's "Is That All There Is?" Her relationship with the Capitol label spanned almost three decades, aside from her brief but artistically rich detour (1952-1956) at Decca Records, where she recorded one of her most acclaimed albums Black Coffee (1956). While recording for Decca, Lee had hit singles with the songs "Lover" and "Mr. Wonderful." In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Little Willie John (November 15, 1937 – May 26, 1968) is an African-American smooth RnB singer of the 1950s and early 1960s. ... Fever is a song credited to Eddie Cooley and John Davenport (a pseudonym for Otis Blackwell). ... Mike Stoller, Elvis Presley & Jerry Leiber Jerry Leiber (born April 25, 1933) and Mike Stoller (born March 13, 1933) are among the most influential songwriters and music producers in post-World War II popular music. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Black Coffee is a 1953 album (see 1953 in music) album by the American jazz singer Peggy Lee. ...


Songwriting

She was also known as a songwriter with such hits as the songs from the Disney movie Lady and the Tramp, which she also sang. Her many songwriting collaborators, in addition to Barbour, included Laurindo Almeida, Harold Arlen, Sonny Burke, Cy Coleman, Gene DiNovi, Duke Ellington, Dave Grusin, Dick Hazard, Quincy Jones, Francis Lai, Jack Marshall, Johnny Mandel, Marian McPartland, Willard Robison, Lalo Schifrin, Hubie Wheeler, and Victor Young. Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution/RKO Radio Pictures. ... Laurindo Almeida (born September 2, 1917, São Paulo, Brazil–died July 26, 1995, Van Nuys, California) was a Brazilian classical guitarist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sonny Burke (Joseph Francis Burke) was born March 22, 1914 in Scranton, Pennsylvania and died May 31, 1980. ... Cy Coleman (June 14, 1929 - November 18, 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... Edward Kennedy “Duke” Ellington (April 29, 1899–May 24, 1974) was an American jazz composer, pianist, and band leader who has been one of the most influential figures in jazz, if not in all American music. ... David Grusin (born June 26, 1934 in Littleton, Colorado) is a jazz pianist, composer, and arranger whose works in films and TV have garnered him numerous awards. ... Quincy Delightt Jones Jr. ... Francis Lai (born April 26, 1932 in Nice, Alpes-Maritimes, France) is a composer noted for his film scores. ... Right Honourable Sir John Ross Marshall GBE (March 5, 1912 – August 30, 1988), generally known as Jack Marshall, was a New Zealand politician. ... Johnny Mandel (born 23 November 1925 in New York) is an American composer and arranger of popular songs, film music and jazz. ... Marian McPartland, born Margaret Marian Turner on March 21, 1918 in England near Slough, Buckinghamshire, is a British jazz pianist. ... Willard Robison (born September 18, 1894 - June 24, 1968) was an American composer of popular song. ... Lalo Schifrin Lalo Schifrin (born on June 21, 1932) is an Argentine Jewish pianist and composer, most famous for composing the burning-fuse theme tune from the Mission:Impossible television series. ... Victor Young (August 8, 1900 - November 10, 1956) was an Jewish-American composer, violinist and conducter. ...


During a time when youths began turning to rock'n'roll, she was one of the mainstays of Capitol recordings. From 1957 until her final disc for the company in 1972, she routinely produced a steady stream of two or three albums per year. Rock and roll (also spelled rock n roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ...


Acting career

Lee also acted in several films. In 1952, she played opposite Danny Thomas in a remake of the early Al Jolson film, The Jazz Singer. In 1955, she played a despondent, alcoholic blues singer in Pete Kelly's Blues (1955), for which she was nominated for an Oscar. Danny Thomas (January 6, 1914 - February 6, 1991) was an American nightclub comedian and television and film actor of Lebanese Maronite Catholic descent. ... Al Jolson (born Asa Yoelson, May 26, 1886 – October 23, 1950) was an acclaimed European singer and actor whose career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. ... The Jazz Singer (1952) is the remake of the infamous 1927 talking picture, The Jazz Singer. ... King Alcohol and his Prime Minister circa 1820 Alcoholism is the consumption of or preoccupation with alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the alcoholics normal personal, family, social, or work life. ... Pete Kellys Blues is a 1955 film directed by Jack Webb, who also acts in it, along with Janet Leigh and Peggy Lee, who plays an alcoholic jazz singer. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...


Lee was nominated for 12 Grammy Awards, winning Best Contemporary Vocal Performance for her 1969 hit "Is That All There Is?" In 1995 she was given the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance has been awarded since 1966. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


In the early 1990s, she retained famed entertainment attorney Neil Papiano, who, on her behalf, successfully sued Disney for royalties on Lady and the Tramp. Lee's lawsuit claimed that she was due royalties for video tapes, a technology that did not exist when she agreed to write and perform for Disney. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Retirement and death

She continued to perform into the 1990s and still mesmerized audiences and critics alike. After years of poor health, Lee died of complications from diabetes and heart attack at the age of 81. She is survived by Nicki Lee Foster, her daughter with Barbour. She is buried at the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Westwood, California. This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Cemetery view looking South-East. ... High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Another view of the Westwood skyline Westwood is a district in western Los Angeles, California, not to be confused with Westwood, California. ...


Legacy

She was not featured in Memoriam Tribute during the Academy Awards ceremony. When her family requested she be featured in the following year's ceremony, the Academy stated they did not honor requests and Lee was omitted because her contribution to film and her legacy were not deemed significant enough. The Lee family pointed out that, although she had been omitted, R&B singer/actress Aaliyah, who died a few months earlier, was included though having been in only one moderately successful film, Romeo Must Die (Queen of the Damned had yet to be released). The Academy provided no comment on the oversight. Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Romeo Must Die (2000) is an American film, an adaptation loosely based on Romeo and Juliet, directed by Andrzej Bartkowiak. ... Queen of the Damned is a 2002 film adaptation of the third novel of Anne Rices The Vampire Chronicles series, The Queen of the Damned although the film contained many plot elements from that novels predecessor, The Vampire Lestat. ...


Lee is a recipient of the state of North Dakota's Roughrider Award; the Pied Piper Award from The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP); the Presidents Award, from the Songwriters' Guild of America; the Ella Award for Lifetime Achievement, from the Society of Singers; and the Living Legacy Award, from the Women's International Center. In 1999 she was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. The Roughrider Award is an award presented by the governor of the state of North Dakota. ... The Presidents Award may mean: Gaisce - The Presidents Award, Republic of Ireland NAACP Image Award - Presidents Award, United States This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... The Society of Singers (established 1984) is a not for profit charitable organisation based in Los Angeles, California. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ...


In 2003, "There'll Be Another Spring: A Tribute to Miss Peggy Lee" was held at Carnegie Hall. Produced by recording artist Richard Barone, the sold-out event included performances by Cy Coleman, Debbie Harry, Nancy Sinatra, Rita Moreno, Marian McPartland, Chris Connor, Petula Clark and many others. In 2004, Barone brought the event to the Hollywood Bowl and Chicago's Ravinia Festival, with expanded casts including Maureen McGovern and Bea Arthur. The Carnegie Hall concert was broadcast as on NPR's "Jazz Set." Richard Barone is a musician, formerly the vocalist and leader in the New Jersey band The Bongos. ... Cy Coleman (June 14, 1929 - November 18, 2004) was an American composer, songwriter, and jazz pianist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rita Moreno on the 1962 album cover for Academy Award Winner Rita Moreno Sings Rita Moreno (born December 11, 1931 in Humacao, Puerto Rico) is an Academy Award-winning actress and the first and only Puerto Rican actress in history (as well as one of only nine people) to have... Marian McPartland, born Margaret Marian Turner on March 21, 1918 in England near Slough, Buckinghamshire, is a British jazz pianist. ... Chris Connor is one of the really great jazz singers. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born November 15, 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... Hollywood Bowl in 2005. ... The Ravinia Festival is the summer music program offered at Ravinia Park in Highland Park, Illinois. ... A former secretary, Maureen McGovern quickly became the new it singer in 1973 with the Oscar-winning Morning After. ... Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay on Maude. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ...


Biographies

  • Robert Strom, Miss Peggy Lee: A Career Chronicle, 2005, McFarland Publishing, ISBN 0-7864-1936-9
  • Peter Richmond, Fever: The Life and Music of Miss Peggy Lee, 2006, Henry Holt and Company, ISBN 0-8050-7383-3
  • Will Friedwald, Sinatra! The Song is for You, 1996, Da Capo Press & Liner Notes for The Best of Peggy Lee, The Capitol Years.

Albums

Capitol Records

  • 1948 Rendezvous with Peggy Lee (set of 78s: 6 songs)
  • 1952 Rendezvous with Peggy Lee (10-inch LP: 8 songs; 12-inch LP: 12 songs)

Decca Records

Black Coffee is a 1953 album (see 1953 in music) album by the American jazz singer Peggy Lee. ... White Christmas was Bing Crosbys third Decca long play album, recorded and originally realesed in 1954 as the soundtrack for the White Christmas. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Kaye entertaining U.S. troops at Sasebo, Japan, 25 Oct 1945 David Daniel Kaminsky, known as Danny Kaye (January 18, 1913 – March 3, 1987) was an American actor, singer and comedian. ... Songs from Pete Kellys Blues is a 1955 (see 1955 in music) soundtrack album by Peggy Lee featuring tracks by Ella Fitzgerald, and several jazz instrumentals. ... Ella Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... Black Coffee is a 1953 album (see 1953 in music) album by the American jazz singer Peggy Lee. ... Various seashells A shell is the hard, rigid outer covering, or integument, of certain animals. ... Miss Wonderful is a 1959 album (see 1959 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged and conducted by Sy Oliver. ...

Capitol Records

The Man I Love is a 1957 album (see 1957 in music) by Peggy Lee, with an orchestra arranged by Nelson Riddle, and conducted by Frank Sinatra. ... Jump for Joy is a 1959 album (see 1959 in music) by Peggy Lee, with an orchestra arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle. ... Things Are Swingin is a 1959 album (see 1959 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged and conducted by Jack Marshall. ... I Like Men! is a 1959 album (see 1959 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged and conducted by Sy Oliver. ... Beauty and the Beat! is a 1959 album (see 1959 in music) by Peggy Lee, accomapnied by the George Shearing Quartet. ... Latin ala Lee! is a 1960 album (see 1960 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Jack Marshall. ... All Aglow Again! is a 1960 compilation album (see 1960 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Jack Marshall. ... Pretty Eyes is a 1960 studio album (see 1960 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Billy May. ... Christmas Carousel is a 1960 studio album (see 1960 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Billy May. ... Olé ala Lee is a 1961 album (see 1961 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Joe Harnell. ... Basin Street East Proudly Presents Miss Peggy Lee is a live 1961 album (see 1961 in music) by Peggy Lee, arranged by Jack Marshall. ... Track Listing “As Time Goes By” Herman Hupfield 2:48 “If You Go” Geoffrey Parsons, Michel Emer 2:39 “Oh Love Hast Thou Forsaken Me” William Bowers 2:33 “Say It Isnt So” Irving Berlin 2:53 “I Wish I Didnt Love You So” Frank Loesser 2:45... Blues Cross Country is a 1962 (see 1962 in music) album by Peggy Lee, arranged by Quincy Jones. ... Sugar N Spice is a 1962 (see 1962 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Mink Jazz is a 1963 (see 1963 in music) album by Peggy Lee, arranged by Benny Carter. ... Im a Woman is a 1963 (see 1963 in music) song and album by Peggy Lee, arranged by Benny Carter. ... In Love Again! is a 1964 (see 1964 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... The first Thompson Twins album released in the U.S. The album was released in 1982 and is comprised by eight of the eleven tracks from their second album Set and two of the singles from their debut album A Product of. ... Then Was Then - Now Is Now! is a 1966 (see 1966 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Guitars A là Lee is a 1966 (see 1966 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Big $pender is a 1966 (see 1966 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Extra Special! is a 1967 (see 1967 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Somethin Groovy! is a 1967 (see 1967 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... 2 Shows Nightly is a 1968 (see 1968 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... A Natural Woman is a 1969 (see 1969 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Make It With You is a song written by David Gates and originally recorded by the Pop/Rock group that Gates was a member of, Bread. ... Norma Deloris Egstrom from Jamestown, North Dakota is a 1972 (see 1972 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ...

Post-Capitol albums

Lets Love is a 1974 (see 1974 in music) album by Peggy Lee, with the title track arranged and written by Paul McCartney. ... Mirrors is a 1975 (see 1975 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Live in London is a live 1977 (see 1977 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Close Enough for Love is a 1979 (see 1979 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Miss Peggy Lee Sings the Blues is a 1988 (see 1988 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ... Moments Like This is a 1993 (see 1993 in music) album by Peggy Lee. ...

Filmography

  • The Powers Girl (1943)
  • Stage Door Canteen (1943)
  • Banquet of Melody (1946) (short subject)
  • Jasper in a Jam (1946) (short subject) (voice)
  • Midnight Serenade (1947) (short subject)
  • Peggy Lee and the Dave Barbour Quartet (1950) (short subject)
  • Mr. Music (1950)
  • The Jazz Singer (1952)
  • Lady and the Tramp (1955) (voice)
  • Pete Kelly's Blues (1955)
  • Celebrity Art (1973) (short subject)

Jasper in a Jam is a 1946 short film in the Puppetoon Series by George Pal. ... The Jazz Singer (1952) is the remake of the infamous 1927 talking picture, The Jazz Singer. ... Lady and the Tramp is a 1955 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Productions, and originally released to theaters on June 16, 1955 by Buena Vista Distribution/RKO Radio Pictures. ... Pete Kellys Blues is a 1955 film directed by Jack Webb, who also acts in it, along with Janet Leigh and Peggy Lee, who plays an alcoholic jazz singer. ...

Music sample

Image:Peggy Lee - Big Spender.ogg Image File history File links Peggy_Lee_-_Big_Spender. ...


External links

Persondata
NAME Lee, Peggy
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Egstrom, Norma Deloris
SHORT DESCRIPTION Singer, Actress
DATE OF BIRTH May 26, 1920
PLACE OF BIRTH Jamestown, North Dakota
DATE OF DEATH January 21, 2002
PLACE OF DEATH Bel-Air, Los Angeles, California

  Results from FactBites:
 
WIC Biography - Peggy Lee (335 words)
Peggy Lee's contributions to American music - not only as a singer but also as a lyricist, composer and musical innovator - exemplify popular music at its best through the eras of jazz, blues, swing, Latin and rock.
Besides her many musical talents, Peggy Lee is a poet, screenwriter, author, fabric and greeting card designer, painter and humanitarian.
Peggy Lee presented a benefit concert for Women's International Center, raising sufficient funds for WIC to establish the Peggy Lee Music Scholarship to help musicians in time of need and for education.
Peggy Lee | Obituaries | Guardian Unlimited (1746 words)
Lee's ironic side is what has distanced her from all the torch singers who pop buttons with the effort of proving how deeply they empathise with the emotions of a song, and how urgently they desire to share it.
Peggy Lee could suggest the girl down the street, but - as has often been remarked of her - the one who moved up from the country, learned a thing or two hard and fast, but just got wiser on the knowledge rather than resigned to staring into the bottom of a glass.
Peggy Lee was born Norma Delores Egstrom in the North Dakota farm town of Jamestown, the daughter of Marvin and Selma Egstrom, the former a Scandinavian immigrant railroad worker.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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