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Encyclopedia > Pegasus
Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure
Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure
Pegasus and Bellerophon, from Mabie, Hamilton Wright (Ed.):Myths Every Child Should Know (1914)
Pegasus and Bellerophon, from Mabie, Hamilton Wright (Ed.):Myths Every Child Should Know (1914)

In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek: Πήγασος, Pégasos, 'strong') was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. There are two versions of the winged stallion's birth and his brother the giant, Chrysaor: Pegasus can mean many things: // Traditional Pegasus is the winged horse of Greek mythology. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1169, 241 KB) Summary Bellérophon tuant la chimère. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x1169, 241 KB) Summary Bellérophon tuant la chimère. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (952 × 1324 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- Other versions no. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 431 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (952 × 1324 pixel, file size: 256 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- Other versions no. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... This article is about the Greek mythological monster. ... For other uses, see Medusa (disambiguation). ... Greek mythology In Greek mythology, Chrysaor (Greek Χρυσάωρ, golden falchion, from χρυσός, gold, and ἄορ, sword, falchion) was a giant, the son of Poseidon and Medusa. ...

  • One is that they sprang from Medusa's neck as Perseus beheaded her, a "higher" birth, like the birth of Athena from the head of Zeus.
  • Another says that they were born of the Earth as Medusa's blood spilled onto it, in which case Poseidon would not be their sire. A variation on this story holds that they were formed from the mingling of Medusa's blood and the sea foam, thus including Poseidon in their making.

Athena caught and tamed Pegasus, and presented him to the Muses at Mount Parnassus. After he became the horse of the Muses, he was at the service of the poets. Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Mount Parnassus is a mountain of barren limestone in central Greece that towers above Delphi, north of the Gulf of Corinth, and offers scenic views of the surrounding olive groves and countryside. ...


Hesiod connects the name Pegasos with the word for "spring, well", pēgē; everywhere the winged horse struck his hoof to the earth, an inspiring spring burst forth: one on the Muses' Mount Helicon, the Hippocrene ("horse spring"), at the behest of Poseidon to prevent the mountain swelling too much and another at Troezen. The actual etymology of the name is most likely from Luwian pihassas "lightning", or pihassasas, a weather god (the god of lightning). In Hesiod, Pegasos is still associated with this original significance by carrying the thunderbolts for Zeus. Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... This article is about the mountain. ... In Greek mythology, Hippocrene was the name of a fountain on Mt. ... Troezen (TREE-zun) is a city in Argolis located southwest of Athens and a few miles south of Methana. ... Luwian (sometimes spelled Luvian) is part of the Anatolian branch of the Indo European language family and has been preserved in three forms: (1) Cuneiform Luwian, (2) Hieroglyphic-Luwian and (3), the somewhat later Lycian. ...

Parthian era Bronze plate with Pegasus depiction ("Pegaz" in Persian). Excavated in Masjed Soleiman, Khuzestan, Iran.
Parthian era Bronze plate with Pegasus depiction ("Pegaz" in Persian). Excavated in Masjed Soleiman, Khuzestan, Iran.

Pegasus aided the hero Bellerophon (or in later versions Perseus) in his fight against both the Chimera and the Amazons. There are varying tales as to how Bellerophon found Pegasus; the most common says that the hero was told by Polyeidos to sleep in the temple of Athena, where the goddess visited him in the night and presented him with a golden bridle. The next morning, still clutching the bridle, he found Pegasus drinking at the Pierian spring. When the steed saw the bridle, he approached Bellerophon and allowed him to ride. Bellerophon slew the Chimaera on Pegasus' back, and then tried to ride the winged horse to the top of Mount Olympus to see the gods. However, Zeus sent down a gadfly to sting Pegasus, causing Bellerophon to fall all the way back to Earth[1] on the Plain of Aleion ("Wandering"), where he lived out his life in misery as a blinded cripple as punishment for trying to act as a god. Image File history File linksMetadata Pegasus_iran. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Pegasus_iran. ... Parthia at its greatest extent under Mithridates II (123–88 BCE) Capital Ctesiphon, Ecbatana Government Monarchy History  - Established 247 BCE  - Disestablished 220 CE Parthia[1] was an Iranian civilization situated in the northeast of modern Iran, but at its height covering all of Iran proper, as well as regions of... Masjed Soleyman (also Masjid Soleiman and Masjid-al-Salaman) (مسجد سلیمان in Persian) is a town in the southwestern province of Khuzestan, Iran. ... Map showing Khuzestan in Iran Domes like this are quite common in Khuzestan province. ... For other uses, see Bellerophon (disambiguation). ... Perseus with the head of Medusa, by Antonio Canova, completed 1801 (Vatican Museums) Perseus, Perseos, or Perseas (Greek: Περσεύς, Περσέως, Περσέας), the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Perseid dynasty there, and was the hero who killed Medusa. ... For other uses, see Chimera. ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... In Greek mythology, Polyeidos (or Polyidus) was the wisest man in Lycia. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: perhaps from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think[1]) are a number of goddesses or spirits who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music and dance. ... Mount Olympus (Greek: ; also transliterated as Mount Ólympos, and on modern maps, Óros Ólimbos) is the highest mountain in Greece at 2,919 meters high (9,576 feet)[1]. Since its base is located at sea level, it is one of the highest mountains in Europe, in real absolute altitude... The gadfly appears in Greek mythology as a tormenter to Io, the heifer maiden. ...


Afterward, Pegasus found sanctuary on the sacred mountain, where he carried Zeus' thunderbolts and was ridden by Eos, the goddess of dawn. Eos, by Evelyn De Morgan (1850 - 1919), 1895 (Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, SC): for a Pre-Raphaelite painter, Eos was still the classical pagan equivalent of an angel Eos (dawn) was, in Greek Mythology, the Titan goddess of the dawn, who rose from her home at the edge of...


In his later life, Pegasus took a mate, Euippe (or Ocyrrhoe), and had two children Celeris and Melanippe. This family is the origin of the winged horses. Celeris is associated with the constellation Equuleus. Categories: Possible copyright violations ... In Greek mythology, Melanippe referred to several different people. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ...

The Pegasus constellation

Pegasus was not immortal. Because of his faithful service Zeus honoured him with a constellation.[2] On the last day of his life, when Zeus transformed him into a constellation, a single feather fell to the earth near the city of Tarsus.[citation needed] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... This article is about the star grouping. ... 68. ...


In modern terminology, the word "pegasus" (plural "pegasi") has come to refer to any winged horse, though the term "pterippus" (meaning winged horse, plural "pterippi") is also used. Pegasus is also the symbol of the Mobil brand of gas and oil, marketed by the Exxon Mobil Corporation. Mobil gas station in the Loisaida section of the East Village of New York City Mobil was a major American oil company which merged with Exxon in 1999 to form ExxonMobil. ... Exxon Mobil Corporation or ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM), headquartered in Irving, Texas, is an oil producer and distributor formed on November 30, 1999, by the merger of Exxon and Mobil. ...


See also

In Greek mythology, Arion or Areion (Ancient Greek Άρείων) is a divinely-bred, extremely swift immortal horse that, according to the Latin poet Sextus Propertius, was also endowed with speech. ... Buraq from a 17th-century Mughal miniature The Buraq (Arabic: البُراق al-buraaq, meaning lightning, also means the element boron; Turkish: Burak), is according to Islamic tradition a creature from the heavens that carried Muhammad from earth to heaven and back during the Isra and Miraj (Night Journey). ... Chollima is the mythical Korean horse too swift to be mounted. ... The Tängvide image stone is thought to show Odin entering Valhalla riding on Sleipnir Sleipnir is also a Japanese web browser. ... Screenshot of Series Intro Luno The White Stallion was a Terry Toons television series that aired in the mid-1960s. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pegasus
  1. ^ Parallels are in the myths of Icarus and Phaeton.
  2. ^ Scott Littleton:"Mythology. The Illustrated Anthology of World Myth & Storytelling", p 147. Duncan Baird Publishers, London, 2002. ISBN 1-903296-37-4

  Results from FactBites:
 
Pegasus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (455 words)
Pegasus aided the hero Bellerophon, who is a double in some way for Perseus, in his fight against both the Chimera and the Amazons.
Pegasus was eventually turned into a constellation, but a single feather fell to the earth near the city of Tarsus (hence its name).
Similarly, in the Disney adaptation of the Hercules legend, Pegasus is depicted as a childhood pet of Hercules.
Pegasus Constellation - Crystalinks (1338 words)
In Greek Mythology, Pegasus was a winged horse that was the child of Poseidon [Zeus] and the Gorgon Medusa.
Thus Pegasus is the white sea horse of Revelation and the white sea horse in the sky, and in addition, the white sea horse of memory within you.
Pegasus is the white horse that caused the fountain of the Muses to activate.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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