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Encyclopedia > Pedestrian
Look up Pedestrian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
A pedestrian at the intersection of Alinga Street and Northbourne Avenue, Canberra, Australia
A pedestrian at the intersection of Alinga Street and Northbourne Avenue, Canberra, Australia

A pedestrian is a person travelling on foot, whether walking or running. In modern times, the term mostly refers to someone walking on a road but this was not the case historically. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary is a Wikimedia Foundation project intended to be a free wiki dictionary (hence: Wiktionary) (including thesaurus and lexicon) in every language. ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ...  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... The term intersection can mean: a road junction, where two roads intersect each other, such as a roundabout intersection; in mathematics, the set in which two or more other sets intersect each other; see intersection (set theory); a movie; see Intersection (movie). ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Woman walking downstairs Walk redirects here. ... Man Running - Edward Muybridge Horse Running - Edward Muybridge Running is by definition the fastest means for an animal to move on foot. ... A typical rural county road in Indiana, USA, where traffic drives on the right. ...

Contents


History

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, pedestrianism was a popular spectator sport just as equestrianism still is. One of the most famous pedestrians of the day was Captain Robert Barclay Allardice, known as "The Celebrated Pedestrian", of Stonehaven. His most impressive feat was to walk 1 mile every hour for 1000 hours, which he achieved between the 1st of June and the 12th of July, 1809. This feat captured the imagination of the public, and around 10,000 people came to watch over the course of the event. During the rest of the nineteenth century attempts to repeat this particular athletic challenge were made by many pedestrians including the renowned Ada Anderson who developed it further and walked a quarter-mile in each quarter-hour over the 1,000 hours. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A junior horse riding event at the Melbourne Show Equestrianism relates to the riding of horses. ... Captain is both a nautical term and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... Robert Barclay Allardice (August 25, 1779 - May 8, 1854), the 6th Laird of Ury, generally known as Captain Barclay, was a famous walker of the early 19th century, known as The Celebrated Pedestrian. ... Dunnottar Castle Location within the British Isles Stonehaven (Steenhive in the Doric dialect of Scots ) is a town on the North-East coast of Scotland. ... A mile is any of a number of units of distance, each in the magnitude of 1–10 km. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... July 12 is the 193rd day (194th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 172 days remaining. ... 1809 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Since the nineteenth century, interest in pedestrianism has dropped. Although it is still an Olympic sport, it fails to catch public attention in the way that it used to. However, pedestrians are still carrying out major walking feats such as the popular Land's End to John o' Groats walk, in the United Kingdom, or traversal of North America from coast to coast. These feats are often tied to charitable fundraising and have been achieved by celebrities such as Sir Jimmy Savile or Ian Botham as well as by people not otherwise in the public eye. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... Lands End (Cornish name: Pedn a Wollaz) is a headland on the Penwith peninsula, located near Penzance, Cornwall, at the extreme south-western tip of the British mainland. ... John o Groats location within the British Isles John o Groats (Taigh Iain Ghròt in Scottish Gaelic) (grid reference ND380734) is a village in the traditional county of Caithness, in the Highland region of Scotland, and is usually regarded as the most northerly settlement on the mainland of... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck Charity, meaning selfless giving, is one conventional English translation of the Greek term agapē. // Etymology In the 1400, charity meant the state of love or simple affection which one was in or out of regarding one... Sir Jimmy Savile OBE Sir James Wilson Vincent Savile OBE (born 31 October 1926), commonly called Jimmy Savile, is a British DJ, actor and television personality. ... Ian Terence Botham OBE, (born November 24, 1955 in Heswall, Cheshire) (nicknamed Beefy) was one of Englands best-ever cricketers and one of the best all-round cricketers of all time. ...


Health and Environment

Regular walking is very important for both a person's health and the natural environment. Obesity and related medical problems can be effectively prevented and/or cured by moving on foot on a daily basis. The widespread habit of taking the car for short grocery trips significantly contributes to both obesity and climate change, owing to vehicle emissions, as internal combustion engines are extremely inefficient and highly polluting during their first minutes of operation (engine cold start). General availability of public transportation encourages walking, as it won't, in most cases, take one directly to one's destination. Devils Punchbowl Waterfall, New Zealand. ... Supermarket produce section A supermarket is a store that sells a wide variety of goods including food and alcohol, medicine, clothes, and other household products that are consumed regularly. ... A colorized automobile engine The internal combustion engine is a heat engine in which the burning of a fuel occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ... A taxi serving as a bus Public transport comprises all transport systems in which the passengers do not travel in their own vehicles. ...


Roads

Nowadays, roads often have a designated footpath attached especially for pedestrian traffic, called the sidewalk in American English and the pavement in British English. There are also footpaths not associated with a road which are used purely by pedestrians, particularly ramblers, hikers or hill-walkers and there are roads not associated with a footpath. Such footpaths in mountainous or forested areas are called trails. On some of the latter, pedestrians share the road with horses and vehicles whilst on others they are forbidden from using the road altogether. Also some shopping streets are for pedestrians only. Some roads have special pedestrian crossings. A bridge solely for pedestrians is a footbridge. Interstate 80, a freeway in California with many lanes and heavy traffic. ... A sidewalk (North American English), or pavement or footpath (Commonwealth English), is a path, usually constructed of concrete (particularly in the United States, and Canada), asphalt, brick (particularly in Europe) or stone, designed for pedestrian traffic and often running alongside a road. ... American English (AmE) is the dialect of the English language used mostly in the United States of America. ... Dialect areas of England British English (BrE) is a term used to differentiate between the form of the English language used in the British Isles and those used elsewhere. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up shop in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A shop is an enclosed location where a specific activity is carried out. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... ...


Pedestrianisation

Colorful pedestrian Light Tunnel at Detroit's DTW airport.
Colorful pedestrian Light Tunnel at Detroit's DTW airport.

Efforts are underway by pedestrian advocacy groups to restore pedestrian access to new developments, especially to counteract newer developments where 20 to 30 percent do not include sidewalks. Some activists advocate large auto-free zones where pedestrians only or pedestrians and some non motorised vehicles are allowed. Many urbanists have extolled the virtues of pedestrian streets in urban areas. Many urban streets in the USA lack street lighting (lamp poles), based on the reasoning that cars have headlights to illuminate their own way. An exception is New York City, the only locality in the United States where more than half of all households do not own a car (the figure is even higher in Manhattan, over 75%; nationally, the rate is 8%[1]). This policy severely restricts or effectively prohibits pedestrian traffic and contributes to excessive car use on short distance trips. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 872 KB) Summary Photo of the pedestrian, Light Tunnel at Detroits DTW airport. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 872 KB) Summary Photo of the pedestrian, Light Tunnel at Detroits DTW airport. ... Advocacy is an umbrella term for organized activism related to a particular set of issues. ... Venice (J.H. Crawford) Auto-free zones are also known as car-free zones and pedestrianised zones. ... Urban, city, or town planning, deals with design of the built environment from the municipal and metropolitan perspective. ... A streetlight in front of a red sky at night A street light, also known as a light standard, is a raised light on the edge of a road, turned on or lit at a certain time every night. ... A cycle rickshaw at rest in Manhattan. ...


In contrast pedestrian traffic is officially encouraged in some parts of the European Union and construction or separation of dedicated walking routes receives a high priority in most large European city centres, often in conjunction with public transport enhancements. In Copenhagen the world's longest pedestrian shopping area, the Strøget, has been developed over the last 40 years principally due to the work of Danish architect Jan Gehl. Skytrain Bangkok. ... Copenhagen (IPA: , rhyming with pagan, or , with a as in spa; Danish IPA: ) is the capital of Denmark and the countrys largest city (metropolitan population 1,115,035 (2006), at present made up of 16 municipalities. ... Strøget - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Jan Gehl (born 1936) is a Danish architect and urban design consultant based in Copenhagen and whose career has focused on improving the quality of pedestrian urban life. ...


The promotion of walking has been linked to the rebuilding of social capital. Social capital is defined as the value that is created through the application of social networks during non-organizational time. ...


Other uses

The word pedestrian also has a figurative meaning of "unimaginative" or "ordinary." E.g. ‘’She wrote pages and pages of pedestrian prose’’.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Pedestrian - Uncyclopedia (325 words)
A pedestrian is a subspecies (Homo sapiens doofus) of regular ordinary humanity (Homo sapiens automobilus) that have, through thousands of generations of selective inbreeding, lost their ability to drive.
Pedestrians often congregate inside cities in staggering numbers, and are known for their inherent inability to utilize crosswalks and signal-for-walkies buttons.
However, in spite of their extremely erratic, irrational, and/or self-endangering behavior, pedestrians are remarkably difficult to actually hit with a moving vehicle, due to their unpredictable motions and uncanny skill of blending in with their immediate surroundings, in spite of wearing the most ridiculously bizarre and ill-fitting multi-colored clothing imaginable.
Pedestrian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (820 words)
However, pedestrians are still carrying out major walking feats such as the popular Land's End to John o' Groats walk, in the United Kingdom, or traversal of North America from coast to coast.
In contrast pedestrian traffic is officially encouraged in some parts of the European Union and construction or separation of dedicated walking routes receives a high priority in most large European city centres, often in conjunction with public transport enhancements.
The word pedestrian is also used as an adjective having a figurative meaning of "unimaginative" or "ordinary." This is by implied contrast of a walker with an equestrian (horse rider).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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