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Encyclopedia > Pectineal line (femur)
Pectineal line (femur)
Right femur. Posterior surface.
Latin l. pectinea
Gray's subject #59 246
Dorlands/Elsevier l_10/12496345

On the posterior surface of the femur, the intermediate ridge or pectineal line is continued to the base of the lesser trochanter and gives attachment to the pectineus muscle. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (476x1270, 68 KB) Source Originally from en. ... The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of the human body. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Elseviers logo. ... The femur or thigh bone is the longest, most voluminous, and strongest bone of the human body. ... The Lesser Trochanter (small trochanter) of the femur is a conical eminence, which varies in size in different subjects; it projects from the lower and back part of the base of the neck. ... The pectineus muscle is a muscle in the inner thigh, by the femur. ...


This article was originally based on an entry from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy. As such, some of the information contained herein may be outdated. Please edit the article if this is the case, and feel free to remove this notice when it is no longer relevant. The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body, commonly known as Grays Anatomy, is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ...


 
 

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