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Encyclopedia > Pearl
A black pearl and a shell of the black-lipped pearl oyster
A black pearl and a shell of the black-lipped pearl oyster
Saltwater pearl oyster farm, Seram, Indonesia
Saltwater pearl oyster farm, Seram, Indonesia

A pearl is a hard, roundish object produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk. Just like the shell of mollusks, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate in minute crystalline form, which has been deposited in concentric layers. The ideal pearl is perfectly round and smooth, but many other shapes of pearls (baroque pearls) occur. Look up pearl in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2500 × 1874 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2500 × 1874 pixel, file size: 1. ... Download high resolution version (1000x750, 138 KB)Pearl Farm on Seram, Indonesia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1000x750, 138 KB)Pearl Farm on Seram, Indonesia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The mantle is an organ found in mollusks. ... Various seashells Danielle A shell is the hard, rigid outer covering, or integument, allanimals. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora Monoplacophora Bivalvia Scaphopoda Gastropoda Cephalopoda † Rostroconchia The mollusks or molluscs are the large and diverse phylum Mollusca, which includes a variety of familiar creatures well-known for their decorative shells or as seafood. ... Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ... Baroque Tahitian pearls mounted with diamonds and platinum as earrings Baroque pearls are simply pearls that have an irregular shape. ...


The finest quality pearls have been highly valued as gemstones and objects of beauty for many centuries, and the word pearl has become a metaphor for something rare, fine, and admirable. For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... For beauty as a characteristic of a persons appearance, see Physical attractiveness. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ...


Almost any shelled mollusk can, by natural processes, produce some kind of "pearl" when an irritating microscopic object becomes trapped within the mollusk's mantle folds, but virtually none of these "pearls" are considered to be gemstones.


True iridescent pearls, the most desirable pearls, are produced by two groups of molluscan bivalves or clams. One family lives in the sea: the pearl oysters. The other, very different group of bivalves live in freshwater, and these are the river mussels; for example, see the freshwater pearl mussel. Orders Subclass Protobranchia Solemyoida Nuculoida Subclass Pteriomorphia - oysters Arcoida Mytiloida Pterioida Subclass Paleoheterodonta - mussels Trigoinoida Unionoida Subclass Heterodonta - clams, zebra mussels Veneroida Myoida Subclass Anomalosdesmata Pholadomyoida Animals of the Class Bivalvia are known as bivalves because they typically have two-part shells, with both parts being more or less symmetrical. ... For other uses, see Clam (disambiguation). ... Species Pinctada maxima Pinctada margaritifera Pinctada fucata Pinctada radiata Pinctada albina Pinctada virens Pinctada chemnitzi Pinctada maculata Pinctada nigra Pinctada atropurpurea Pinctada laosensis Pinctada martensi The Pearl Oysters are the genus Pinctada of bivalve molluscs. ... Subclasses Pteriomorpha (marine mussels) Palaeoheterodonta (freshwater mussels) Heterodonta (zebra mussels) The common name mussel is used for members of several different families of clams or bivalve molluscs, from both saltwater and freshwater habitats. ... Binomial name Margaritifera margaritifera Linneaus, 1758 The freshwater pearl mussel, Margaritifera margaritifera, is an endangered species of freshwater mussel. ...


Saltwater pearls can grow in several species of marine pearl oysters in the family Pteriidae. Freshwater pearls grow within certain (but by no means all) species of freshwater mussels in the order Unionida, the families Unionidae and Margaritiferidae. All of these bivalves are able to make true pearls because they have a thick inner shell layer composed of "mother of pearl" or nacre. The mantle of the living bivalve can create a pearl in the same way that it creates the pearly inner layer of the shell. Marine is an umbrella term for things relating to the ocean, as with marine biology, marine geology, and as a term for a navy, etc. ... For other uses, see Family (disambiguation). ... Genera Pinctada Pteria Pteriidae is a family of bivalves. ... Genera See text for genera and species. ... Genera See text for genera and species. ... A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ... “Mother of Pearl” redirects here. ...


Fine gem-quality saltwater and freshwater pearls can and do sometimes occur completely naturally, but this is rare. Many hundreds of pearl oysters or pearl mussels have to be gathered and opened, and thus killed, in order to find even one pearl, and for many centuries that was the only way pearls were obtained. This was the main reason why pearls fetched such extraordinary prices in the past. In modern times however, almost all the pearls for sale were formed with a good deal of expert intervention from human pearl farmers.


A true pearl is made from layers of nacre, by the same living process as is used in the secretion of the mother of pearl which lines the shell. A "natural pearl" is one that formed without any human intervention at all, in the wild, and is very rare. A "cultured pearl", on the other hand, is one that has been formed on a pearl farm. The great majority of pearls on the market are cultured pearls.


Imitation or fake pearls are also widely sold in inexpensive jewelry, but the quality of the iridescence is usually very poor, and generally speaking, fake pearls are usually quite easy to distinguish from the real thing.


Pearls have been harvested, or more recently cultivated, primarily for use in jewelry, but in the past they were also stitched onto lavish clothing, as worn, for example, by royalty. Pearls have also been crushed and used in cosmetics, medicines, or in paint formulations. Jewelry (the American spelling; spelled jewellery in Commonwealth English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ...


Pearl is considered to be the birthstone for June. For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Physical properties

Akoya pearl grafting shed in Xuwen, China.
Akoya pearl grafting shed in Xuwen, China.

The unique luster of pearls depends upon the reflection, refraction, and diffraction of light from the translucent layers. The thinner and more numerous the layers in the pearl, the finer the luster. The iridescence that pearls display is caused by the overlapping of successive layers, which breaks up light falling on the surface. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Lustre (American English: luster) is a description of the way light interacts with the surface of a crystal, rock or mineral. ... The reflection of a bridge in Indianapolis, Indianas Central Canal. ... For the property of metals, see refraction (metallurgy). ... The intensity pattern formed on a screen by diffraction from a square aperture Diffraction refers to various phenomena associated with wave propagation, such as the bending, spreading and interference of waves passing by an object or aperture that disrupts the wave. ... The iridescence of the Blue Morpho butterfly wings. ...


Pearls are often white or cream, but the color can vary quite a lot according to the natural color of the nacre in the various species of mollusk used. Thus pearls can also be black, or various pastel shades. In addition, pearls (especially freshwater pearls) can be dyed yellow, green, blue, brown, pink, purple, or black.


Freshwater and saltwater pearls

Freshwater and saltwater pearls may sometimes look quite similar, but they come from very different sources.


Freshwater pearls form in various species of freshwater mussels, family Unionidae, which live in lakes, rivers, ponds and other bodies of fresh water. These freshwater pearl mussels occur not only in hotter climates, but also in colder more temperate areas such as Scotland: see the freshwater pearl mussel. However, most freshwater cultured pearls sold today come from China. Freshwater pearls are a kind of pearl that comes from freshwater mussels. ... Genera See text for genera and species. ... This article is about the country. ... Binomial name Margaritifera margaritifera Linneaus, 1758 The freshwater pearl mussel, Margaritifera margaritifera, is an endangered species of freshwater mussel. ... A cultured pearl is a pearl created by a pearl farmer under controlled conditions. ...


Saltwater pearls grow within pearl oysters, family Pteriidae, which live in tropical oceans. Saltwater pearl oysters are usually cultivated in protected lagoons. The three main types of saltwater pearls are Akoya, South Sea and Tahitian. Genera Pinctada Pteria Pteriidae is a family of bivalves. ... This mid bay barrier in Narrabeen, a suburb of Sydney (Australia), has blocked what used to be a bay to form a lagoon. ...


Creation of a pearl

The difference between natural and cultured pearls focuses on whether the pearl was created spontaneously by nature — without human intervention — or with human aid. Pearls are formed inside the shell of certain bivalve mollusks: as a response to an irritant inside its shell, the mollusk creates a pearl to seal off the irritation. Orders Subclass Protobranchia Solemyoida Nuculoida Subclass Pteriomorphia - oysters Arcoida Mytiloida Pterioida Subclass Paleoheterodonta - mussels Trigoinoida Unionoida Subclass Heterodonta - clams, zebra mussels Veneroida Myoida Subclass Anomalosdesmata Pholadomyoida Animals of the Class Bivalvia are known as bivalves because they typically have two-part shells, with both parts being more or less symmetrical. ...


The mantle of the mollusk deposits layers of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of the minerals aragonite or calcite (both crystalline forms of calcium carbonate) held together by an organic horn-like compound called conchiolin. This combination of calcium carbonate and conchiolin is called nacre, or as most know it, mother-of-pearl. The commonly held belief that a grain of sand acts as the irritant is in fact rarely the case. Typical stimuli include organic material, parasites, or even damage that displaces mantle tissue to another part of the animal's body. These small particles or organisms enter the animal when the shell valves are open for feeding or respiration. In cultured pearls, the irritant is typically a cut piece of the mantle epithelium, together with processed shell beads, the combination of which the animal accepts into its body. [1][2][3] Calcium carbonate is a chemical compound, with the chemical formula CaCO3. ... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Aragonite Aragonite is a polymorph of the mineral calcite, both having the chemical composition CaCO3. ... Doubly refracting Calcite from Iceberg claim, Dixon, New Mexico. ... Conchiolin (sometimes referred to as conchin) and perlucin are complex proteins which are secreted by a molluscs outer epithelium (the mantle). ... “Mother of Pearl” redirects here. ... A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ...


Natural pearls

Cross section illustration showing natural and cultured pearls.
Cross section illustration showing natural and cultured pearls.

Natural pearls are nearly 100% nacre. It is thought that natural pearls form under a set of accidental conditions when a microscopic intruder or parasite enters a bivalve mollusk, and settles inside the shell. The mollusk, being irritated by the intruder, secretes the calcium carbonate substance called nacre to cover the irritant. This secretion process is repeated many times, thus producing a pearl. Natural pearls come in many shapes, with round ones being comparatively rare. Image File history File links PEARL-SECTION.jpg‎ from agt-gems. ... Image File history File links PEARL-SECTION.jpg‎ from agt-gems. ... “Mother of Pearl” redirects here. ... “Mother of Pearl” redirects here. ...


Cultured pearls

Cultured pearls (nucleated and non-nucleated or tissue nucleated cultured pearls) and imitation pearls can be distinguished from natural pearls by X-ray examination. Nucleated cultured pearls are often 'pre-formed' as they tend to follow the shape of the implanted shell bead nucleus. Once the pre-formed beads are inserted into the oyster, it secretes a few layers of nacre around the outside surface of the implant before it is removed after six months or more. When a nucleated cultured pearl is X-rayed it will reveal a different structure to that of a natural pearl. It exhibits a solid center with no concentric growth rings, compared to a solid center with growth rings.


Gemological identification

A well equipped gem testing laboratory is able to distinguish natural pearls from cultured pearls by using a gemological x-ray in order to examine the center of a pearl. With an x-ray it is possible to see the growth rings of the pearl, where the layers of calcium carbonate are separated by thin layers of conchiolin. The differentiation of a natural pearls from or tissue-nucleated cultured pearls can be very difficult without the use of this x-ray technique. In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz...


Natural and cultured pearls can be distinguished from imitation pearls using a microscope. Another method of testing for imitations is to rub the pearl against the surface of a front tooth. Imitation pearls are completely smooth, but natural and cultured pearls are composed of nacre platelets, which feel slightly gritty. A microscope (Greek: (micron) = small + (skopein) = to look at) is an instrument for viewing objects that are too small to be seen by the naked or unaided eye. ...


Value of a natural pearl

Quality natural pearls are very rare jewels. The actual value of a natural pearl is determined in the same way as it would be for other "precious" gems. The valuation factors include size, shape, quality of surface, orientation, and luster.


Single natural pearls are often sold as a collector's item, or set as centerpieces in unique jewelry. Very few matched strands of natural pearls exist, and those that do often sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Yachtsman and financier Cartier purchased the landmark Cartier store on Fifth Avenue in New York for $100 cash and a double strand of matched natural pearls valued at $1 million.


Keshi pearls, although they often occur by chance, are not considered natural pearls. They are a byproduct of the culturing process, and hence do not happen without human intervention. These pearls are quite small: typically a few millimeters in size. Keshi pearls are produced by many different types of marine mollusks and freshwater mussels in China.[4] Today many "keshi" pearls are actually intentional, with post-harvest shells returned to the water to regenerate a pearl in the existing pearl sac.


Origin of a natural pearl

Previously natural pearls were found in many parts of the world. Present day natural pearling is confined mostly to seas off Bahrain. Australia also has one of the world's last remaining fleets of pearl diving ships. Australian pearl divers dive for south sea pearl oysters to be used in the cultured south sea pearl industry. The catch of pearl oysters is similar to the numbers of oysters taken during the natural pearl days. Hence significant numbers of natural pearls are still found in the Australian Indian Ocean waters from wild oysters. X-Ray examination is required to positively verify natural pearls found today.


Different types of cultured pearls

Nuclei from Toba Pearl Island, Japan
Nuclei from Toba Pearl Island, Japan

Black pearls, frequently referred to as Black Tahitian Pearls, are highly valued because of their rarity; the culturing process for them dictates a smaller volume output and can never be mass produced. This is due to bad health and/or non-survival of the process, rejection of the nucleus (the small object such as a tiny fish, grain of sand or crab that slips naturally inside an oyster's shell or inserted by a human), and their sensitivity to changing climatic and ocean conditions. Before the days of cultured pearls, black pearls were rare and highly valued for the simple reason that white pearl oysters rarely produced natural black pearls, and black pearl oysters rarely produced any natural pearls at all. Since pearl culture technology, the black pearl oyster found in Tahiti and many other Pacific Island area has been extensively used for producing cultured pearls. The rarity of the black cultured pearl is now a "comparative" issue. The black cultured pearl is rare when compared to Chinese freshwater cultured pearls, and Japanese and Chinese Akoya cultured pearls, and is more valuable than these pearls. However, it is more abundant than the south sea pearl, which is more valuable than the black cultured pearl. This is simply due to the fact that the black pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera is far more abundant than the elusive, rare, and larger south sea pearl oyster - Pinctada maxima, which cannot be found in lagoons, but which must be dived for in a rare number of deep ocean habitats. Black cultured pearls from the black pearl oyster — Pinctada margaritifera — are NOT south sea pearls, although they are often mistakenly described as black south sea pearls. In the absence of an official definition for the pearl from the black oyster, these pearls are usually referred to as "black Tahitian pearls". The correct definition of a south sea pearl — as described by CIBJO and the GIA — is a pearl produced by the Pinctada maxima pearl oyster. South sea pearls are the color of their host Pinctada maxima oyster — and can be white, silver, pink, gold, cream, and any combination of these basic colors, including overtones of the various colors of the rainbow displayed in the pearl nacre of the oyster shell itself. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (815x657, 133 KB)Location: Toba Pearl Island, Japan Photo Date: 2000 Photographer: Dr. John Supan, Louisiana State University Source: [1], cropped File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (815x657, 133 KB)Location: Toba Pearl Island, Japan Photo Date: 2000 Photographer: Dr. John Supan, Louisiana State University Source: [1], cropped File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Toba may refer to: T. O. B. A., the Theater Owners Booking Association, a major black vaudeville circuit. ...


Other "pearls"

Biologically speaking, under the right set of circumstances, almost any shelled mollusk can produce some kind of "pearl," however, most of these molluscan "pearls" have no luster or iridescence. In fact the great majority of mollusk species produce pearls which are not attractive to look at, and are sometimes not even very durable, such that they usually have no value at all, except perhaps to a scientist, or as a curiosity. These objects would be referred to as "calcareous concretions" by a gemologist, even though a malacologist would still consider them to be pearls. The iridescence of the Blue Morpho butterfly wings. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora - Chitons Monoplacophora Bivalvia - Bivalves Scaphopoda - Tusk shells Gastropoda - Snails and Slugs Cephalopoda - Squids, Octopuses, etc. ...


One unusual example of calcareous concretions which nonetheless can sometimes have value, are the "pearls" which are found very rarely growing between the mantle and the shell of the queen conch or pink conch, Strombus gigas, a large sea snail or marine gastropod from the Caribbean Sea. These "pearls", which are pink in color, are a by-product of the conch fishing industry, and the best of them show some chatoyance. Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis Strombus tricornis Strombus canarium Strombus dolomena Strombus gibberulus Strombus conomurex Strombus lentigo Strombus doxander Strombus urceus Strombus fragilis Strombus gallus Strombus dentatus Strombus marginatus Strombus raninus Strombus buvonius A conch (pronounced in the U.S.A. as konk or conch, IPA: or ) [1... Binomial name Strombus gigas Carolus Linnaeus, 1758 The Queen Conch (Strombus gigas) is a true conch and the largest mollusk native to North America. ... Subclass Subclass Eogastropoda     Patellogastropoda Subclass Orthogastropoda   Superorder Cocculiniformia   Superorder Hot Vent Taxa     Neomphaolida   Superorder Vetigastropoda   Superorder Neritaemorphi     Neritopsina   Superorder Caenogastropoda     Architaenioglossa     Sorbeoconcha   Superorder Heterobranchia     Heterostropha     Opisthobranchia     Pulmonata The gastropods, or univalves, are the largest and most successful class of mollusks, with 60,000-75,000 species, and second largest class... Map of Central America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Sea (pronounced or ) is a tropical sea in the Western Hemisphere, part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. ...


Somewhat similar gastropod "pearls", this time more orange in hue, are (again very rarely) found in the horse conch Pleuroploca gigantea. Pleuroploca gigantea is commonly called the Horse Conch and the Giant Band Shell. ...


The largest example of another "pearl"

The largest "pearl" known, was found in the Philippines in 1934. It is a naturally-occurring, non-nacreous, calcareous concretion from a giant clam. Because it did not grow in a pearl oyster it is not pearly, instead it has a porcellaneous surface, in other words it is glossy like a china plate. Gemologically speaking, it is not a pearl. Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The giant clam, Tridacna gigas, or traditionally, pa’ua, is the largest living bivalve mollusc. ...


The object weighs 14 lb (6.4 kg) and was supposedly first discovered by an anonymous Filipino Muslim diver off the island of Palawan in 1934. According to the story as it is currently told, a Palawan chieftain gave the pearl to Wilbur Dowell Cobb in 1936 as a gift for having saved the life of his son. The pearl had been named the "Pearl of Allah" by the Muslim tribal chief, because it resembled a turbaned head. Another legend says that this object is actually the Pearl of Lao-Tzu, a cultured mabe pearl created with a carved amulet and then supposedly progressively grafted into several giant clams, before supposedly being lost due to a shipwreck in 1745. [5] This legend has been discredited, however. This "pearl" is the product of a giant clam, Tridacna gigas, which cannot be grafted. The "pearl" is also a whole pearl, not a mabe, and whole pearl culturing technology is only 100 years old. [6] Filipino Muslims form the largest non-Christian group in the country, comprising 5 % of the total Philippine population as of 2005. ... Palawan is an island province of the Philippines located in the Mimaropa region. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pearl of Lao Tzu (also referred to as Pearl of Lao Tze and Pearl of Allah[1]) is the largest known pearl in the world, measuring 9. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The giant clam (Tridacna gigas) or traditionally, pa’ua, is the largest living bivalve mollusc. ...


The history of pearl hunting and pearl farming

Pearl hunting

For thousands of years, most seawater pearls were retrieved by divers working in the Indian Ocean, in areas like the Persian Gulf, the Red Sea, and in the Gulf of Mannar (by the ancient Tamils).


Starting in the Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD), the Chinese hunted extensively for seawater pearls in the South China Sea. Han Dynasty in 87 BC Capital Changan (206 BC–9 AD) Luoyang (25 AD–220 AD) Language(s) Chinese Religion Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Chinese folk religion Government Monarchy History  - Establishment 206 BC  - Battle of Gaixia; Han rule of China begins 202 BC  - Interruption of Han rule 9 - 24  - Abdication... Filipino name Tagalog: Timog Dagat Tsina (Dagat Luzon for the portion within Philippine waters) Malay name Malay: Laut China Selatan Portuguese name Portuguese: Mar da China Meridional Vietnamese name Vietnamese: The South China Sea is a marginal sea south of China. ...

Catching of pearls, Bern Physiologus (IX century)
Catching of pearls, Bern Physiologus (IX century)

When Spanish conquistadors arrived in the Western Hemisphere, they discovered that around the islands of Cubagua and Margarita, some 200 km north of the Venezuelan coast, was an extensive bed of pearls. One of them, the Peregrina, was offered to the Spanish queens. This pearl later became very famous when Richard Burton purchased it for his wife Elizabeth Taylor. Margarita pearls are extremely difficult to find today and are known for their unique yellowish color. The most famous Margarita necklace that any one can see today is the one that then Venezuelan President Romulo Betancourt gave to Jacqueline Kennedy when she and her husband, President John F. Kennedy paid an official visit to Venezuela.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x1331, 1002 KB) bestiary, the catching of pearls ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1000x1331, 1002 KB) bestiary, the catching of pearls ÄŒesky | Deutsch | English | Ελληνικά | Español | فارسی | Français | עברית | Indonesian | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | Magyar | Nederlands | Polski | Português | RomânÇŽ | Русский | Slovenščina | Српски | Sunda | 简体中文 | 正體中文 | Türkçe | Русский | Українська +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to... Categories: Art stubs | Illuminated manuscripts ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Rómulo Ernesto Betancourt Bello (February 22, 1908 – September 28, 1981), the father of Venezuelan democracy, was President of Venezuela from 1945 to 1948 and again from 1959 to 1964. ... First official White House portrait. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...


Before the beginning of the 20th Century, pearl hunting was the most common way of harvesting pearls. Divers manually pulled oysters from ocean floors and river bottoms and checked them individually for pearls. Not all natural oysters produce pearls. In a haul of three tons, only three or four oysters will produce perfect pearls[citation needed]. Pearl diver in Japan Pearl hunting or pearl diving refers to a now largely obsolete method of retrieving pearls from oysters and, on rare occasions, other nacre-producing creatures, such as abalone. ...


The development of pearl farming

However, almost all pearls used for jewelry are cultured by planting a core or nucleus into pearl oysters. The pearls are usually harvested after one year for Akoya, and 2-4 years for Tahitian and South Sea, and 2-7 years for freshwater. This mariculture process was first developed by Tatsuhei Mise and Tokichi Nishikawa in Japan. Species Pinctada maxima Pinctada margaritifera Pinctada fucata Pinctada radiata Pinctada albina Pinctada virens Pinctada chemnitzi Pinctada maculata Pinctada nigra Pinctada atropurpurea Pinctada laosensis Pinctada martensi The Pearl Oysters are the genus Pinctada of bivalve molluscs. ... Mariculture is the cultivation of marine organisms for food, either in their natural environment or in seawater in ponds or raceways. ...


The nucleus is generally a polished bead made from freshwater mussel shell. Along with a small piece of mantle tissue from another mollusk to serve as a catalyst for the pearl sac, it is surgically implanted into the gonad (reproductive organ) of a saltwater mollusk. In freshwater perliculture, only the piece of tissue is used in most cases, and is inserted into the fleshy mantle of the host mussel. South Sea and Tahitian pearl oysters, also known as Pinctada maxima and Pinctada margaritifera, which survive the subsequent surgery to remove the finished pearl are often implanted with a new, larger nucleus as part of the same procedure and then returned to the water for another 2-3 years of growth. Subclasses Pteriomorpha (marine mussels) Palaeoheterodonta (freshwater mussels) Heterodonta (zebra mussels) The common name mussel is used for members of several different families of clams or bivalve molluscs, from both saltwater and freshwater habitats. ...


Despite the common misperception, Mikimoto did not patent the process of pearl culture. The accepted process of pearl culture was developed by a team of scientists at Tokyo University between 1907 and 1916. The team was headed by Tokichi Nishikawa and Tatsuhei Mise. Nishikawa was granted the patent in 1916, and married the daughter of Mikimoto. Mikimoto was able to use Nishikawa's technology. After the patent was granted in 1916, the technology was immediately commercially applied to akoya pearl oysters in Japan in 1916. Mise's brother was the first to produce a commercial crop of pearls in the akoya oyster. Mitsubishi's Baron Iwasaki immediately applied the technology to the south sea pearl oyster in 1917 in the Philippines, and later in Buton, and Palau. Mitsubishi was the first to produce a cultured south sea pearl - although it was not until 1928 that the first small commercial crop of pearls was successfully produced.


The original Japanese cultured pearls, known as akoya pearls, are produced by a species of small pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii, which is no bigger than 6 to 7 mm in size, hence akoya pearls larger than 10 mm in diameter are extremely rare and highly prized. Today a hybrid mollusk is used in both Japan and China in the production of akoya pearls. It is a cross between the original Japanese species, and the Chinese species Pinctada chemnitzii.[7]


Recent pearl production

China has recently overtaken Japan in akoya pearl production. Japan has all but ceased its production of akoya pearls smaller than 8mm. Japan maintains its status as a pearl processing center, however, and imports the majority of Chinese akoya pearls. These pearls are then processed (often simply matched and sorted), relabeled as product of Japan, and exported.[8]


In the past couple of decades, cultured pearls have been produced using larger oysters in the south Pacific and Indian Ocean. The largest pearl oyster is the Pinctada maxima, which is roughly the size of a dinner plate. South Sea pearls are characterized by their large size and silvery color. Sizes up to 14 mm in diameter are not uncommon. Australia is one of the most important sources of South Sea pearls. Pacific redirects here. ...


Mitsubishi commenced pearl culture with the south sea pearl oyster in 1916, as soon as the technology patent was commercialized. By 1931 this project was showing signs of success, but was upset by the death of Tatsuhei. Although the project was recommenced after Tatsuhei's death, the project was discontinued at the beginning of WWII before significant productions of pearls were achieved.


After WWII, new south sea pearl projects were commenced in the early 1950s in Burma and Kuri Bay and Port Essington in Australia. Japanese companies were involved in all projects using technicians from the original Mitsubishi south sea pre-war projects. Despite often being described as black south sea pearls, Tahitian pearls are not in fact south sea pearls. The correct definition of a south sea pearl is a "pearl produced by the Pinctada maxima pearl oyster."[citation needed]


Japanese freshwater pearl farming

In 1914, pearl farmers began culturing freshwater pearls using the pearl mussels native to Lake Biwa. This lake, the largest and most ancient in Japan, lies near the city of Kyoto. The extensive and successful use of the Biwa Pearl Mussel is reflected in the name Biwa pearls, a phrase which was at one time nearly synonymous with freshwater pearls in general. Since the time of peak production in 1971, when Biwa pearl farmers produced six tons of cultured pearls, pollution and overharvesting have caused the virtual extinction of this animal. Japanese pearl farmers recently cultured a hybrid pearl mussel — a cross between the last remaining Biwa Pearl Mussels and a closely related species from China, Cristaria plicata, in lake Kasumigaura. This industry closed in 2006 due to lake pollution. Lake Biwa ), formerly known as ÅŒmi Lake, is the largest fresh water lake in Japan, located in Shiga Prefecture (west-central Honshu), northeast of the former capital city of Kyoto. ... For other uses, see Kyoto (disambiguation). ... Lake Kasumigaura ) is the second largest lake in Japan, located 60 km to the north-east of Tōkyō. Lake Kasumigaura is actually the name given to a group of attached lakes, which includes the main lake, Nishiura (西浦), and two smaller lakes, Kitaura (北浦)and Sotonasakaura (外浪逆浦), and also encompasses the rivers...


Led by pearl pioneer John Latendresse and his wife Chessy, the United States began farming freshwater cultured pearls in the mid 1960's. National Geographic Magazine introduced the American cultured pearl as a commercial product in their August 1985 issue. The Tennessee pearl farm has emerged as a tourist destination in recent years. John Latendresse (July 26, 1925 – July 23, 2000) is known for being the father of American cultured freshwater pearls. He was the first successful North American freshwater cultured pearl farmer and was voted one of the pearl industrys most important people of the century. ... Freshwater cultured pearls are farmed in the freshwaters of China, Japan and the United States. ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ...


In the 1990s, Japanese pearl producers also invested in producing cultured pearls with freshwater mussels in the region of Shanghai, China, and in Fiji. Freshwater pearls are characterized by the reflection of rainbow colors in the luster.[citation needed] Cultured pearls are also produced using abalone.[citation needed] Subclasses Pteriomorpha (marine mussels) Palaeoheterodonta (freshwater mussels) Heterodonta (zebra mussels) The common name mussel is used for members of several different families of clams or bivalve molluscs, from both saltwater and freshwater habitats. ... Alternate meanings: See Shanghai (disambiguation) Shanghai (Chinese: 上海; pinyin: shàng hǎi; Shanghainese IPA: /zɑ̃ hɛ/) is Chinas largest city and is situated on the banks of the Chang Jiang delta. ... Freshwater pearls are a kind of pearl that comes from freshwater mussels. ... Species Many, see species section. ...


Pearls in jewelry

The value of the pearls in jewelry is determined by a combination of the luster, color, size, lack of surface flaw and symmetry that are appropriate for the type of pearl under consideration. Among those attributes, luster is the most important differentiator of pearl quality according to jewelers. All factors being equal, however, the larger the pearl the more valuable it is. Large, perfectly round pearls are rare and highly valued. Teardrop-shaped pearls are often used in pendants. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x3071, 737 KB) Description: Title: nl: Het meisje met de parel de: Das Mädchen mit der Perle en: The Girl with a Pearl Earring Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 46,5 × 40 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x3071, 737 KB) Description: Title: nl: Het meisje met de parel de: Das Mädchen mit der Perle en: The Girl with a Pearl Earring Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 46,5 × 40 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande... For other uses, see Girl with a Pearl Earring (disambiguation). ...

Inexpensive, button-shape cultured freshwater pearls used in a necklace and bracelet.
Inexpensive, button-shape cultured freshwater pearls used in a necklace and bracelet.

Pearls come in eight basic shapes: round, semi-round, button, drop, pear, oval, baroque, and circled. Perfectly round pearls are the rarest and most valuable shape. Semi-rounds are also used in necklaces or in pieces where the shape of the pearl can be disguised to look like it is a perfectly round pearl. Button pearls are like a slightly flattened round pearl and can also make a necklace, but are more often used in single pendants or earrings where the back half of the pearl is covered, making it look like a larger, round pearl. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 599 KB) Authors own picture. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 599 KB) Authors own picture. ...

Woman with a Pearl Necklace, by Jan Vermeer van Delft
Woman with a Pearl Necklace, by Jan Vermeer van Delft

Drop and pear shaped pearls are sometimes referred to as teardrop pearls and are most often seen in earrings, pendants, or as a center pearl in a necklace. Baroque pearls have a different appeal to them than more standard shapes because they are often highly irregular and make unique and interesting shapes. They are also commonly seen in necklaces. Circled pearls are characterized by concentric ridges, or rings, around the body of the pearl. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x1803, 220 KB) Description: Title: de: Das Perlenhalsband en: Woman with a Pearl Necklace Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 55 × 45 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Holland) Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Gemäldegalerie... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1576x1803, 220 KB) Description: Title: de: Das Perlenhalsband en: Woman with a Pearl Necklace Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 55 × 45 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Holland) Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Gemäldegalerie...

Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy, owned one of the most famous collection of natural pearls
Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy, owned one of the most famous collection of natural pearls

In general, cultured pearls are less valuable than natural pearls, and imitation pearls are less valuable than cultured pearls. One way that jewelers can determine whether a pearl is cultivated or natural is to have a gem lab perform an x-ray of the pearl. If the x-ray reveals a nucleus, the pearl is likely a bead-nucleated saltwater pearl. If no nucleus is present, but irregular and small dark inner spots indicating a cavity are visible, combined with concentric rings of organic substance, the pearl is likely a cultured freshwater. Cultured freshwater pearls can often be confused for natural pearls which present as homogeneous pictures which continuously darken toward the surface of the pearl. Natural pearls will often show larger cavities where organic matter has dried out and decomposed. Margherita of Savoy Margherita or Margaret of Savoy (born November 20, 1851 in Turin, died January 4, 1926 in Bordighera), was the Queen consort of Italy during the reign (1878-1900) of her husband, Humbert I. She was the daughter of Ferdinand, Duke of Genoa and granddaughter of Carlo Alberto... Freshwater pearls are a kind of pearl that comes from freshwater mussels. ...


Some imitation pearls are simply made of mother-of-pearl, coral or conch, while others are made from glass and are coated with a solution containing fish scales called essence d'Orient. Although imitation pearls look the part, they do not have the same weight or smoothness as real pearls, and their luster will also dim greatly. A piece of nacre Nacre, also known as mother of pearl, is an organic mixture of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the form of platy crystals of aragonite and conchiolin (a scleroprotein). ... Extant Subclasses and Orders Alcyonaria    Alcyonacea    Helioporacea Zoantharia    Antipatharia    Corallimorpharia    Scleractinia    Zoanthidea [1][2]  See Anthozoa for details For other uses, see Coral (disambiguation). ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis Strombus tricornis Strombus canarium Strombus dolomena Strombus gibberulus Strombus conomurex Strombus lentigo Strombus doxander Strombus urceus Strombus fragilis Strombus gallus Strombus dentatus Strombus marginatus Strombus raninus Strombus buvonius A conch (pronounced in the U.S.A. as konk or conch, IPA: or ) [1...


There is also a unique way of naming pearl necklaces. While most other necklaces are simply referred to by their physical measurement, strings of pearls have their own set of names that characterize the pearls based on where they hang when worn around the neck. A collar will sit directly against the throat and not hang down the neck at all; they are often made up of multiple strands of pearls. Pearl chokers nestle just at the base of the neck. The size called a princess comes down to or just below the collarbone. A matinee of pearls falls just above the breasts. An opera will be long enough to reach the breastbone or sternum of the wearer, and longer still, a pearl rope is any length that falls down farther than an opera.


Necklaces can also be classified as uniform, or graduated. In a uniform strand of pearls, all pearls are classified as the same size, but actually fall in a range. A uniform strand of akoya pearls, for example, will measure within 0.5 mm. So a strand will never be 7 mm, but will be 6.5-7 mm. Freshwater pearls, Tahitian pearls, and South Sea pearls all measure to a full millimeter when considered uniform. A graduated strand of pearls most often has at least 3 mm of differentiation from the ends to the center of the necklace. Popularized in the 1950s by the GIs bringing strands of cultured akoya pearls home from Japan, the graduated style was much more affordable as most pearls in any given strand were small.


Earrings and necklaces can also be classified on the grade of the color of the pearl. While white and more recently black pearls are by far the most popular colors other tinges of color can be found on pearls. Pink, blue, champagne, green and even purple can be found, but to form a complete string of same size and shade pearls can take years. Some colors like purple can only be found in certain types of clams, while other clams can produce a variety of colors if given the right environment.


Religious references

According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word Yahalom in the verse Exodus 28:18 means "pearl" and was the stone on the Hoshen representing the tribe of Zebulun. This is extremely disputed among scholars, particularly since the word in question in most manuscripts is actually Yasepheh - the word from which jasper derives; scholars think that refers to green jasper (the rarest and most prized form in early times) rather than red jasper (the most common form). Yahalom is usually translated by the Septuagint as an "onyx", but sometimes as "beryl" or as "jasper"; onyx only started being mined after the Septuagint was written, so the Septuagint's term "onyx" probably does not mean onyx - onyx is originally an Assyrian word meaning ring, and so could refer to anything used for making rings. Yahalom is similar to a Hebrew word meaning hit hard, so some people think that it means diamond. The variation in possibilities of meaning for this sixth stone in the Hoshen is reflected in different translations of the Bible — the King James Version translates the sixth stone as diamond, the New International Version translates it as emerald, and the Vulgate translates it as jaspis — meaning jasper. There is a wide range of views among traditional sources about which tribe the stone refers to. Not to be confused with Bahya ibn Paquda. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... The Hoshen (Khosen) was the breastplate of Judgment worn by the High Priest in the book of Exodus in the Bible, covered by 12 stones that represented the 12 tribes of Israel. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Polished jasper pebble, one inch (2. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ... This article is about the mineral. ... Three varieties of beryl: Morganite, Aquamarine, and Heliodor The mineral beryl is a beryllium aluminium cyclosilicate with the chemical formula Be3Al2(SiO3)6. ... blah ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... This article is about the mineral. ... The New International Version (NIV) is an English translation of the Christian Bible which is the most popular of the modern translations of the Bible made in the twentieth century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century version in Latin, partly revised and partly translated by Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I in 382. ...


In a Christian New Testament parable, Jesus compared the Kingdom of Heaven to a "pearl of great price" in Matthew 13: 45-46. "Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it." Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... // For a comparison of parable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Kingdom of Heaven (or the Kingdom of God, Hebrew מלכות השמים, malkhut hashamayim, Greek basileia tou theou) is a key concept detailed in all the three major monotheistic religions of the world — Islam, Judaism and Christianity. ... Illustration of the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price, by John Everett Millais, from Parables of our Lord (1864) The Parable of the Pearl or the Pearl of Great Price is a parable told by Jesus in explaining the value of the Kingdom of Heaven, according to Matthew 13...


The language of symbolism was in common use around the time of Jesus Christ and most people knew this language. The Circle is a symbol of God, it has no beginning and no end. The circle or pearl was considered to represent Love, Knowledge (the combination of equal amounts of Love and Knowledge is a symbol of Wisdom, the 2 circles intertwined (owl eyes) is symbolic of Wisdom. Some other pearls are Truth, and Faith.


The Pearl of Great Price is a book of scripture in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Pearl of Great Price is part of the standard works of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormonism) and some other Latter Day Saint denominations. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ...


The twelve gates of the New Jerusalem are reportedly each made of a single pearl in Revelation 21:21, that is, the Pearly Gates. "And the twelve gates were twelve pearls; every several gate was of one pearl: and the street of the city was pure gold, as it were transparent glass." Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... The Pearly gates, in Christianity, is an informal name for the gateway to Heaven, inspired by the description of the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21:21— The image of the gates in popular culture is a set of large, white, wrought-iron gates in the clouds, guarded by Saint Peter. ...


Pearls are compared to holy things, in Matthew 7: 6. "Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you."


Pearls are also found in numerous references showing the wickedness and pride of a people, as in Revelations 18: 16. "And saying, Alas, alas, that great city, that was clothed in fine linen, and purple, and scarlet, and decked with gold, and precious stones, and pearls!"


The metaphor of a pearl appears in the longer Hymn of the Pearl, a poem respected for its high literary quality, and use of layered theological metaphor, found within one of the texts of Gnosticism. The Hymn of the Pearl (also The Hymn of the Soul or The Hymn of Judas Thomas the Apostle) is a passage of the apocryphal Acts of Thomas. ... Gnosticism (Greek: gnōsis, knowledge) refers to a diverse, syncretistic religious movement consisting of various belief systems generally united in the teaching that humans are divine souls trapped in a material world created by an imperfect spirit, the demiurge, who is frequently identified with the Abrahamic God. ...


Islamic references

In Islam, the Koran often mentions that dwellers of paradise will be adorned with pearls: The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ...


22:23 God will admit those who believe and work righteous deeds, to Gardens beneath which rivers flow: they shall be adorned therein with bracelets of gold and pearls; and their garments there will be of silk.


35:33 Gardens of Eternity will they enter: therein will they be adorned with bracelets of gold and pearls; and their garments there will be of silk.


The Quran describes the wives of the people of Paradise as having eyes that are similar to pearls:


56:22-23 And [there will be] Houris with wide lovely eyes [as wives for the pious], Like unto preserved pearls.


The handsome young boys in paradise are similarly depicted:


52:24 Round about them will serve, [devoted] to them, youths [handsome] as Pearls well-guarded.


Hindu astrological belief in natural pearls

The Vedic tradition describes the sacred Nine Pearls which were first documented in the Garuda Purana, one of the books of the Hindu holy text Atharvaveda. Ayurveda contains references to pearl powder as a stimulant of digestion and to treat mental ailments. According to Marco Polo the kings of Malabar (now known as the Coromandel Coast) wore a necklace of 104 rubies and 104 precious pearls which was given from one generation of kings to the next. The reason was that every king had to say 104 prayers to his "idols" every morning and every evening.[9] At least until the beginning of the 20th century it was a Hindu custom to present a completely new, undrilled pearl and pierce it during the ceremony.[9] This article discusses the historical religious practices in the Vedic time period; see Dharmic religions for details of contemporary religious practices. ... The Nine Pearls, sometimes known as the Nava Moti (or nine gems, or mani), are a group of sacred gemstones described in the Vedic text known as the Garuda Purana. ... Garuda Purana is one of the Puranas which are part of the Hindu body of texts known as the smriti. ... The Atharvaveda (Sanskrit: अथर्ववेद, , a tatpurusha compound of , a type of priest, and meaning knowledge) is a sacred text of Hinduism, and one of the four Vedas, often called the fourth Veda. According to tradition, the Atharvaveda was mainly composed by two groups of rishis known as the Bhrigus and the... Districts along the Coromandel Coast Map of the coast (French) The Coromandel Coast is the name given to the southeastern coast of the Indian peninsula. ...


See also

Pearl Market in Beijing, China
Pearl Market in Beijing, China

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1711 KB) Summary Photo taken in 2004 at the famous Pearl Market in Beijing. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1711 KB) Summary Photo taken in 2004 at the famous Pearl Market in Beijing. ... Ammolite is a rare and valuable opal-like organic gemstone found primarily along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains of the United States and Canada. ... Baroque Tahitian pearls mounted with diamonds and platinum as earrings Baroque pearls are simply pearls that have an irregular shape. ... Broome is a pearling and tourist town in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, 2200 km north of Perth. ... “Mother of Pearl” redirects here. ... The Pearl Fishers (In French, Les pêcheurs de perles) is a three-act opera by Georges Bizet, to a libretto by Eugène Cormon and Michael Carré. While not nearly as popular as his far more famous Carmen, it contains a wealth of attractive music and has found some... Pearl diver in Japan Pearl hunting or pearl diving refers to a now largely obsolete method of retrieving pearls from oysters and, on rare occasions, other nacre-producing creatures, such as abalone. ... Species Pinctada maxima Pinctada margaritifera Pinctada fucata Pinctada radiata Pinctada albina Pinctada virens Pinctada chemnitzi Pinctada maculata Pinctada nigra Pinctada atropurpurea Pinctada laosensis Pinctada martensi The Pearl Oysters are the genus Pinctada of bivalve molluscs. ... For other uses, see Oyster (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ Neil H. Landman, et al (2001) Pearls: A Natural History, Harry Abrams, Inc., 232 pp., ISBN 0-8109-4495-2 Reviewed: http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Publications/ZooGoer/2002/1/books.cfm
  2. ^ Pearl oyster farming and pearl culture http://www.fao.org/docrep/field/003/AB726E/AB726E11.htm
  3. ^ How Pearls are Formed: The Pearl Sac Theory http://www.perlas.com.mx/english/pearlsac.html
  4. ^ Hanni, H A (Juni 2006). "Keshi Perlen: Ein Erklarungbedurftiger Begriff (Keshi Pearls a term in need of explanation". Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gemologischen Gesellschaft 55 (1-2): 39-50. DGemG. Retrieved on 2007-05-31. 
  5. ^ [1] (History of The Pearl of Allah).
  6. ^ [2] Pearl Weight and The Pearl of Lao Tzu.
  7. ^ [3] The origin of the Japanese akoya
  8. ^ Fred Ward, (2002) Pearls (Fred Ward Gem Book), 3rd Edition,Gem Guides Book Company, pgs. 35-36, ISBN 188765108X
  9. ^ a b "Kunz, Book of the Pearl, New York, The Century Company, 1908, pages 412, 350)

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Pearls
  • The History of Pearls. PBS Pearl History Special.
  • UT Geological Department on Pearls
  • A list of the world's famous pearls
  • Pearls and Pearling life by Edwin Streeter
  • George Frederick Kunz Book of the Pearl Book available in html and in pdf from the Gem and Diamond Foundation
For the Korean music group, see Jewelry (group). ... For the CSI episode of the same name, see Precious Metal (CSI episode). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see Palladium (disambiguation). ... General Name, Symbol, Number platinum, Pt, 78 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 10, 6, d Appearance grayish white Standard atomic weight 195. ... General Name, Symbol, Number rhodium, Rh, 45 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 9, 5, d Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight 102. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... An alloy is a homogeneous hybrid of two or more elements, at least one of which is a metal, and where the resulting material has metallic properties. ... Electrum coin of the Byzantine Emperor Alexius I Comnenus. ... Rose gold is a gold and copper alloy widely used for specialized jewelry due to its reddish color. ... Sterling silver is an alloy of silver containing 92. ... White gold is an alloy of gold and at least one white metal, such as silver or palladium. ... In chemistry, the term base metal is used informally to refer to a metal that oxidizes or corrodes relatively easily, and reacts variably with diluted hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form hydrogen. ... Brazen redirects here. ... This article is about the metal alloy. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... The 630 foot (192 m) high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... Aventurine is used for a number of applications, including landscape stone, building stone, aquaria, monuments, and jewelry. ... For other uses, see Agate (disambiguation). ... The mineral or gemstone chrysoberyl, not to be confused with beryl, is an aluminate of beryllium with the formula BeAl2O4. ... For other uses, see Amethyst (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mineral. ... Imprint of a carnelian seal with Brahmi inscription Kusumadasasya (Flowers servant). 4-5th century CE, probably Punjab. ... Citrine Citrine, also called citrine quartz is an amber-colored gemstone. ... This article is about the mineral. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Garnet (disambiguation). ... A selection of antique, hand-crafted Chinese jade (jadeite) buttons Unworked Jade Jade is used as an ornamental stone, the term jade is applied to two different rocks that are made up of different silicate minerals. ... Polished jasper pebble, one inch (2. ... For other uses, see Malachite (disambiguation). ... Lapis lazuli, also known as just lapis, is one of the stones with the longest tradition of being considered a gem, with a history stretching back to 5000 BC. Deep blue in color and opaque, this gemstone was highly prized by the pharaohs of ancient Egypt, as can be seen... Moonstone is typically a potassium aluminium silicate, with the chemical formula KAlSi3O8 [1] The most common moonstone is of the mineral Adularia. ... This article is about the mineral. ... For other uses, see Opal (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mineral. ... For other uses, see Quartz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mineral. ... For other uses, see Sapphire (disambiguation). ... Sodalite is a rare, rich royal blue mineral widely enjoyed as an ornamental stone. ... Sunstone, a feldspar exhibiting in certain directions a brilliant spangled appearance, which has led to its use as an ornamental stone. ... Tanzanite is the blue/purple variety of the mineral zoisite discovered in the Meralani Hills of northern Tanzania in 1967, near the city of Arusha. ... Polished tigers eye gemstone Tigers eye (also Tigers eye, Tiger eye) is a chatoyant gemstone that is usually yellow- to red-brown, with a silky luster. ... This article is about the mineral or gemstone. ... For other uses, see Gemstone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Amber (disambiguation). ... Copal is a type of resin, sometimes referred to as pom (the Maya language name). ... Precious coral or red coral is the common name given to Corallium rubrum and several related species of marine coral. ... A sample of jet Jet is a geological material that is not considered a mineral in the true sense of the word, but rather, a mineraloid derived from decaying wood under extreme pressure, thus organic in origin. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
PEARL main (3105 words)
Pearls of different colors are often associated with their place of origin; Persian Gulf pearls are creamy white; Sri Lankan are a paler white; Australian are white or silvery; Tahitian and Mexican are gray-fl to reddish-brown; West Indies are rose red with wavy lines; "Indian" (actually Sri Lankan) may be a faint rose color.
In modern cultured pearls the nucleus, which is a bead composed of freshwater clam shell wrapped with a strip of the mollusks mantle, is placed within the mantle or gonad of the bivalve, away from the shell, allowing it to grow freely.
Dying cultured white pearls to pink is also a practice that has seen widespread use, but can be detected in drilled pearls by examining the drill hole to look for an uneven concentration of color.
Pearl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1583 words)
Pearl is valued as a gemstone and is cultivated or harvested for jewellery.
Freshwater pearls are characterized by the reflection of rainbow colors in the luster.
The value of the pearls in jewelry is determined by a combination of the luster, color, size, lack of surface flaw and symmetry that are appropriate for the type of pearl under consideration.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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