FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Peacock throne

The Peacock Throne, called Takht-e-Tavous (Persian: تخت طائوس) in Persian, is the name originally of a Mughal throne, later used to describe the thrones of the Persian emperors from Nader Shah Afshari to Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. Persian is a language spoken in Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Persian is a language spoken in Iran, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... His Majesty Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (اعلیحضرت محمدرضا شاه پهلوی; October 26, 1919 – July 27, 1980) also knows as Aryamehr, was the last Shah of Iran, ruling from 1941 until 1979. ...


History

The name comes from the shape of a throne, having the figures of two peacocks standing behind it, their tails being expanded and the whole so inlaid with sapphires, rubies, emeralds, pearls and other precious stones of appropriate colors as to represent life, created for the Mughal (Hindustani) Padshah Shah Jahan in the 17th century, which was in his imperial capital Delhi's Public audience hall, the Diwan-i-Am. The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Padishah, Badishah, or Badshah is a title sometimes applied to to a several historic monarchs, notably the rulers of Iran, the Ottoman Empire, and the Moghul Empire. ... Shahbuddin Mohammed Shah Jahan (also spelled Shah Jehan, Shahjehan. ... Divan (like the ministerial title, the word derives from the furniture type) was a high governmental body in a number of Islamic states, or metonymically its . ...


The French jeweller Tavernier, who saw Delhi in 1665, described the throne as of the shape of a bed (a "takhta" i.e. platform), 6 ft. by 4 ft., supported by four golden feet, 20 to 25 in. high, from the bars above which rose twelve columns to support the canopy; the bars were decorated with crosses of rubies and emeralds, and also with diamonds and pearls. In all there were 108 large rubies on the throne, and 116 emeralds, but many of the latter had flaws. The twelve columns supporting the canopy were decorated with rows of splendid pearls, and Tavernier considered these to be the most valuable part of the throne. Estimates of its value varied: Rs. 4 crore (Bernier) and Rs. 10 crore (Tavernier) [1]. A crore is a unit in the Indian numbering system, still widely used in Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. ...


Shahanshah Nader Shah invaded the Mughal empire in 1738, and returned to Persia in 1739 with the original Peacock Throne as well as many other treasures as tribute from the Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah. Shananshah (Persian: شاهنشاه) (sometimes written Shahenshah, Shan-an-shah, or Shan-en-shah) was a title used by various rulers of Persia/Iran. ... Nadir Shah (Nadir Qoli Beg, also Tahmasp-Qoli Khan) (October 22, 1688 - June, 1747) ruled as Shah of Persia 1736-1747 and was the founder of the Afsharid dynasty. ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Events February 4 - Court Jew Joseph Suss Oppenheimer is executed in Württenberg April 15 - Premiere in London of Serse, an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... The Mughal Empire (alternative spelling Mogul, which is the origin of the word Mogul) of India was founded by Babur in 1526, when he defeated Ibrahim Lodi, the last of the Delhi Sultans at the First Battle of Panipat. ... Muhammad Shah (1702 – 1748) was a Mughal emperor of India between 1719 and 1748. ...

The Peacock Throne in Golestan Palace, Iran
The Peacock Throne in Golestan Palace, Iran

Since then, the term Peacock Throne has come to refer not only to the actual throne, but to the Iranian monarchy itself. Image File history File links Peacock_Throne. ... Image File history File links Peacock_Throne. ...


After Nader Shah was assassinated in 1747, the original Peacock Throne was destroyed in the chaos that ensued. However, later Iranian thrones were referred to Peacock Thrones, although they resemble a chair rather than a platform. An example of such a throne is the Naderi Throne, built in 1812 for Fath Ali Shah Qajar. Another Iranian throne, built in 1836 for Mohammad Shah Qajar, is also called the Peacock Throne. Nadir Shah (Nadir Qoli Beg, also Tahmasp-Qoli Khan) (October 22, 1688 - June, 1747) ruled as Shah of Persia 1736-1747 and was the founder of the Afsharid dynasty. ... // Events January 31 - The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Dock Hospital April 9 - The Scottish Jacobite Lord Lovat was beheaded by axe on Tower Hill, London, for high treason; he was the last man to be executed in this way in Britain May 14 - First battle of Cape... 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Fath Ali Shah in 1798 Fath Ali Shah (Persian: السلطان فتحعلى شاه قاجار ) (1771 - 1834) was the second Qajar King of Persia. ... Charles Darwin 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Mohammad Shah (1810 - 1848) was the Qajar king of Persia between 1835 and 1848. ...


See also

The Iranian Imperial Crown Jewels, also called the Imperial Crown Jewels of Persia, is a set of crowns, diamonds, thrones and other items collected by the various people who were the Shah of Iran (Persia) during the 2,500 year existence of the monarchy. ... The Koh-i-noor (Persian: کوۂ نور, Mountain of Light; also spelled Kohinoor, Koh-i-Noor or Koh-i-Nur), is a 105 carat (21. ... The Darya-ye Noor (Persian for Sea of Light), is one of the largest diamonds in the world, weighing in at approximately 182 carats. ...

Sources and External links

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. - Delhi Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  • The Imperial Jewels of Iran
  • The Peacock Throne Includes pictures of the actual Peacock Throne in Golestan Palace
  • The Peacock Throne
  • The Naderi Throne A later throne based on the Peacock Throne
  • The Naderi Throne
  • KN Diamond With the UK

  Results from FactBites:
 
Iranian National -Royal- Jewels (666 words)
Chair-like thrones like this were used in ancient Iran by Achaemenid dynasty in the 5th century BC, as well as the 17th century Safavid dynasty.
The height of the throne is approximately 225 cm.
Among the 26,733 jewels covering the throne, there are four very large spinels on the backrest, the largest of which is 65 cts.; there are also four very large emeralds on the backrest too, the largest of which is approximately 225 cts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     

AMRIT
11th July 2010
REALLY ITS DESTROYED AND WHERE IS TRONE NOW?

Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m