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Encyclopedia > Peach
paech
Foliage and fruit
Foliage and fruit
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Amygdalus
Species: P. persica
Binomial name
Prunus persica
(L.) Batsch
Peaches (edible part)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 40 kcal   170 kJ
Carbohydrates     9.5 g
- Sugars  8.4 g
- Dietary fibre  1.5 g  
Fat 0.3 g
Protein 0.9 g
Vitamin A equiv.  16 μg  2%
Vitamin C  6.6 mg 11%
Iron  0.25 mg 2%
Potassium  190 mg   4%
Percentages are relative to US
recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

The peach (Prunus persica) is a species of Prunus native to China that bears an edible juicy fruit also called a peach. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1016 × 1356 pixel, file size: 615 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Prunus persica File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Scientific classification redirects here. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants or angiosperms are the most widespread group of land plants. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class of flowering plants. ... Families Barbeyaceae Cannabaceae (hemp family) Dirachmaceae Elaeagnaceae Moraceae (mulberry family) Rosaceae (rose family) Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Ulmaceae (elm family) Urticaceae (nettle family) For the Philippine municipality, see Rosales, Pangasinan. ... Global distribution of Rosaceae Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... Species Old World: Prunus africana Prunus apetala Prunus armeniaca Prunus avium Prunus buergeriana Prunus campanulata Prunus canescens Prunus cerasifera Prunus cerasoides Prunus cerasus Prunus cocomilia Prunus cornuta Prunus crassifolia Prunus davidiana Prunus domestica Prunus dulcis Prunus fruticosa Prunus geniculata Prunus glandulosa Prunus gracilis Prunus grayana Prunus incana Prunus incisa Prunus... Latin name redirects here. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Lactose is a disaccharide found in milk. ... Dietary fibers are the indigestible portion of plant foods that move food through the digestive system, absorbing water and making defecation easier. ... For other uses, see FAT. Fats consist of a wide group of compounds that are generally soluble in organic solvents and largely insoluble in water. ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... The structure of retinol, the most common dietary form of vitamin A Vitamin A is an essential human nutrient. ... This article is about the nutrient. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... General Name, symbol, number potassium, K, 19 Chemical series alkali metals Group, period, block 1, 4, s Appearance silvery white Standard atomic weight 39. ... Reference Daily Intake (RDI) is the daily dietary intake level of a nutrient considered sufficient to meet the requirements of nearly all (97–98%) healthy individuals in each life-stage and gender group. ... Species Old World: Prunus africana Prunus apetala Prunus armeniaca Prunus avium Prunus buergeriana Prunus campanulata Prunus canescens Prunus cerasifera Prunus cerasoides Prunus cerasus Prunus cocomilia Prunus cornuta Prunus crassifolia Prunus davidiana Prunus domestica Prunus dulcis Prunus fruticosa Prunus geniculata Prunus glandulosa Prunus gracilis Prunus grayana Prunus incana Prunus incisa Prunus...


It is a deciduous tree growing to 5–10 m tall, belonging to the subfamily Prunoideae of the family Rosaceae. It is classified with the almond in the subgenus Amygdalus within the genus Prunus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated seed shell. For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Genera Prunus Prinsepia Prunoideae, also called Amygdaloideae, is the subfamily containing the genera Prunus and Prinsepia. ... Global distribution of Rosaceae Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... For other uses, see Almond (disambiguation). ...


The leaves are lanceolate, 7–15 cm long and 2–3 cm broad. The flowers are produced in early spring before the leaves; they are solitary or paired, 2.5–3 cm diameter, pink, with five petals. The fruit is a drupe, with a single large seed encased in hard wood (called the "stone" or "pit"), yellow or whitish flesh, a delicate aroma, and a skin that is either velvety (peaches) or smooth (nectarines) in different cultivars. The flesh is very delicate and easily bruised in some cultivars, but is fairly firm in some commercial cultivars, especially when green. The seed is red-brown, oval shaped and 1.5-2 cm long. Peaches, along with cherries, plums and apricots, are stone fruits (drupes). Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lanceolate refers to a narrow oval shape that is pointed at both ends. ... For other uses, see Flower (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit) In botany, a drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp or skin and mesocarp or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Prunus armeniaca L. For other uses, see Apricot (disambiguation). ... The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit) In botany, a drupe is a type of fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp or skin and mesocarp or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside. ...


The scientific name persica, along with the word "peach" itself and its cognates in many European languages, derives from an early European belief that peaches were native to Persia (now Iran). The modern botanical consensus is that they originate in China, and were introduced to Persia and the Mediterranean region along the Silk Road before Christian times.[1] Cultivated peaches are divided into "freestone" and "clingstone" cultivars, depending on whether the flesh sticks to the stone or not; both kinds can have either white or yellow flesh. Peaches with white flesh typically are very sweet with little acidity, while yellow-fleshed peaches typically have an acidic tang coupled with sweetness, though this also varies greatly. Both colours often have some red on their skin. Low-acid white-fleshed peaches are the most popular kinds in China, Japan, and neighbouring Asian countries, while Europeans and North Americans have historically favoured the acidic, yellow-fleshed kinds. Persia redirects here. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see Silk Road (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see acid (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... North American redirects here. ...

Contents

History Of The Peach

Although its botanical name, Prunus persica, suggests the peach is native to Persia, it actually originated in China where it has been cultivated since the early days of Chinese culture. Peaches were mentioned in Chinese writings as far back as the tenth century B.C and were a favored fruit of emperors.


Its English name derives from the Latin plural of persicum malum, meaning Persian apple. In Middle English, it melded into peche, much closer to what we call it today.


The Persians brought the peach from China and passed it on to the Romans. The peach was brought to America by Spanish explorers in the sixteenth century and eventually made it to England and France in the seventeenth century, where it was a popular albeit rare treat. In Queen Victoria's day, no meal was complete without a fresh peach presented in a fancy cotton napkin.


Various American Indian tribes are credited with migrating the peach tree across the United States, taking seeds along with them and planting as they roved the country.


Although Thomas Jefferson had peach trees at Monticello, United States farmers did not begin commercial production until the nineteenth century in Maryland, Delaware, Georgia and finally Virginia. Although the Southern states lead in commercial production of peaches, they are also California, Michigan, and Colorado.


Today, peaches are the second largest commercial fruit crop in the States, second only to apples. Italy, China and Greece are major producers of peaches outside of the United States


Cultivation

Harvested peaches
Harvested peaches

Peach trees grow very well in a fairly limited range, since they have a chilling requirement that subtropical areas cannot satisfy, and they are not very cold-hardy. The trees themselves can usually tolerate temperatures to around −26 °C to −30 °C, although the following season's flower buds are usually killed at these temperatures, leading to no crop that summer. Flower bud kill begins to occur at temperatures between −15 °C and −25 °C depending on the cultivar (some are more cold-tolerant than others) and the timing of the cold, with the buds becoming less cold tolerant in late winter.[2] Certain cultivars are more tender and others can tolerate a few degrees more cold. In addition, a lot of summer heat is required to mature the crop, with mean temperatures of the hottest month between 20 °C and 30 °C. Another problematic issue in many peach-growing areas is spring frost. The trees tend to flower fairly early in spring. The flowers can often be damaged or killed by freezes; typically, if temperatures drop below about −4 °C, most flowers will be killed. However, if the flowers are not fully open, they can tolerate a couple of degrees colder. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Certain deciduous plants (e. ... This Osteospermum Pink Whirls is a successful cultivar. ...

Peach and nectarine output in 2005
Peach and nectarine output in 2005

Important historical peach-producing areas are China and Iran, France, and the Mediterranean countries like Italy, Spain and Greece. More recently, the United States (where the three largest producing states are California, South Carolina[3], and Georgia[4]), Canada (southern Ontario and British Columbia), and Australia (the Riverland region) have also become important. Oceanic climate areas like the Pacific Northwest and coastline of North Western Europe are generally not satisfactory for peach growing due to inadequate summer heat, though they are sometimes grown trained against south-facing walls to catch extra heat from the sun. Trees grown in a sheltered and south-facing position in the southeast of England are capable of producing both flowers and a large crop of fruit. Peach trees are the second most commonly cultivated fruit trees in the world after apple trees[citation needed]. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of peach and nectarine output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (China - 6,030,000 tonnes). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 351 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 625 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/png)This bubble map shows the global distribution of peach and nectarine output in 2005 as a percentage of the top producer (China - 6,030,000 tonnes). ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... The Riverland is a tourism and wine region in South Australia. ... World map showing the oceanic climate zones. ... The Pacific Northwest from space The Pacific Northwest, abbreviated PNW, or PacNW is a region in the northwest of North America. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Nectarines

Nectarine
Nectarine

The nectarine is a cultivar group of peach that has a smooth, fuzzless skin. Though fuzzy peaches and nectarines are commercially regarded as different fruits, with nectarines often erroneously believed to be a crossbreed between peaches and plums, or a "peach with a plum skin", they belong to the same species as peaches. Several genetic studies have concluded in fact that nectarines are created due to a recessive gene, whereas a fuzzy peach skin is dominant.[5] Nectarines have arisen many times from peach trees, often as bud sports. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1067x1600, 452 KB) Nectarines File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Peach User talk:Srikeit/archive 6 ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1067x1600, 452 KB) Nectarines File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Peach User talk:Srikeit/archive 6 ... Under the ICNCP, a Cultivar Group is a gathering of cultivars. ... Species See text. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dominance relationship. ... In genetics, the term dominant gene refers to the allele that causes a phenotype that is seen in a heterozygous genotype. ... A bud sport is a part of a plant or tree — for example, a leaf, shoot or flower — which due to a genetic mutation clearly differs from the rest of the plant, and which can also be grafted to grow new plants which retain this genetic difference. ...


As with peaches, nectarines can be white or yellow, and clingstone or freestone. On average, nectarines are slightly smaller and sweeter than peaches, but with much overlap.[5] The lack of skin fuzz can make nectarine skins appear more reddish than those of peaches, contributing to the fruit's plum-like appearance. The lack of down on the skin also means their skin is more easily bruised than peaches.


The history of the nectarine is unclear; the first recorded mention in English is from 1616,[6] but they had probably been grown much earlier within the native range of the Peach in central and eastern Asia. Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Regular peach trees occasionally produce a few nectarines, and vice versa.


Diseases

The trees are prone to a disease called leaf curl, which usually does not directly affect the fruit but does reduce the crop yield by partially defoliating the tree. The fruit is very susceptible to brown rot. This article is a list of diseases of peaches and nectarines (Peach: Prunus persica; Nectarine: var. ... a plant disease caused by a fungus (genus Taphrina) or virus (especially genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae) and characterized by curling of leaves; especially : PEACH LEAF CURL ; leaf curl of the peach that is caused by a fungus (Taphrina deformans) ... For Brown rot of trees and wood see Dry rot. ...


Planting

The development sequence of a nectarine over a 4½ month period, from flower budding to fruit ripening (see image page for further information)
The development sequence of a nectarine over a 4½ month period, from flower budding to fruit ripening (see image page for further information)

Most peach trees sold by nurseries are named cultivars grafted onto a suitable rootstock. It is also possible to grow a tree from either a peach or nectarine seed, but the fruit quality of the resulting tree will be very unpredictable. Grafted apple tree Malus sp. ...


Peaches should be located in full sun, and with good air flow. This allows cold air to flow away on frosty nights and keeps the area cool in summer. Peaches are best planted in early winter, as this allows time for the roots to establish and be able to sustain the new spring growth. When planting in rows, plant north-south.

Watering

For optimum growth, peach trees require a constant supply of water. This should be increased shortly before the harvest. The best tasting fruit is produced when the peach is watered throughout the season. Drip irrigation is ideal, at least one dripper per tree. Although it is better to use multiple drippers around the tree, this is not necessary. A quarter of the root being watered is sufficient. Drip Irrigation - A dripper in action Main article: Irrigation Drip irrigation, also known as trickle irrigation or microirrigation is an irrigation method that applies water slowly to the roots of plants, by depositing the water either on the soil surface or directly to the root zone, through a network of...

Fertilising

Peaches have a high nutrient requirement, needing more nitrogen than most other fruit trees. An NPK fertiliser can be applied regularly, and an additional mulch of poultry manure in autumn soon after the harvest will benefit the tree. If the leaves of the peach are yellow or small, the tree needs more nitrogen. Blood meal and bone meal, 3–5 kg per mature tree, or calcium ammonium nitrate, 0.5–1 kg, are suitable fertilisers. This also applies if the tree is putting forth little growth. General Name, symbol, number nitrogen, N, 7 Chemical series nonmetals Group, period, block 15, 2, p Appearance colorless gas Standard atomic weight 14. ... Fertilizers are chemicals given to plants with the intention of promoting growth; they are usually applied either via the soil or by foliar spraying. ... Blood meal is dried poo, powdered blood used as a high-nitrogen fertilizer. ... bone meal n. ...

Tips for good fruit

If the full amount of peaches is left, they will be under-sized and lacking in sugar and flavour. In dry conditions, extra watering is important. The fruit should be thinned when they have reached 2 cm in diameter, usually about 2 months after flowering. Fresh fruit are best consumed on the day of picking, and do not keep well. They are best eaten when the fruit is slightly soft, having aroma, and heated by the sun.


Peaches in Asian tradition

Pan Tao, the Chinese flat peach. Called paraguaya, too.
Pan Tao, the Chinese flat peach. Called paraguaya, too.

Peaches are known in China, Japan, Korea, Laos, and Vietnam not only as a popular fruit but for the many folktales and traditions associated with it. Momotaro, one of Japan's most noble and semi-historical heroes, was born from within an enormous peach floating down a stream. Momotaro or "Peach Boy" went on to fight evil oni and face many adventures. Peach flowers are admired by the Japanese but not as much as the sakura (cherry). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 562 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 562 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Bisque doll of Momotaro Momotaro (peach boy) is a hero from Japanese folklore. ... A statue of an Oni wielding a tetsubo. ... This article is about cherry blossoms and their cultural significance to the Japanese. ...


In China, the peach was said to be consumed by the immortals due to its mystic virtue of conferring longevity on all who ate them. The divinity Yu Huang, also called the Jade Emperor, and his mother called Xi Wangmu also known as Queen Mother of the West, ensured the gods' everlasting existence by feeding them the peaches of immortality. The immortals residing in the palace of Xi Wangmu were said to celebrate an extravagant banquet called the Pantao Hui or "The Feast of Peaches". The immortals waited six thousand years before gathering for this magnificent feast; the peach tree put forth leaves once every thousand years and it required another three thousand years for the fruit to ripen. Ivory statues depicting Xi Wangmu's attendants often held three peaches. The Jade Emperor (Chinese: ; pinyin: or 玉帝 Yù Dì), are known by many names including Heavenly Grandfather (天公 Tiān Gōng), the Pure August Jade Emperor, August Personage of Jade (玉皇上帝 Yu Huang Shangdi or 玉皇大帝 Yu Huang Dadi), is formally known as Peace-Absolving Central-August-Spirit Exalted-Ancient-Buddha-Most-Pious... Xi Wangmu (西王母), in Chinese mythology, literally Queen Mother of the West, is the ruler of the western paradise and goddess of immortality. ...


The peach often plays an important part in Chinese tradition and is symbolic of long life. One example is in the peach-gathering story of Zhang Daoling, who many say is the true founder of Taoism. Elder Zhang Guo, one of the Chinese Eight Immortals, is often depicted carrying a Peach of Immortality. The peach blossoms are also highly prized in Chinese culture, ranked slightly lower than mei blossom. Celestial Master Zhang Daoling Zhang Daoling (Chang Tao-ling), aka Zhang Ling. ... Taoism (or Daoism) refers to a variety of related Chinese philosophical and religious traditions and concepts. ... A woodcut of Zhang Guo, carrying a fish-drum. ... For other uses, see Eight Immortals (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Prunus mume Siebold & Zucc. ...


It was in an orchard of flowering peach trees that Liu Bei, Guan Yu, and Zhang Fei took an oath of brotherhood in the opening chapter of the classic Chinese novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms. This is a Chinese name; the family name is 劉 (Liu) Liú Bèi (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (161 – 223), courtesy name Xuándé (玄徳), was a powerful warlord and the founding emperor of the Kingdom of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Guan (關) Guan Yu (關羽) (160–219) was a general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of China. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhang Zhang Fei (?-221 AD) was a general of Shu Han in the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... For other uses, see Romance of the Three Kingdoms (disambiguation). ...


Due to its delicious taste and soft texture, in ancient China "peach" was also a slang word for "young bride", and it has remained in many cultures as a way to define young women (as in English, with peachy or peachy keen).


Gallery

Popular culture

Valentin Serov's The girl with peaches (1887) was the painting that inaugurated Russian Impressionism.
Valentin Serov's The girl with peaches (1887) was the painting that inaugurated Russian Impressionism.
  • The peach is the state flower of Delaware and the state fruit of South Carolina.[7][8] The state of Georgia calls itself the "Peach State".[9]
  • Cosmo Kramer, a character on Seinfeld, eats a "Mackinaw peach" which is presumed to be a peach from Oregon.
  • The peach is featured in the children's novel James and the Giant Peach.
  • Eat a Peach is the name of an album released by Georgia Southern Rock Band, The Allman Brothers Band.[10]
  • T. S. Eliot, in "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" asks "Shall I part my hair behind? Do I dare to eat a peach?"
  • Baseball player Ty Cobb was nicknamed "The Georgia Peach".[11]
  • "Peaches" is a 1994 single by The Presidents of the United States of America.
  • In the Super Mario Bros. series, there is a princess named Princess Peach.
  • In the film Labyrinth, Jareth, the Goblin King (played by David Bowie), uses a peach to induce a hallucination to slow down Sarah Williams (portrayed by Jennifer Connelly), and hinder her efforts in retrieving her stepbrother Toby.
  • The 1986 Irish film "Eat the Peach" refers to Prufrock and the idea of acting on your dreams.
  • A peach sliced in half is used as a symbolism for the vagina in many world cultures where the fruit is native (the middle and far east, especially). The visual similarity is sometimes used to replace what would otherwise be considered vulgar in description, or alternatively used in crude humor.
  • Peach harvesting and cultivation take on a large historical and symbolic role of John Steinbeck's novel, The Grapes of Wrath. Peaches grown in the Salinas Valley in California are sold as luxury cash crops and its nutritional value is not considered. This stands in marked contrast with the harvesters actually collecting the peaches, who can barely earn enough to feed their families on far less desirable foodstuffs. In this manner, peaches are also used as a literary device that recalls the story of Tantalus in Greek Mythology. Like the harvesters, Tantalus is denied food and is forced to stare at fruit in a tree that is beyond his reach.

Image File history File links Serov_devochka_s_persikami. ... Image File history File links Serov_devochka_s_persikami. ... Self-portrait, 1880ies Valentin Alexandrovich Serov (Russian: Валентин Александрович Серов) (1865 - 1911) was a Russian painter. ... This article is about the art movement. ... This is a list of U.S. state flowers: List of U.S. state trees Lists of U.S. state insignia ^ State Flower of Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... Below is a list of U.S. state fruits and berries. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... For other uses, see Seinfeld (disambiguation). ... For the 1996 film adaptation, see James and the Giant Peach (film). ... Eat a Peach is a 1972 double album by the American Southern rock group The Allman Brothers Band; it was the last to include founder member and lead slide guitar player Duane Allman, who was killed in a motorcycle accident while the album was being recorded. ... Southern rock is a subgenre of rock music. ... The Allman Brothers Band is a band from Macon, Georgia, labeled by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as the principal architects of Southern rock. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is the poem that marked the start of T. S. Eliots career as one of the twentieth centurys most influential poets. ... This article is about the sport. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... The Presidents of the United States of America has two meanings. ... This article is about the Super Mario Brothers video game for the NES. For other uses, see Super Mario Bros. ... Princess Peach ) is a video game character in Nintendos Mario video games series, often playing the damsel in distress role in the adventure series. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film, directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ... Jareth, is a fictional character in the 1986 movie Labyrinth. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... A hallucination is a perception in the absence of a stimulus that the person may or may not believe is real. ... Jennifer Lynn Connelly (born December 12, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former child model. ... The vagina, (from Latin, literally sheath or scabbard ) is the tubular tract leading from the uterus to the exterior of the body in female placental mammals and marsupials, or to the cloaca in female birds, monotremes, and some reptiles. ...

References

  1. ^ Huxley, A., ed. (1992). New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. Macmillan ISBN 0-333-47494-5.
  2. ^ Szalay, L., Papp, J., & Szaóbo, Z. (2000). Evaluation of frost tolerance of peach varieties in artificial freezing tests. In: Geibel, M., Fischer, M., & Fischer, C. (eds.). Eucarpia symposium on Fruit Breeding and Genetics. Acta Horticulturae 538. Abstract.
  3. ^ Fort Valley State University College of Agriculture: Peaches
  4. ^ Georgia Peach: Georgia Peach Study
  5. ^ a b Oregon State University: peaches and nectarines
  6. ^ Oxford English Dictionary
  7. ^ Delaware.gov - Delaware Facts and Symbols Overview
  8. ^ http://www.scstatehouse.net/studentpage/plants.htm
  9. ^ Quick Facts - The New Georgia Encyclopedia
  10. ^ The Allman Brothers Band : Discography : Rolling Stone
  11. ^ Ty Cobb Museum: Stats

The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Peaches (983 words)
In addition, grocers used to store peaches in the cold section of the produce department, which causes the peaches to deteriorate and lose their flavor.
Peaches selected when they are brightly colored but firm to moderately hard will ripen in two to three days at room temperature.
When ripe, peaches should be stored in the refrigerator until eaten, but only for a couple of days since the cold storage will reduce their juice and flavor.
Peach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1313 words)
Cultivated peaches are divided into "freestone" and "clingstone" cultivars, depending on whether the flesh sticks to the stone or not; both kinds can have either white or yellow flesh.
Peaches with white flesh typically are very sweet with little acidity, while yellow-fleshed peaches typically have an acidic tang coupled with sweetness, though this also varies greatly.
Peach trees grow very well in a fairly limited range, since they have a chilling requirement that subtropical areas cannot satisfy, and they are not very cold-hardy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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