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Encyclopedia > Peace (play)
Peace

Sketch of Aristophanes Image File history File links Aristophanes_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_12788. ...

Written by Aristophanes
Chorus husbandmen
Characters Trygaeus
servants of Trygaeus
daughters of Trygaeus
Hermes
War
Tumult
Hierocles
a sickle-maker
a crest-maker
a trumpet-maker
a helmet-maker
a spear-maker
son of Lamachus
son of Cleonymus
Setting a farmyard

Peace is a comedy written and produced by the ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes. It first appeared in 421 BC and was awarded second prize for that year in Athens. As with many of his plays, Aristophanes attacks and lampoons his contemporaries, including Euripides, Carcinus, and especially Cleon. The jubilent spirit of celebration, contrasting strongly with the sceptical tone of Aristophanes' other 'peace' plays (Lysistrata and The Acharnians), can be attributed to the fact it was written shortly after the Peace of Nicias was sworn. Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... A war is a conflict between two or more groups that involve large numbers of individuals. ... Hierocles, proconsul of Bithynia and Alexandria, lived during the reign of Diocletian (AD 284-305). ... feydey 11:57, 4 November 2005 (UTC) Category: Possible copyright violations ... Comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humour with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 426 BC 425 BC 424 BC 423 BC 422 BC - 421 BC - 420 BC 419 BC... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... Carcinus was an Ancient Greek tragedian, and was a member of a family including Xenocles (a father or uncle) and his grandfather Carcinus of Agrigentum. ... Cleon (d. ... Lysistrata (Attic: Λυσιστράτη, Doric: Λυσιστράτα), Aristophanes anti-war comedy, written in 411 BC, has female characters, led by the eponymous Lysistrata, barricading the public funds building and withholding sex from their husbands to secure peace and end the Peloponnesian War. ... The Acharnians is a comedic play by the ancient Greek satirist Aristophanes. ... The Peace of Nicias was a peace treaty that was signed between the Greek city-states of Athens and Sparta in 421 BC, ending the first half of the Peloponnesian War. ...


Plot

The elderly farmer Trygaeus is the central figure of the play. With Athens and Sparta fighting each other in the Peloponnesian War, Trygaeus mounts a giant dung beetle in the style of the hero Bellerophon mounting Pegasus and flies to heaven for an audience with Zeus, king of the gods. This part contains a great deal of toilet humour, as dung beetles feed off feces. Trygaeus' servants are ordered to roll the feces for the beetle, and the townspeople are told to hide the smells over their own so the beetle won't get tempted by it during the flight. Farmer spreading grasshopper bait in his alfalfa field. ... Sparta (Doric: , Attic: ) is a city in southern Greece. ... Combatants Delian League led by Athens Peloponnesian League led by Sparta Commanders Pericles Cleon Nicias Alcibiades Archidamus II Brasidas Lysander For the earlier war beginning in 460 BC, see First Peloponnesian War The Peloponnesian War (431 BC–404 BC) was an Ancient Greek military conflict fought between Athens and its... A dung beetle, with a shovel-like head, rolling a dung ball with its hindlegs. ... Bellerophon on Pegasus spears the Chimaera, on an Attic red-figure epinetron — 425–420 BC Bellerophon or Bellerophontes (perhaps bearing darts[1]) was a hero of Greek mythology, the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside of Kadmos and Perseus, before the days of Heracles[2]—whose greatest feat was... Pegasus and Bellerophon, Attic red-figure In Greek mythology, Pegasus (Greek name: ) was a winged horse that was the son of Poseidon, in his role as horse-god, and the Gorgon Medusa. ... Heaven is an afterlife concept found in many religions or spiritual philosophies. ... The Statue of Zeus at Olympia Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall statue of Zeus at Olympia about 435 BC. The statue was perhaps the most famous sculpture in Ancient Greece, imagined here in a 16th century engraving Zeus (in Greek: nominative: Ζεύς Zeús, genitive: Διός Díos), is... Toilet humour or potty humour (humor in American English) is a type of humour dealing with defecation, urination and other bodily functions. ... Feces, faeces, or fæces (see spelling differences) is waste product from an animals digestive tract expelled through the anus (or cloaca) during defecation. ...


When Trygaeus arrives at the halls of Zeus, all the Olympian gods save Hermes have left heaven in the hands of War and his servant Havoc. It is learned that Peace has been imprisoned in a deep pit covered in heavy stones. War and Havoc are in the middle of plotting destructions for the Greeks. Using a giant mortar and ingredients that represent the various city states, they plan on crushing them with a giant pestal. However, a giant pestal is nowhere to be found, and they become distracted in their search. The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. ... For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ... Mortar and pestle Mortar used to pulverise plant material with liquid nitrogen A mortar and pestle are two tools used in conjunction with each other to grind and mix substances. ... Mortar and pestle Mortar used to pulverise plant material with liquid nitrogen A mortar and pestle are two tools used in conjunction with each other to grind and mix substances. ...


Using this opportunity Trygaeus calls upon the chorus (farmers of various Greek city-states) to help him rescue Peace. With the aid of members of the chorus, Trygaeus attempts to remove the stones. Those whose careers profit from war, such as weapon smiths, work against them. But after a great deal of effort, Peace is finally released, and with her enter her companions Harvest and Festival. Peace is still upset over how the Greeks have treated her (such as the many denials of treaties during the Peloponnesian War), and will only talk to Trygaeus and the other Greeks through Hermes. Eventually, she is persuaded to return to Athens with the Greeks.


Trygaeus agrees to marry Harvest (Opora), and Festival is sent with another Greek to prepare a peace celebration. A sheep is chosen for the sacrifice, however no blood is allowed on the alter, as "blood cannot please Peace". An oracle named Hierocles drops by uninvited and wishes to help himself to the meat. However, after he begins to tell prophesies against Peace, he is beaten and forcibly removed. Consulting the Oracle by John William Waterhouse An oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ...


Arms merchants then enter the town attempting to sell their wares for whatever small sum they can get; since the war is over their wares are no longer needed. Trygaeus adds insult to injury, saying such things as he'll buy a breast plate and use it as a stool, or buy spears to use as vine props. Insulted, they leave Athens in time for the wedding of Trygaeus and


Translations

  • Benjamin B. Rogers, 1924 - verse
  • Arthur S. Way, 1934 - verse
  • Alan Sommerstein, 1978 - prose
  • George Theodoridis, 2002 - prose: full text
  • unknown translator - prose: full text
Surviving plays by Aristophanes

  Results from FactBites:
 
Peace (play) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (554 words)
Peace is a comedy written and produced by the ancient Greek playwright Aristophanes.
The elderly farmer Trygaeus is the central figure of the play.
Peace is still upset over how the Greeks have treated her (such as the many denials of treaties during the Peloponnesian War), and will only talk to Trygaeus and the other Greeks through Hermes.
Peace (2052 words)
At a time when adults seem unable and unwilling to live in peace, it is imperative that we explore all of the resources we have at our disposal to bring about peace on earth.
Play's love has everything to do with a willingness to be vulnerable in an unconditional and fierce commitment to another's thriving.
Play is done by heart and combat is "played for keeps." In moments of play the boundaries of the self expand outward allowing a kinship in which I feel a "belonging to all life." In this play the "I" passes insensibly into a "we" and our sense of self disappears.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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